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Full text of "Bowdoin Orient"

VOLUME III. 



EDITORS : 

S. V. Coi.E, W. T. GooDAi.E, F. W. Hawthorne, L. H. Kimball, 

D. O. S. Lowell, F. K. Wheeler, H. K. White. 




BOWDOIN COLLEGE, 

BRUNSWICK, MAINE. 



1873-74- 



f--^^ 



I^UM/^ yiifZfCM 



PRINTED AT THE .TOURN'AL OFFICE, LETflSTON, MAINE. 



INDEX TO VOL. III. 



PAGE 

A. A. A. S 82 

Acquaiutances 51 

Affairs of the Day 125, 136 

Aluaini Association of Bo.ston 178 

" " " New Yorli 165 

Alumni Eecord. 

9,22, 94, 119, 130, 142, 155, 177, 191, 202 

Alumni Record of '70 165 

" " " '72 130 

" " " '73 94 

Amorum Amor (poem) 67 

Aualytics, Burial of 69 

Base Ball, Bowdoins vs. Bates 117 

Base Ball CouventioQ 10 

Blouses 91 

Blunders 67 

Boating 75 

Boating Convention 9 

Boating Meeting 93 

Bolting, Right of 112 

Book Table 11, 1 05 

Bourne, Hon. Edward Emerson 97 

Bowdoin in the East 157 

Bowdoin in the Past 172 

Bowdoin in 1852 187 

Brook, The [poem) 110 

Brown Prizes 52 

Bugle 140 

Burial of Analytics 69 

Carcassonne [poem) 70 

Changes in England 58 

Changes in Faculty 78 

Claribel [poem) 73 

Class Elections 89 

Class Excursion 39 

Class OfiBcers of '74 175 

Class Ode of '73 68 

College News 11, 23, 46, 59, 70 

College Regatta 173 



Colleges, Early American . . - .' 194 

Commencement 66 

Commencement Week, Programme of 55, 69 

" " Review of 78 

Communication 29, 44, 63, 79, 100, 122 

Cornell Tragedy 115, 137 

Crosby, Professor Dixi 113 

Day Dreams (poem) 109 

Degrees 195 

Dryad (poem) 85 

Editorial. -.6, 18, 30, 42, 54, 66, 78, 90, 102, 114, 

126, 138, 150, 162, 174, 186, 198 

Editors' Table. ..129, 141, 153, 167, 176, 190, 201 

Education at Bowdoin 30 

England, Changes in 58 

English Branches 54 

Ennui (poem) 157 

Ei)itaphs 85 

Epitaph on a Goody 17 

Exclianges 33, 142 

Female Education 37 

Fisher's Wife (poem) 133 

Foot Ball 128 

Four Years' Fight on our Campus Martius . . 183 

Freshman Base Ball Convention 10 

Freshman Class Officers 93 

General Societies 16, 29, 95 

German University Life, Incidents from. I. . . 98 
" " " " " II... 110 

" " " " " III... 121 

Gleanings 131, 143, 156, 166, 179, 191, 203 

Gower, Godfrey Noel 179 

Gutenberg, John 87 

Hale, John P 139 

Helicon College, Story of 61 

Heroes, Our (poem) 193 



INDEX. 



Hope, Noel 179 

Hyena 19 

Imitation in Literature 184 

Influence of Bowdoin iu the West 38 

Inter -Collegiate Literary Convention. 

161, 163, 169 

Inter -Collegiate Literary Contests 181 

Invalid Corps 43 

Johnson's Dictionary 5 

Lectures, the Bowdoin 114, 138 

Let us Have our Work Better Done 1 

Letter 74 

Library of Dr. Woods 107 

Life Song, The {poem) '. 135 

Local 7, 19, 31, 45, 56, 68, 80, 91, 104, 118, 

127, 141, 152, 164, 175, 189, 199 
Lost [poem) 1 

May {poem) 17 

May-Day 15 

Memoria {poem) 197 

Memory 29 

Mezzofauti, Cardinal - 40 

Military Department 63, 145 

Mistaken {poem) 145 

Mohammed 4 

Morning Star 151 

My Friend Sykes 76 

Necrology of Bowdoiu College for 1873 .... 67 

New, The {poem) 145 

Noel - Hope 179 

Origin of " Old Crimes " 124 

Origin of Things 53 

Original Thinking 185 

Pain and Pleasure 176 

Petition before the Boards 159 

Peucinian and Atheuean 54, 55 

Pledging Freshmen 79 

Post-Graduate Course . 64 

Price, George, Presentation to 113 



PAGE 

Principle, A Wrong 193 

Proverbs. 1 2 

II 52 

Psi Upsilou Convention 70 

Eeading Eoom 102, 123 

Eed Cotton Night Cap Country 17 

Eegatta 34 

Eeligious Intolerance 5 

Eeminiscences. 1 13 

II 26 

III 49 

Eeview of Commencement Week 78 

Eichest Prince {pioem) 169 

Eight of Bolting 112 

Eockwood, Professor 162 

Sackcloth and Ashes {poem) 25 

Scientific Observations 86 

Senior Class Election 171 

Smith, George E 77 

Social Science, Society of 58 

Society Campaign 93 

Sonnet 185 

Spring {poem) 195 

Teachers 100 

Telegraph 44, 150 

" TelegTa[)h " and the Drill 135 

Telegraph Company 175 

Theories 160 

To a Blauk Leaf {imem) 73 

To-morrow {ijoem) 133 

True Story of Helicon College 61 

Trustees and Overseers' Meeting 140 

Tweed and Stokes 136 

Valedictory 196 

Vassar College 139 

Virginius, The 137 

Volaute 82 

Walker, CM 68 

Warner, CD 65 

What Was It? 132 

Woods', Dr., Library 107 



Vol. III. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, APEIL 30, 1873. 



No. 1. 



LOST. 

" Dearer than gold or pearl to me," — 
T]ie u-ind slipped down to the sea so cold,- 

" The Past that is uever more to be," — 
Clouds orcr the mountain rolled. 

The heart sat lone at fall of day, — 

The wind slipped down to the sea so cold,- 

A thought shone in from the far away, — 
Clouds over the mountain rolled. 



"He is gone: I never shall see him again," — 
The wind slipped down to the sea so cold, — 

" I have sought from mountain to sea iu vaiu,"- 
Clonds over the mountain rolled. 

" In through the gold doors of the sun 
Flmig open for his coming wide. 
Bearing my work in his arms undone 
He entered at the eventide. 

" To whom will ho show my work undone 1 
No eye could follow whither he went; 
Of all the birds that fly, not <me 
Hath brought a message backward sent. 

" Love only may pierce, for no sound hath 
The curtain of silence across his path; 
But 'love is blind' aud hath no sense 
To tell tlie whither, when and whence. 

" We have, yet sock, aud not till lost 
Does that we have display its worth ; 
Is it because what we love most 
'Was never meant to be of earth ? " 

The heart knocked long at the Future's gate, — 
The wind slipped down to the sea so cold, — 

No answer but to watch aud wait, — 
Clouds over the mountain rolled. 

To wait how long for the vanished host ? — 
The wind slipped down to the sea so cold, — 

Or is the lost forever lost? — 
Clouds over tlie mountain rolled. 



sy^'7 



^ 



LET US HAVE OUR WORK BETTER 
DONE. 

A house divided against itself cannot 
stand. But while the Orient is the same old 
house, a new family has moved in, the old one 
moved out. The former editors of the Orient 
will pardon us for the following criticism upon 
a leading article in one of last term's issues. 
" Let us have more work " is the stirring 
motto of the writer. Whether it be laziness 
or sober sense after all, we earnestly plead 
that the threatened reform (if reform it be) 
may be delayed at least one year longer. The 
great need of oiu- College curriculum is not 
" more work," but the same work better done. 
The course, as laid down in the catalogue, 
already inspires enough dread in the timid 
hearts of coming Freshmen. Although hard- 
worked at the fitting school, we well remember 
how we wondered that so much work could 
be done iu a single term of the college year. 
Nor does the faithful, tliorough-going student 
after entering College find himself harassed 
by leisure hours and easy lessons. Oftener 
will he be obliged to leave one task half fin- 
ished to hasten to another. We appeal to the 
experience and good judgment of every stu- 
dent, Will not a thorough mastery of the pre- 
scribed branches of study consume every hour 
which should properly be devoted to them ? 
Do the Freshmen need a deeper draught of 
Latin and Greek or a stronger dose of Math- 
ematics ? Do the Sophomores grow luzy be- 
cause Analytics is not hard enough, or pine in 
idleness for more lines of Ajax ? Juniors, are 
3'ou ready to strike for more work ? Did your 
righteous indignation rise at the facility with 
which fifty pages of Physics were learned in 
a single day ? Seniors, you, we know, have 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



little to do. Worn and exhausted by the toils 
of three years, the Faculty dare tax you no 
further. But even in your case may it not 
be that a little less study in the past would 
have left more strength for future attaui- 
ments ? We do maintain that the men who 
resolve to fearlessly grasp and thoroughly 
master the difficulties of the College course 
need have no idle hours. 

And these are the men to whom the cur- 
riculum must be adapted. The question is not 
how many books or lectures can the most cas- 
ual student run over in the most casual way, 
but how much actual attainment can be made 
by those of patient application and thorough 
scholarship. The men of talent and industry 
must not be forced to neglect duties which 
would otherwise be performed, in order to fill 
for superficial scholars the leisure hours they 
already have no right to possess. No advan- 
tage would accrue to either class from such a 
course. 

And what is the aim of this demand for 
more work? That "lessons may be more 
thoroughly learned"! Is this logic? Is it 
justified by experience ? Do men labor more 
eiScieutl)' under heavier burdens ? Is thor- 
ouglmess the result of rapid progress ? Is it 
not the experience of every student that in- 
creased tasks inspire recklessness and indiffer- 
ence. No, no ; this is not the remedy for that 
spirit of carelessness, of indolence, which has 
come over college students. Under such a 
course " ponies " would be multiplied, cram- 
ming and cutting redoubled, and every abuse 
Avhich is desired to be corrected would be 
carried to still greater lengths. 

And what then is our remedy? Simply 
the work already nominally required must be 
more thoroughly done. The standard of schol- 
arship must be raised; conditions must be 
made more exacting ; sham examinations must 
be made real tests ; inefficient, indolent stu- 
dents must be dropped. There is at present 
no strong incentive to studiousness and activ- 



ity to those who desire mainly to pass the ex- 
aminations and graduate. Students Avill not 
be scholarly till scholarship is not only made 
an object of ambition but a necessity. If a 
college is too poor or unpopular for this stern 
course, it is its own misfortune. The only 
alternative is a few. good scholars or many 
poor ones. 



PROVERBS. 

The man who invented proverbs deserves 
to be classed among the greatest benefactors of 
the human race. As a substitute for thinking, 
they are ahead of everything, surpassing even 
the complete letter-writer. The3' have a way 
of making a point that is really refreshing, and 
are the most enjoyable sort of change to one 
trying to find bottom in metaphysics. Some 
of them express more practical truth in a 
single line than a moral philosopher in a dozen 
pages. The number of proverbs in all lan- 
guages is simply enormous, so that they offer 
an almost inexhaustible field to one who has 
a liking for good sharp common sense point- 
edly expressed. A large proportion of them 
show their meaning and their worth on their 
face, and are " plain enough to the blind," 
such as " They who live in glass houses should 
not throw stones," or " They who have straw 
wits should not play with fire." But we 
know that ,all are not equally quick of appre- 
hension, and that some proverbs seem to mean 
several things ; we have, therefore, uiidertaken 
to supply a desideratum in literature by 
throwing light on such as are likely to be mis- 
understood or misapplied, and by giving our 
estimate of the amount of credit due to each. 
Should this be received with favor the subject 
will be continued in another paper. 

" Forgive and Forget." Nothing can be 
of more practical value than the last half of 
this aphorism; it needs no better comment 
than the almost universal attention which is 



B WD OIN ORIENT. 



given to it. The first pai-t is so different that 
it is evidently by another author, and as it 
was not prefixed until people had got in the 
habit of practicing the last, it has never 
attracted much attention or been considered 
of much value. 

"Happy is he whose friends were born 
before him." The great fault of this proverb 
is its indefiniteness. If, as in our own case, 
the friends were born a couple of centuries 
before, it does not add materially to his 
•happiness. 

"Necessity is the mother of invention." 
We gave this a practical trial once when we 
were small, and the cook cauglit us in the 
pantry. That experience always gave us a 
prejudice in favor of tliat other proverb, "The 
least said the soonest mended." 

" Common fame is a common liar." Yes, 
Avorsc than that, she is often a most uncommon 
liar, still she has plenty of believers, and so 
goes on lying like the telegraph or the pro- 
spectus of a new magazine, and will, without 
doubt, continue her mendacity while curiosity 
and credulity are more plenty than judgment 
and discretion. 

" Little and often fills the purse." To be 
sure, but the same thing empties it, and at the 
bottom we find here as in other things, a sim- 
ple resolution of forces. 

" Business is the salt of life." This was 
written as an explanation of the fact that 
business men are so often in a pickle. 

" Lazy folks take the most pains." We 
learned the truth of this saying when we 
attended the district school. They called us 
the laziest boy in school and we certainly took 
the most pains. 

" Deliver your words not by number but 
by weight." Tliis aphorism, without doubt, 
means all right, but we would advise most of 
our writers and orators if they wish to make 
any show, to stick to the old plan of counting, 
at least until some more delicate balance is 
invented than is known at present. 



" Heaven helps those who help them- 
selves." This is not intended to include those 
who help themselves to their neighbor's wood 
pile or to another person's ideas. It is gen- 
erally thought that an entirely different 
locality helps in the latter sort of affairs. 

" Abundance, like want, has ruined raan}^." 
Not being of .the many who are in danger of 
being crushed b}^ their possessions, we feel no 
special interest in tliis most excellent aphor- 
ism, Init wanting every sort of abundance 
except an abundance of want, we leave this 
to those who know its application. 

" All are not thieves that dogs bark at." 
It is fortunate for the dogs that thej'- do bark 
at honest men sometimes. If they did regu- 
larly bark at all the thieves, of one grade and 
another, from tlie plagiarist down to the man 
who steals his newspaper, dogs wouldn't have 
as many friends, or dog laws of manj^ enemies, 
as at present. 

" The wise man despises flattery." About 
the only use of this proverb is to remind us 
of the extreme scarcity of wise people. 

" Ask thy purse what thou shouldst buy." 
We asked ours the other day but notwith- 
standing echo's habit of repeating the last 
word, it didn't say bui/, as we had fondly hoped. 

" It is never too late to mend." Our laun- 
dress says this isn't true of cotton stockings, 
pocket handkerchiefs, and some other articles. 

" Evil communications corrupt good man- 
ners." Punch says that this is the reason 
why editors are so apt to have their manners 
spoiled, they receive, from one correspondent 
and another, such a vast number of evil com- 
munications. 

" Misfortunes never come singly." We 
cannot refrain from closing our remarks by 
giving Longfellow's beautiful Aversion of this: 

" !N"eTer jumps a sheep that's frightened 

Over any fence ■(whatever, 

Over wall, or fence, or timber. 

But a second follows after; 

Aud a third upon the second, 

And a fourth, and fifth, and so on; 



BOWDOm ORIENT. 



First a sheep and then a dozen, 
Till they all, in quick succession. 
One by one have got clear over. 
So misfortunes almost always 
Follow after one another ; 
Seem to watch each other always ; 
When one sorrow leapeth over 
Then a crowd is sure to follow, 
Till the air of earth seems darkened." 

Solomon. 



MOHAMMED. 



Ill the foremost rank of those men whose 
lives have exerted a controlling power on the 
destinies of the human race, must be placed 
the Arabian Prophet. Probably no man has 
ever exerted so mighty an influence, either 
for good or for evil, upon his fellow men. 

Although more than twelve hundred years 
have passed since the scenes of that wonder- 
ful life were enacted, j^et nearly two hundred 
millions of people still hold him as the last 
and greatest of prophets, and ground their 
hopes of heaven on the doctrines which he 
taught. For many reasons it is not an easy 
task to form a just estimate of Mohammed or 
his system. For in the first place it is diffi- 
cult to turn the mind so entirely from the 
circumstances of the present as to judge im- 
partially of the character and conduct of one 
Avho lived in an age and condition which had 
almost nothing in common with our own. 
Besides, his system has ever been the most 
determined and bitter enemy of our religion 
and civilization. Mohammed should plainly 
be judged, not by the full light of our own 
civilization, but from the standpoint of his 
own age and circumstances. A brief consid- 
eration of a few of the leading facts in his 
life will show that he has been too severely 
judged when called a willful imposter. Mec- 
ca, the birthplace of the prophet, had been 
from remote antiquity the seat of idol wor- 
ship, and his own family had long held the 
dignity of the high-priesthood in that system 



of religion, and were custodians of the sacred 
temple. Thus from childhood he was not 
only trained in the rites and mysteries of that 
sj'stem, but was placed under the strongest 
motives to desire its preservation. Add to 
this that he possessed abundant worldly means, 
and mere self ends would seem to be put out 
of the question. For while we would hardly 
give a man credit for siucerity who not only 
changes his opinions but betters his fortunes by 
the change, yet when we see a man dismiss his 
old opinions and embrace new ones at the ex- 
pense of worldly profit and advantage, though 
we may doubt his wisdom we cannot Avell im- 
peach his sincerity. 

Mohammed seems to have been formed for 
a religious visionary or enthusiast. His was a 
nature sensitive in the highest degree, and as 
he advanced in years he became fond of soli- 
tude and lonely musings, and it is hardly to be 
considered strange that in the visions and 
trances into which his over-excited mind was 
frequently thrown by his constant and ex- 
hausting meditations upon the great subject 
to which he gave himself, he received what 
he honestly believed to be a call to his great 
work. He seems at first to have had no an- 
ticipation of the great results which circum- 
stances, far more than his ,own policy or de- 
signs, were to bring about from his teaching. 

In regard to his system of religion he seems 
at an early age to have become dissatisfied 
with idolatry, and through his contact both at 
home and abroad, with Christians and Jews, 
to have imbibed the great idea of the one liv- 
ing and true God. But when he sought for 
the religion of this true God he seemed to 
seek in vain. Judaism, leaving out its cor- 
ruptions, was a narrow, illiberal family relig- 
ion, little fitted for the wants of the world. 
And with Christianity, as he knew it, the case 
was still worse. It is evident that his theolo- 
gy and ethics were mainly borrowed from the 
Bible, and that the Koran is largely a rehash 
of Jewish and Christian doctrines and tradi- 



BOWDOIN OB IE NT. 



tions in the loose and inaccurate form in which 
its author had learned tliem by oral communi- 
cation. As a man we must concede to Mo- 
hammed a high rank. The great offence laid 
to his charge is that as his power increased lie 
forsook the gentler doctrines of his early 
teaching and propagated his religion by the 
sword. Upon this point the Christian world 
at least should have very little to say. Such 
practices were the natural result of the dark- 
ness and barbarism of the age, and for them 
no church and no faith is to be held respon- 
sible. 



RELIGIOUS INTOLERANCE. 

It has required ages for men to learn the 
plainest lessons of civil government. The 
shrewdness and good sense they used in most 
trivial matters of business they never thought 
to apply to the affairs of state. New rules of 
logic, new metliods of reasoning, they thought, 
were necessary for the discussion of practical 
questions. Painfully has this been true in the 
vexed question of Church and State. Deaf 
alike to the suggestions of good judgment, 
the voice of experience, the promptings of 
humanity, they have clung persistently to the 
system of religious intolerance. This bigotry 
has not been confined to particular sects and 
creeds. All have shared it. The Calvinists 
and Lutherans of the sixteenth century were 
as bitter and vindictive towards eacli other as 
either towards the Catholics or the Catholics 
towards them. 

Men have read the truths of religious 
freedom from letters of blood. Its stern les- 
sons have been rung in their ears by tlie bugle's 
blast and the battle's roar. Death and desola- 
tion, misery and want have been the terrible 
text books of History's school-room. But 
they liave been thoroughly learned. Dull and 
stubborn as is the heart of man, he has found 
that Nature is still more changeless and un- 
wavering. Slowly and surely Religious Lib- 



erty has cut its way into the laws of nations. 
England has learned it first of all, j'et through 
years of revolution. France has recognized 
it after centuries of civil war. It has been 
scourged into Germany by thirty 3'ears of des- 
olating strife. But the lesson once learned 
will not be forgotten. The terrible discipline 
will not need to be repeated. In civilized 
nations religious liberty is a fixed and perma- 
nent fact, and thought and opinion as free as 
air. 



Credulous reader, if your faith in human 
veracity has never yet been shaken, we ask 
you to read the following story, which is sub- 
stantiated by good authority. Sir Everard 
Digby, a prominent conspirator in the famous 
Gunpowder Plot, expiated his crime on the 
scaffold in 1606. After the head was struck 
off the executioner proceeded, according to 
the barbarous usages of the/laj-, to pluck the 
heart from his bod}"- ; and Wlien he had done 
so he held it up in full viVw of the numerous 
assemljlage, and shouted with a loud voice, 
"This is the heart oFa traitor." Upon this 
the head which was quietly resting on the 
scaffold, at the distance of a few feet, showed 
sundry signs of indignation, and opening its 
mouth, audibly exclaimed, " That is a lie." 



Out of 15,784 words in the folio edition of 
Johnson's dictionary, a critical examination 
has assigned to Latin origin 6,732, to French 
4,812, to Saxon 1,665, to Greek 1,148, to 
Dutch 691, to Italian 211, to German (not 
Saxon) 116, to Welsh 95, to Danish 75, to 
Spanish 56, to Icelandic 50. The remainder, 
143 in nimiber, are derived variouslj'' from 
Swedish, Hebrew, Gothic, Arabic, etc. To 
show how completely the language of the 
ancient Celts has been superseded by that of 
their conquerors, barely one liundred of these 
words have been derived from that source. 



BOWDOIN OBIENT. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERT ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DUR- 
ING THE COLLEGIATE TEAR AT 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE, 
Bt the Class of 1874. 

EDITORS. 

S. V. Cole, L. H. Kimball, 

W. T. Goodale, D. 0. S. Lowell, 

F. W. Hawthorne, F. K. Wheeler, 

H. K. White. 

Terms — $2 00 a year in advance; siuglc copies, 
15 cents. 

Address communications to Bowdoin Orient, 
Brunswick, Maine. 

For sale at 7 Appleton Hall, Bowdoin College. 
Also by J. Griffin and B. G. Denuison, Brunswick; 
and A. Williams & Co., 135 Washington St., Boston. 



CONTENTS. 
Vol. III., No. I.— April 30, 1873. 

Lost 1 

Let us Have our Work Better Done 1 

Proverbs 2 

Mohammed 4 

Religious Intolerance 5 

Editorial 6 

Local 7 

Alumni Record 9 

Boating Convention 9 

Base-Ball Convention 10 

College News 11 

Editors' Book-Table 11 



" How many things by season seasoned are." 

We ! How vividly that word brings up 
our early recollections when we were readers 
instead of writers, and wondered why every 
paper had two editors who always traveled 
together, as inseparable as Chang and Eng. 
But one day while exploring the mysteries of 
an English Grammar, we unexpectedly found 



our enigma solved, and learned that " we " 
was only the trade mark of editors and mon- 
archs. But the reader is wondering, by this 
time, if digressions are ever " seasoned by 
season," so let us return. 

We thinlv it seasonable, at the beginning 
of our editorial labors, to take a retrospective, 
inspective and prospective view of our publi- 
cation. 

Two years since, the class of '72, moved - 
by a j^atriotic impulse, resolved to immolate a 
few unfortunates upon the altar of journalism. 
This propitiatory offering to Lueina was 
favorably received and a literary child was 
born and called The Orient. 

Under the management of an able corps 
of editors this publication became so popular 
among the collegians and their friends that it 
was considered indispensable, and '73 assumed 
the responsibility for the succeeding year. 
Profiting by the example and experience of 
their predecessors, they soon gained a general 
popularity throughout college. We say " gen- 
eral," for there are always some uncharitable 
souls who, instead of giving honor to whom 
it is due, prefer a prophet from another country 
than their own. We all know such persons 
and the value of their opinions, and so let 
them pass. Let the fact that The Orient 
retained its original spiciness throughout the 
year, and that nearly every old subscriber has 
renewed his subscription and many new ones 
have been obtained, testify to the success of '73. 

Thus briefly have we played the historian 
— now for a little autobiography. Our edi- 
torial life has not been of long duration, and 
our inspection will be but momentary. We 
have had the temerity to make some changes 
in The Orient. First a word in regard to 
the change of name. Objections have often 
been raised against the name Orient, sup- 
posing it was first chosen because we were an 
Eastern College, regardless of the longitude 
of Waterville and Orono. But this is a false 
idea. The Orient is the seal of Bowdoin, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



and was, therefore, considered a fit name for 
the college publication. But since many out- 
side the college are ignorant of this fact, we 
have coupled the Orient with another ternl 
indicative of its origin, and present our jour- 
nal to the criticising world with the cognomen 
of the BowDOix Oriext. 

We trust too that the use of tinted paper 
and the change of size will commend them- 
selves to the reader as improvements. 
Now the prophecj', alias prospectus. 
The Orient will still strive to be the ex- 
ponent of the college, and will be open, as 
heretofore, to communications from the fac- 
ulty, ahnnni, undergraduates and friends of 
the college ; and an invitation is cordially ex- 
tended to all wlio will, to favor us with con- 
tributions. 

Local affairs will receive a large share of 
our attention, which is an especial reason why 
all who have ever been members of the college 
should subscribe, for they cannot be indifferent 
to what transpires on the campus — which is 
inartius now — and among the PinosLoquenie?. 
For the same reason college students 
should take and carefully preserve the Orient. 
Everybody has tried to beep a diary, and 
everybody agrees with ]\Iark Twain, that it is 
impossible. We begin and write two or three 
pages a day for a week, while we are doing 
nothing and nothing happens. Then comes a 
press of business, and just at the time our life's 
history begins our autobiography ends. A 
distinguished writer, and a son of Bowdoin, 
has said " we often enjoy more in anticipation 
than in realization." We are inclined to think 
so, but we think reflection is productive of 
more pleasure than anticipation. To look 
over the real past and see what times we have 
had, or " might have had," thrills us far more 
than all speculations upon an imaginary future. 
But memory is often at fault as well as diaries, 
and fails to recall many an episode of college 
life, the mere mention of whicli would bring 
vividly to mind a living picture. 



Therefore, to all those who anticipate great 
joy as husbands and fathers, we warn them to 
provide against disappointment in the realiza- 
tion, by laying up material for reflection, in 
the shape of an unbroken file of the Orient 
during their collegiate years. Then, when 
infantile lips beg for a story, a glance at the 
locals of " auld lang syne " will furnish the 
material for many a marvelous tale. 

Especial attention will be given to the 
Alumni Record, that our subscribers may be 
informed as nearl}^ as possible of the where- 
abouts of their friends and classmates. 

And now our prologue is finished. Has 
it been fragmentary ? Has the plural of 
Holmes's " third vowel " figured too conspic- 
uousW ? Quite possibly. But we are tyros 
in the art, and onh^ ask for youv faith and 
patronage, and will do our best to render an 
equivalent. 



LOCAL. 

The Peucinian Libi'ary is to be re-arranged 
sometime during the present term. 

A Senior, observing the graceful sweep of 
the Topsham falls, sagely remarks, " Water 
never acts on the square." 

A practical Junior, boarding at the hotel, 
remarks that he finds a fine field for studying 
Natural History in " Tontine " mince pies. 
What does he mean ? 

The Junior class proposes to plant an ivy 
some time during the coming month, with 
appropriate exercises, and to invite their friends 
to " tread the mazy'" with them in the even- 
ing at an " Ivy Hop." 

A match game of chess between three 
Juniors and three Sophomores, last Friday 
evening, resulted in a victory for the latter. 
Time of game, six hours and seven minutes ; 
number of moves each, thirty-seven. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



We notice nianj^ students strolling along 
towards Topsham bridge these beautiful even- 
ings. One is amply repaid for the walk. The 
river is very high, and the falls are grand. 

" Animal life " is on the increase at Bow- 
doin. " Horses " have long been the favorites, 
and a few (?) are still among us. Now our 
sporting men are fast possessing themselves of 
dogs. Newfoundlands and bull terriers are 
the choice. The south end of Appleton al- 
ready boasts of three, with two more " on 
deck." 

We notice in the last issue of the Bart- 
mouth some resolutions passed by the Senior 
class there, on the death of B. F. Clarke. 
Mr. Clark will be remembered as a member 
of '73, here at Bowdoin, during his Freshman 
vear. His is the first death which has occurred 
among the number which entered with this 
class. 

Scene, Tutor's door. Freshman gives three 
ominous raps as if he " meant business." Door 
opens. Freshman presents a sheet of foolscap 
covered with figures, accuses his instructors 
of unfairness in ranking him, and avers that 
there will be trouble unless they make it con- 
form with his accounts. When last seen he 
was astride of a red chest, studying a cata- 
logue of Bates. 

A few small but intensified Freshmen 
attempted recently to revive a custom of for- 
mer years, called a " Peanut Drunk." The 
Sophomores suspecting their intentions, dis- 
cended upon them. Judging from the pile of 
slate pencils, rubber balls and copper-toed 
boots which the " end-woman " swept out in 
the morning, we should prophesy that peanuts 
will have no charms for Freshmen in the 
future. 

The steward of the club was sitting 

at his table late the other evening, pondering 
on the sudden rise in beans, when two Sopho- 
mores entered and threw a long plank upon 



the floor; they then commenced jumping upon 
it in a manner at once lively and verj'- sug- 
gestive of recent exhibitions of " stone fence." 
They explained their strange conduct by a 
desire -on their part to "settle their board." 
Their parents have been informed. 

The Senior and Junior Exhibition, the 
programme of which appeared in a preceding 
number of the Orient, took place in the 
Baptist church on the last Monday evening of 
last term. The house was well filled. The 
exercises were interesting, and were listened 
to with great pleasure. The parts were varied 
and, as a general thing, well written and well 
delivered. The music was furnished by the 
Bowdoin Orchestra, and was quite an improve- 
ment on that given at the last exhibition. 
Though there is still a chance for improve- 
ment, they evince by their practice a determ- 
ination to excel, and should meet with encour- 
agement and approbation. 

Cadet Hop. — The " Hop " at the close of 
last term was in every way a success. Le- 
mont Hall was very tastefully decorated with 
American flags, and, with bayonets and swords, 
presented quite a martial appearance. The 
company was somewhat larger than is usual 
at the ordinary hops (this was no common 
hop), aud, among the ladies, many tasty and 
elegant toilettes were noticeable. After the 
first waltz, no gentleman allowed the fit of his 
uniform to influence the enjoyment of the 
occasion, and consequently everything passed 
off pleasantly. A Senior, whose college course 
has been marked by a greater devotion to 
quadrilles and Terpsichore than to quad- 
rangles and moral law, avers that no event in 
society has equalled this hop since that " me- 
morable ball given by '66 in Sodom's Hall." 



A Senior in the astronomy class wishes to 
know how an eclipse of the sun would appear 
if it should happen when the moon was only 
half full. — Volante. 



BO WD OIN ORIENT. 



ALUMNI RECORD. 



[We earnestly request contributions for this 
department from the Alumni and friends of the 
College.] 

'37. — George F. Talbot is in the practice 
of law in Portland. He has recently returned 
from a European tour. 

'44. — The class of 1844 will have a re- 
union and class dinner at the Falmouth Hotel, 
in Portland, in July. This class numbers 
among its members an unusually large number 
of prominent and well-known gentlemen. 

'45. — Rev. John P. Skeele, formerly of 
Alfred, has dissolved his connection with the 
Congregational Church at Harwich, Mass. 

'47. — Rev. Dr. John Cotton Smith of New 
York, is editor-in-chief of the Church and 
State. 

'50. — Rev. Henry F. Harding is complet- 
ing the arrangements for erecting the build- 
ings of the Classical School at Hallowell, this 
season. 

'53. — Henry C. Goodenow was recently 
appointed Judge of the Police Court in 
Bangor. 

'56. — Edwin B. Smith of Saco, has been 
appointed, by the Governor, Recorder of 
Decisions for the State. 

'57. — Hampden Fairfield was recentlj^ 
elected Supervisor of Schools, in Saco. 

'58. — Samuel F. Chase has resigned his 
position as Judge of the Municipal Court of 
Saco, having been appointed special agent of 
the Treasury Department. 

'60. — John Marshall Brown of Portland, 
is to deliver the address at Augusta on Memo- 
rial Day. 

'62.— Charles P. Mattocks of Portland, 
was recently elected Colonel of the regiment 
of militia of this State. 



'62. — Charles H. Pope is principal of the 
Young Ladies' Seminary at Benicia, Cal. 

'63. — George A. Haines is in business in 
Mobile. 

'65. — Charles Fish is principal of Hallo- 
well Classical and Scientific AcademJ^ 

'65. — Frank L. Hayes is practicing law in 
Boston. 

'67. — W. S. Hutchinson was in town 
recently. 

'69. — John C. Coombs is practicing law in 
Boston. 

'69.— Mr. William H. Woodwell of New- 
buryport, Jlass., a graduate of the last class 
of Andover Theological Seminarj^, is soon to 
be ordained over the Congregational Church 
in Wells. 

'70. — E. B. Weston has been appointed 
prosector in the Long Island College Hospital 
of Brooklyn, N. Y. 

'71. — Everett S. Stackpole is principal of 
the High School in Bloomfield, N. J. 

'72. — J. G. Abbott was recently admitted 
to the bar, and is now practicing in Augusta. 

'72. — Herbert M. Heath is preceptor of 
the Academy at East Machias. 



BOATING CONVENTION. 

The third annual convention of the Rowing 
Association of American Colleges was held at 
the Bay State House, Worcester, on Wednes- 
day, April 2d. Ten colleges were represented, 
viz.: Harvard, Yale, Brown, William, Am- 
herst, Amherst Agricultural, Wesleyan, Trin- 
ity, Cornell, and Bowdoin, the latter by Mr. 
A. J. Boardman of '73. 

Upon the application of Columbia and 
Dartmouth for representation, some discus- 
sion arose, owing; to a resolution that no col- 



10 



BOWBOIN ORIENT. 



lege should be admitted to the convention 
imless represented at the last Regatta. This 
resolution was finally voted null, and tlie del- 
egates were admitted. 

Messrs. Oakes (Yale), Coston (Wesleyan), 
and McLellan (Brown), Avere appointed by 
the chair a committee on nominations for of- 
ficers, and reported for President, R. J. Cook 
(Yale) ; Vice President, F. C. Eldred (Agri- 
cultural) ; Secretary, A. J. Boardman (Bow- 
doin); Treasurer, E. M. Hart well (Am- 
herst). This ticket was elected unanimously. 

The day of the Regatta next came under 
discussion, and Thursday, July 17th, Avas 
finally decided upon. 

The question as to where the Regatta 
should be held, then arose. As the Springfield 
club had generously offered prizes, boat ac- 
commodations, etc., and as the Springfield 
course gave perfect satisfaction last year, this 
was decided upon without much opposition. 

The resolution which formed the chief 
business of the convention, and the one pro- 
vocative of the most spirited discussion, was 
the following : — 

Besolved, That au undergraduate connected with 
any institution be declared eligible for its represen- 
tatiTO or University crew, — meaning by "under- 
graduate " all candidates for the degree a.b., ph.b., 
or such other degree as represents a similar or par- 
allel course. But no person shall be allowed to row 
on the crew of one college who has graduated at 
another. 

This Avas followed by much confusion. A 
Avilderness of motions and amendments was 
offered, and it was extremely difficult to un- 
derstand what each delegate wished. The 
resolution Avas finally passed by a vote of eight 
to twelve. 

A committee was appointed to prcA'cnt 
pool selling at the Regatta. This cannot be 
entirely suppressed, but this action of the con- 
vention Avill have great weight. 

A resolution prohibiting the employment 
of professional "coachers" after this year, Avas 
carried. 



After appointing a Regatta Committee, of 
which Mr. F. S. Waterhouse of '73 is a mem- 
ber, the convention adjourned till the last 
Wednesday in March, 1874. 



FRESHMAN BASE-BALL CONVEN- 
TION. 

Delegates from the Freshman classes of 
Harvard, Yale, Amherst, Williams, Dartmouth 
and Bowdoin met at the Massasoit House in 
Springfield, on the evening of April 5th. 
Mr. Ferris of WilHams, was appointed chair- 
man, and Mr. Bridgham of Darraouth, secre- 
retary. 

Mr. Perry expressed a desire on the part 
of the Harvard Freshmen, to meet the Fresh- 
man Nines of all the Ncav England colleges, 
and suggested a tournament at Springfield on 
" Regatta Aveek," as the pleasantest Avay of 
all. Nearly all objected to this on the ground 
of expense, and Yale refused to enter. Mr. 
Perry then recommended private boarding, 
and mentioned the receipts as coming from 
gate money, inclining to the opinion that 
these would cover the whole expense. His 
motion that there be a tournament Avas 
seconded by Mr. Bridgham of Dartmouth, 
and carried. 

Some discussion then arose concerning the 
time for holding it, but Mondaj^, July 14th, 
Avas finally decided upon. Each Nine Avill 
play a game Avith CA^ery other Nine, and the 
championship Avill be given to that one Avin- 
ning the most games. 

The convention then adjourned to meet 
at the Massasoit House, Juljr 12th, at 3 p.m. 



Lafayette College has raised four dollars 
and sixty cents, but most of this will be put 
into a boat house. 

There are about fifteen young lady students 
in Cornell. 



BOWDOIN OBUENT. 



11 



COLLSaE NEWS. 



"Wesleyan Univei'sit}^ seems fully alive to 
boating and base-ball matters. 

Prof. j\'Ioses Coit Tyler, formerly of Mich- 
igan University, is now literary editor of tlie 
Christian Union. 

Profs. James Russell Lowell and Bayard 
Taylor are expected to deliver lectures at 
Cornell next year. 

The Rev. F. H. Newhall has consented to 
be a candidate for the Presidency of the Ohio 
Wesleyan Universit3^ 

The Madisonensis complains of the iinin- 
viting aspect of its reading room, and the 
paucity of papers and magazines. 

On the 29th iilt. Cambridge beat Oxford 
by over three boats' lengths. The score now 
stands : Oxford 16, Cambridge 14. 

The students of a German nniversity are 
about to publish a college paper, the only one 
in Europe corresponding to the American 

type— -AV- 

Difference between a Regatta prize and a 
smarter dog : One is a pewter cup, and the 
other a cuter pup. (The author's family are 
in mourning). — Advocate. 

" I am convinced, from personal observa- 
tion, that the best classical schools in Great 
Britain to-day stand below the best in the 
United States." — Professor Boise. 

We liail with delight the appearance of 
the "Sophomore's Friend (half-calf!)" — a 
neat pocket dictionary, containing no words of 
less than five syllables. — Advocate. 

A retired or tired clergyman, fifty years 
old, has just entered the Freshman class at 
Dartmouth. His aspiration is " to finish up his 
mortal career with a college course." — Ex. 

Said a Prof, the other day to a Senior 
gnawing a chocolate drop during recitation, 
" Bring j^our candy to me." Meek-looking 
Senior advances, applauded by the whole 
class. — Dartmouth. 



EDITORS' BOOK TABLE. 

We desire to bring to the notice of the students 
a neat and tasty edition of the Constitution, issued 
by Messrs. Mason, Baker & Pratt, of Xew York. 
The Constitution is given in full, with all the amend- 
ments, a classified index and concordance. The 
compiler. Dr. Stearns, has rendered an invaluable 
service to all who need an accurate knowledge of 
this safeguard of our liberties. He deserves the es- 
pecial thanks of the student. The authority of the 
Constitution on any question of government in the 
United States can be obtained instantly, either by 
index or concordance. The book is equally fitted 
for reference or study, and is supplied with a hst of 
questions for the latter purpose. The study of the 
Constitution has been sadly neglected in our land, 
although considerable attention is paid to it here in 
the Senior year. We recommend this edition of the 
Constitution to the present Seniors for reference and 
to the other classes for study. 

LippincotVs Magazine for May is at hand. The 
contents are as follows : The Roumi in Kabylia, 
third paper ; Our Home in the Tyrol, by Margaret 
Howitt ; Wilmington and its Industries ; Marie Fa- 
raette and her Lovers: Salmon Fishing in Canada; 
A Princess of Thulc, liy William Black ; At Odds ; 
The Philadelphia Zoological Gardens; Berrytown, 
by Rebecca Harding Davis ; Overdue ; Queen Vic- 
toria as a Millionaire; Cricket in America; Our 
Monthly Gossip ; Literature of the Day. 



The Yale Glee Club has recently given 
concerts in Norwalk, Hartford, Brooklyn, 
Orange, Elizabeth and New York. They met 
Avith flattering success on all sides. As now 
composed, the club consists of iive Seniors, 
four Juniors, two Sophomores, and four 
Freshmen. 

BUSINESS CARDS. 

S TROUT & nOLJffiS, 
Counselors at Law, 

81 Canal Bank Euildinj, PORTLAND. 

A. A. STBOHT. GEO. F. HOLMES ('66). 

JOSEPH A. LOCKE (Bowdoin, 66), Attorney and Counsellor at Law, 
74 Middle Street, cor. Exchange Street, POKILAND. 

JOSIAH H. DKUiMMOND (Colby, 'i6) CounseUor at Law, 100 Exchange 
street, PORTLAND. 



12 



BOWBOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Classical Department. 

TERMS OF ADMISSION. 

Candidates for admission into the Freshman Class are examined as fol- 
lows : — 

Harkness's Latin Grammar, including Prosody; Parts I. and II. Hark- 
ness's Introduction to Latin Prose Composition; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the iEneid; Cicero's Select Orations; Sallust. 

Hadley's or Goodwin's Greek Grammar; Goodwin's Greek Reader; or 
Xenophon's Anabasis, 4 books, and Homer's Iliad, 2 books. 

Arithmetic; Algebra, to equations of the second degree; Davies's 
Legendre's Geometry, first and third books. 

English Grammar; Ancient and Slodern Geography. 

Scientific Department, 

TERMS OF ADMISSION. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the following subjects :— 
Mathematics — Arithmetic, including Common and Decimal Frac- 
tious, Interest, and Square Root; Algebra, to Equations of the 
Second Degree; Geometry, Books I. and m. of Davies's Le- 
gendre. 
Geography — Political Geography, and simple elements of Astrono- 
mical and Physical Geography. 
History — Leading facts in general History, and especially in Ameri- 
can History. 
Latin — Allen's Latin Grammar, or the equivalent. 
English — The examination will consist in 1st, Reading aloud a pas- 
sage from some standard author, with explanations of gram- 
matical construction, and definition and derivation of words; 2d, 
Writing a few sentences in English, on some familiar subject, 
reference being had to spelling and punctuation as well as to 
composition; 3d Correction^ of ungrammatical sentences com- 
posed for the purpose. 
AH candidates for admission must produce certificates of their good 
moral character. 

The time for admission is the Friday after Commencement, and the 
first Thursday of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants may be 
examined at other times. 

Courses of Study. 

The regular course of Instruction is that commended by the leading 
colleges of the country as eminently adapted^to secure liberal culture. 

THE SCIENTIFIC COURSE 

has been recently organized. Thirty-four students have already entered, — 
a fact which indicates that the College has been successful in its effort to 
meet the demand for a liberal course of study which shall at the same 
time look towards the actual uses and applications of knowledge. 
The studies pursued in this course are comprised in the following: — 
Languages — English one year, and optional two ; Latin one year, 
optional three ; French one year, optional three ; German one 
year, optional two ; Spanish, Italian, Swedish, Anglo-Saxon, one 
year. 
Mathematics — Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, Mensuration, 
Spherical Trigonometry, Analytical Geometry ; Differential and 
Integral Calculus, with the application of these to Surveying, 
Navigation, Projections, DialUng, Levelling, Astronomy, Mechan- 
ics, Topographical and Hydrographical Engineering. 
Natural History — Geology, Mineralogy, Botany, Zoology, with their 
relations to the Industrial Arts. 



Natural Philosophy — Mechanics, Hydrodynamics, Pneumatics, 
Optics, Astronomy, Light, Heat, Electricity, &c. 

Chemistry — In all its branches and applications. 

History and Po/iVzca^ Science— General, Medieval and Modern His- 
tory, Political Economy, General Principles of Law, Interna- 
tional Liw, Law of Evidence, Constitution of United States, 
Theory of Government, American Law. 

Philosophy — Rhetoric, Logic, Psychology, Metaphysics, Evidences 
of Natural and Revealed Rehgion, Ethics, Esthetics. 

The studies of the first two years are common throughout the Depart- 
ment and are intended to lay a broad and substantial foundation for all 
branches of subsequent study. In the last two years the studies are 
arranged in distinct com-ses, in accordance with certain leading objects : a 
general scientific culture, or special technical skill. Attention is particu- 
larly invited to the facilities offered for the thorough study of Civil Engi- 
neering. 



A POST-GRADUATE COURSE 



which Instruction wiU be given in 



of two years is also commenced, i 
the following schools : — 

I. Letters — Comprising Languages, Ancient and Modern (includ- 
ing the Oriental) with theu- literatures; Philology; Rhetoric; 
Logic ; History ; Elocution ; the Fine Arts. This leads to the 
degree of Master of Arts. 

n. Science — Advanced Mathematics, Physics, Natural History and 
Chemistry, in their uses and apphcations. This leads to the 
degree of Doctor of Science. 

m. Philosophy — Comprising the above, considered in their reasons 
and relations ; Psychology, Metaphysics, Ethics, Esthetics ; Poli- 
tics ; Theory of Government, Constitutional History, Principles 
of Law, International Law. Leading to the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy. 

IV. iWedzcine— The Medical School of Maine. Degree, — M. D. 

Students who are not graduates will be received on satisfactory evi- 
dence of proficiency in study which will enable them* to profit by this 
Course. 

Much and careful attention is given to Physical Culture under the train- 
ing of accomplished Instructors. The Gymnasium is well provided with 
approved apparatus, and the opportunities for Military drill and discipUne 
are of the very best. 

It is but just to say that good morals and manliness are distinguishing 
features of college life at Bowdoin. 

The Library of Bowdoin is one of rare value, and the choicest works 
are constantly added. The Gallery of Paintings is well known to be one of 
the most remarkable in the country. The Cabinet and apparatus are 
ample for their purjiosc. 

The annual expenses are, for tuition, &c., $90. Board $2.50 and S4.00 
a week. Pecuniary assistance, from the income of thirty scholarships and 
various other benefactions, is rendered to those who are unable fully to 
meet their expenses otherwise. 

Commencement July 10th. Examination for admission July 12th and 
Aug. 28th, at 9 a.m. 

First term begins Aug. 28th, at evening. 

Every encouragement will be given to pei-sons who desire to pursue 
any study taught in the College. 

The town of Brunswick, situated on tide water — the Androscoggin River 
on one side and the Ocean on the other ; already a seat of various manu- 
factures and destined to become one of the principal railroad centres of the 
State, easy also of access from all quarters, — ^presents an excellent locahty 
for scientific as well as literary pursuits, while the facilities afforded by 
Bowdoin College, its Libraries, Galleries of Art, Cabinets, Scientific Col- 
lections, Laboratories, and Apparatus, offer great inducements to the ear- 
nest student of the Useful and Liberal Art3. 



Vol. III. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MAY 14, 1873. 



No. 



Written for the Orient. 

REMINISCENCES. 

I. 

[The following was addressed to a friend who 
had requested the writer (of the class of 1817) to 
furnish some reminiscences of the earlier life of the 
college.] 

I have very many of the early recollec- 
tions of College, but to a Bowdoin antiqua- 
rian they are so mixed up with other mundane 
matters as to be of little interest to him 
unless he can find some Jonathan Oldbuck or 
Old Mortalit}' who may be ready and willing 
to chisel out all such lichens and foreign 
elements. 

Pour or five days ago my friend, Professor 
J. S. S., called upon me, and among other 
pleasant incidents told me that Professor 
Rockwood had been engaged lately in repair- 
ing and fixing up the big reflecting telescope. 
This gratified me exceeding!}'. Deep and 
penetrating wounds of our flesh, you know, 
may heal well and kindlj', but a scar always 
remains and even a century of subsequent 
life will fail to obliterate this souvenir of the 
misfortune. So has it been with the history 
of our telescope to my memory — it made a 
deep dent there and will never be forgotten. 

In the early educational life of Bowdoin 
there were only two instructors — my father 
and Professor Abbot. The latter had charge 
of the recitations in Latin and Greek, the 
former in Natural Philosophy, with Jones for 
a text book, in Mathematics, Astronomy (1 be- 
lieve with Enfield), John Locke, Paley and Ber- 
lamaque on Natural Law — possibly, Dugald 
Stuart and Bishop Butler — I am not sure 
about them all. All the apparatus belonging 
to the college was a surveyor's compass and 
chain. About 1804 some one down east gave 



my father an old orrerj' for the college ; it 
had a thin sky-blue bombazette cap-case. I 
don't know but it is in college now — to my 
knowledge it was for many years. My father 
for 3'ears before he came to Brunswick, had a 
Gregorian telescope, the same which now is 
in my study and which you have seen many 
times. Also he had a beautiful sextant, a 
present from an old retired ship master, six 
or eight j'ears before coming to Brunswick. 
With this scanty apparatus, father used to 
give out-door instruction. If a farmer was 
wishing to know how much land he had, the 
whole class, he leading the way, Avould go oft' 
and measure it for him. The young gentle- 
men were taught to triangulate. The angles, 
two of them at least, were determined by the 
sextant, a short side for base measured by 
chain, and then the problem solved by loga- 
rithms. So with heights and distances. 

It was very natural my father should con- 
stantly feel a growing necessity for a still 
further supply of the means for a more ex- 
tended instruction, and that the college should 
possess all the facilities, and especiall}' the sci- 
entific appliances, which the funds might enable 
him to obtain. Dr. Benjamin Vaughn of 
Hallowell, was a steadfast and early friend of 
the college ; he was, too, a very learned man. 
He was English by birth, had been educated 
by the famous Joseph Priestly, a member 
also of the house of Commons, and in the 
earlier years of his Pai'liamentary life, I 
believe, was a member of the Whig party and 
the friend of Charles James Fox. What the 
precise reasons were for his emigration to this 
country I never knew. I have some reason, 
however, to believe that he made his history 
previously to removing- to this country, known 



14 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



to my father. Between this gentleman and 
my father there was a strong friendship and 
cordial intimacy for many years. Upon pre- 
senting a view of the case to Dr. Vaughn, the 
latter seemed to feel its importance, and with 
a strong sympathy for the college, suggested 
that his brother William, who spent a con- 
siderable portion of every year in London, 
would be ready and willing to assist in nego- 
tiating for the purchase of a telescope of 
such power and perfection as would be 
creditable to the college and the country. 
Besides this general endowment to obtain the 
large telescope there was a subordinate 
motive, just at this time, which seemed to 
stimulate, in the minds of all interested, a 
greater activity for its procurement. In a 
little more than a year there was to be a total 
eclipse of the moon, and it was thought to be 
very desirable to have all the needful appa- 
ratus at hand to determine the longitude of 
Brunswick. At this time the area of the 
college yard was simply a clearing among the 
pine trees. There were but four or five 
houses on the hill. The whole of the mall 
was then forest, up to within two rods space 
of Mr. Robert Bowker's and Mr. C. J. Noyes's 
houses. Of the latitude and longitude of 
Bowdoin College but little more was known 
than of that of the Modoc Indian country or 
Capt. Jack's lava beds, or of Timbuctoo. 
Some of the books and coast pilot charts gave 
what purported to be the latitude and longi- 
tude of Seguin, Cape Elizabeth and Portland 
harbor, but they could only be accepted as 
approximations. 

In 1849, I notice in my journal, we made 
up a party of ladies and gentlemen to call on 
Prof Bache and his family at Black Strap Hill, 
five or six miles west from Portland. This was 
just then his chief station. The whole of his 
force were comfortably living in their tents 
and hard at work, and at the same time inter- 
changing signals with detachments of the 
Coast Survey stations at other elevated points 



within an area of seventy-five miles. Miss 
Mitchell, the comet discoverer and mathema- 
tician, was here, and Prof Bache introduced 
us to her. She too was hard at work with 
her mathematical problems, and her conver- 
sation upon astronomical subjects which the 
occasion afforded me, impressed me strongly. 
She was quite tall and of a good figure. She 
would not be called handsome, but there was 
a presence about her which would inspire 
any one with respect of a higher order than 
simply a beautiful face could do. In fact her 
rich facial expression gives assurance of a 
capacity commensurate with the enthusiasm of 
her life and her success in mathematical 
science. It is well, perhaps, for the compla- 
cence' of some of our masculines that such 
examples as Miss Mitchell in general science 
are not more numerous. " One. swallow does 
not make a summer," so these exclusive 
gentlemen may continue to divide the honors 
with their scientific sisters, and enjoy the 
relief afl'orded them, that half a loaf of bread 
is better than nothing. Mrs. Prof. Bache did 
her part of the reception and entertained us 
with great urbanity of manner and with a 
refinement of culture which proved a long 
familiarity with good metropolitan society. 
It was no small part of the pleasure we en- 
joyed to look upon our host as the grandson 
of our great Benjamin Franklin. While show- 
ing us his apparatus and explaining the uses 
of some of the instruments I had never seen 
before, I enquired of the Professor if his 
survey had discovered important errors in 
the location upon our charts of the latitude 
and longitude of prominent headlands, and 
especially of lighthouses ? His answer was, 
" A great number of inaccuracies, and one 
lighthouse is eight miles out of its desig- 
nated location." In making this visit Presi- 
dent Woods was our cicerone. We spent 
one hour and forty minutes very pleasantly 
and returned to Yarmouth to dine, and 
reached home by rail about half past four p.m. 



ex. '.'ft. 



P^' \\ 



BOWJDOIN ORIENT. 



15 



MAY DAY. 

During the reign of Elizabeth the May- 
day festivities of our ancestors reached their 
height. Then Christmas alone was considered 
of more importance than the First of May, 
and coming at a time when Nature seemed to 
hold high jubilee, the latter festival was usu- 
ally the more hilarious. With us Spring is 
seldom far advanced on May day, but in " mer- 
rie England " it is then in its glory, and in the 
olden time 'twas gayly welcomed. On the 
preceding midnight the villagers were accus- 
tomed to assemble and rejjair to the woods in 
groups, where they passed the remainder of 
the night in games and amusements. At day- 
break they would proceed to the place of 
meeting, bearing branches and flowers. The 
May pole was brought in from the forest with 
great ceremony. It was usually some tall 
tree stripped of its branches and leaves, ex- 
cept a tuft at the summit, and covered from 
top to bottom with leaves and flowers. It 
was drawn by several yokes of oxen likewise 
adorned with garlands. When brought to 
the midst of the gay throng it was decked 
still further with handkerchiefs and flags and 
set up amid loud huzzas. Bowers were erected 
near it, in which the elders feasted, while the 
youths and maidens, fantastically adorned with 
bells and ribbons, and accompanied by a pseudo 
Robin Hood and Maid Marian, skipped about 
the May pole in the mad whirl of the morris 
dance. The fairest maiden was chosen Queeii. 
o' the May, and who doubts that during her 
ephemeral reign Elizabeth herself might have 
envied her. 

In London the principal May pole was 
placed in Cornhill, before the church of St. 
Andrew, which it overtopped by several feet. 
But in the "troublous times" of Charles I., 
the jealous eye of Parliament fell upon the 
flower-decked May pole, and they denounced 
it as a modern Ashtoreth. Reminded also, by 
the oxen and garlands, of the idolatrous offer- 
ing of the Lystrians to Paul and Barnabas, 



they issued an ordinance in 1644 prohibiting 
the erection of Maj^ poles and the accompany- 
ing ceremonies. 

But the memory of the day still remained 
in the minds of the people. Dickens says : 
" The observance of May was one of the 
ancient peculiarities of our national character 
which required an essential change of manners 
to eradicate." That English manners have 
not " essentially changed," we infer from the 
fact that a shadow of the ancient observance 
yet exists among Americans. 

This shadow often assumes strange forms, 
by no means indicative of the substance. In 
the sunny South, where the climatic influences 
of May most resemble those of England, 
attempts are sometimes made to reproduce the 
old-time gayeties; in New York City the 
wealth of the poor is displayed in the streets, 
and is said to present a moving spectacle even 
to the misanthropist; in our rural districts 
many a Frau Margret, with her basin and 
scrubbing brush, carries terror to the heart of 
every inmate of her domicile of the genus 
homo, species vir ; in college the Faculty have 
granted that somewhat antiquated petition for 
an adjourn. As a result many of our number 
have made a natural selection of a May queen, 
and now upon some grassy knoll or by some 
purling rill they hold sweet converse with 
Nature and each other. 

Doubtless this is very pleasant ; it is cer- 
tainly romantic, but the practical labors of 
editorial life preclude participation. 



Origin of the word humper. Those who 
combine intemperate habits with a love of 
philology will be interested in the following : 
When tjie Roman Catholic religion was in the 
ascendant in England, the health of the Pope 
was usually drunk in a full glass, immediately 
after dinner. The technical French expres- 
sion for the toast was au hon pere — hence the 
word " Bumper." 



16 



BO WD OlJSf ORIENT. 



THE GENERAL SOCIETIES. 

At this time the " St. Croix Prize Debate " 
once more directs attention to the object for 
which the prize was offered. If the aim be to 
give the people of Brunswick opportunity to 
hear a students' debate, it has been eminently 
successful; if the aim be to arouse the old 
interest in the Athenean and Peucinian Socie- 
ties, then it has as eminently failed. Perhaps 
the failure is a thing to be lamented — we 
think ourselves it is. But how could it do 
otherwise than fail ? The Freshman entering 
college does not find in Athenean and Peucin- 
ian two vigorous active bodies, which he may 
or may not have expected from reading the 
catalogue ; but simply a couple of libraries 
and a polite request to pay three or four dol- 
lars a year, and receive in return the privilege 
of taking out books and voting for paper offi- 
cers. He is not taught that love for the soci- 
eties which the old graduates knew. The 
traditional rivalry between them has long since 
passed away ; and the meetings are so few 
and far between that one scarcely knows to 
which of the two he belongs. But why 
should there be a dozen or twenty meetings a 
year wlien one or two will suffice just as well ? 
There are exactly two meetings a year, one 
about the time of the autumnal equinox, to 
initiate Freshmen, and another about the time 
of the vernal equinox, to elect disputants for 
the St. Croix Debate. It is needless to say 
that benefits would be the fruit if these meet- 
ings should be held oftener than they are. 

It is equally needless to say that such a 
theory will never be practically tested. For 
three years the St. Croix Prize has been offered, 
and if its aim be what we have assumed it to 
be, the attainment seems far away as ever. It 
is a remarkable fact that such is the state of 
things, while second-rate debating clubs are 
of the commonest occurrence. No one can 
count the number of them from the commence- 
ment of his college course to its end. They 
grow up in the night and in the morning they 



pass away. There seems to be a, feeling in the 
college that free debating societies should have 
an existence. This feeling periodically robes 
itself like the ghost of a far-away debate, and 
then appears before some unthinking individ- 
ual to bid him awake the old societies. The 
unfortunate individual is, for the time being, 
regarded as fifty years behind his time. Even 
now an attempt is making for the same object, 
but we see nothing to hinder it from going 
the way of all the earth, and finding its place 
in the long line of its predecessors. Such 
an attempt is made, at proper intervals, 
three or four times a year. It starts up in 
the brain of a few, gives a lonely shriek, flut- 
ters a little, then falls back until the next 
time. When the next time will be no one 
can tell ; but its coming is generally prognos- 
ticated by the same signs, and its going cov- 
ered by the same kind of oblivion. 

For ourselves we have, at length, become 
possessed of a sort of religious awe that keeps 
us from meddling much with the dead ; and 
Athenean and Peucinian have slept so long 
and well that we are willing to say at last, 
" Sleep on, now, and take your rest." In other 
colleges such organizations have died without 
a murmur. If only the next Commencement 
would officially declare that these are dead, 
perhaps the " passing away " at Bowdoin will 
be quite as peaceful. 



Some one has said that human nature is a 
curious thing. "We are inclined to believe it. 
With what inconsistency it impels us to lavish 
praise on those who invent the most specious 
fictions to the utter disregard of others far 
more deserving. The dictionary-maker seems 
to us the most slighted among authors. He 
must pass his life among black-letter tomes 
and musty old parchments to bring forth a 
work that only a few will read with the " spirit 
and understanding also." How many of his 
roots, many of painful extraction from obscure 



BOWBOIN OBIENT. 



17 



tongues, are like those out of dry ground — 
continually passed by, never regarded ! How 
many of his extracts and illustrations are lost 
upon humanity ! Yet they must all exist in 
his work, for if he ventures to leave out a sin- 
gle one it always happens — is it chance ? — 
to be the very example we want. If any one 
disbelieves this let him tear a half dozen leaves 
from his dictionary and try it. Then after the 
results of these years of toil are embodied in 
book form we grumble at the price and forget 
there was an author. 

For our part we never take up a Greek or 
Latin lexicon without thinking of it as a tomb 
in which the author has buried his literary 
life ; and ofttimes our emotions so overpower 
us that we would fain close the book and lay 
it away to rest. Poor lexicographer ! 



Some one sa3's the title of Browning's new 
poem reads something like this : " Red Cotton 
Night Cap Country; a Turf and Towers." 
This reminds us of a humorous book, published 
in England a short time ago, in which occurs 
the following recipe for making " Browning " : 
Take rather a coarse view of things in gen- 
eral. In the midst of this place a man and a 
woman, his and her ankles tastefully arranged 
on a slice of Italy, or the country about Por- 
nie. Cut an opening across the breast of each, 
until the soul becomes visible, but be very 
careful that none of the body be lost during 
the operation. Pour into each breast as much 
as it will hold of the new strong wine of love ; 
and for fear they should take cold by expos- 
ure, cover them quickly up with a quantity of 
obscure classical quotations, a few familiar 
allusions to an unknown period of history, 
and a half-destroyed fresco by an early mas- 
ter, varied now and then with a reference to 
the fugues or toccatas of a quite forgotten 
composer. If the poem be still intelligible, 
take a pen and remove carefully all the neces- 
sary articles. 



In the time of Cromwell, when the secta- 
rian spirit ran high, and bitter pamphleteer- 
ing took the place of the stump speaking of 
to-daj", the following were among some of 
the quaint and expressive titles those out- 
spoken authors delighted in : " A Shot Aimed 
at the Devil's Headquarters through the 
Tube of the Canon of the Covenant"; "High- 
heeled Shoes for Dwarfs in Holiness " ; 
" Hooks and Eyes for Behever's Breeches " ; 
"Matches Lighted by the Divine Fire" "The 
Snuffers of Divine Love" "The Spiritual 
Mustard-Pot to make the Soul Sneeze with 
Devotion " ; "A Most Delectable Sweet Per- 
fumed Nosegay for God's Saints to Smell At." 



TVTiy did the snow keep falliug ? 

What did the March -winds say ? 
And why, when Earth was a-flowering 
■Was April showering, and showering ? 

I Icnow — I know to-day ! 

The apple blossoms have told me, 
And the twinkling dew on the spray, 

They wanted to change their places. 

And, putting on shining faces, 
To be the beautiful May ! 

— Hen'ky Eichards, in May Aldine. 



For fifty years Germany has founded no 
new university, but devoted all its educational 
energies to improvement and reform in those 
already existing. We venture no opinion, 
but merely ask the question, would it not be 
well for American educators to learn from 
this example ? 



EPITAPH ON A GOODY. 

Time, like a broom, has swept away 
Her who of old did sweep like time; 
And she now makes her bed in clay, 
"Who once cta^med a Aim^per diem. 
Her sins are washed away, we trust. 
Although she ne'er believed in trusting j 
And she at length has gone to dust, 
Who in her life was always dusting. 

— Advocate. 



18 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOm ORIENT. 



PUBLISHED EVEKY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DUE- 
ING THE COLLEGIATE YEAB AT 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE, 
By the Class of 1874. 

EDITORS. 

S. V. Cole, L. H. Kimball, 

W. T. GooDALE, D. 0. S. Lowell, 

F. W. Hawthorne, F. K. Wheeler, 

H. K. White. 

Teems — $2 00 a year in advance; single copies, 
15 cents. 

Address communications to Bowdoin Orient, 
Brunswick, Maine. 

For sale at 7 Appleton Hall, Bowdoin College. 
Also by J. Griffin and B. G. Dennison, Brunswick ; 
and A. Williams & Co., 135 Washington St., Boston. 



CONTENTS. 
Vol. III., No. 2.— May 14, 1873. 

Reminiscences 13 

May Day 15 

The General Societies '. 16 

Editorial - 18 

Local 19 

Alumni Record 22 

College News 23 



The Class of '74 on assuming charge of 
the Oeient increased the number of editors 
from five to seven. That tlie change was 
prompted by wisdom and authorized by expe- 
rience, all agree. But we do earnestly protest 
against the idea that the responsibility was 
thus entirely shifted to their shoulders. While 
we are editors we are also students and men. 

In the first capacity we have to write, in 
the second we must study, and in the last we 
are subject to that hereditary disability that 
we cannot " do two things at once." There- 



fore, as a matter of necessity, do we ask for 
contributions and help of any and every de- 
scription, from students, faculty, alumni and 
friends. We trust all who have an interest in 
Bowdoin's welfare will help us. To the Alum- 
ni of the College we extend a special invita- 
tion. Upon you we make a special claim. 
You have passed from these walls and are out 
battling with real life. To us who now fill 
the places you once filled, and are soon to 
grasp the weapons you will lay down, your 
reminiscences, j^our opinions, are of especial 
value and interest. To the Faculty and to 
our fellow students we can only repeat the 
invitation so often extended before, to avail 
themselves of this means of intercommunica- 
tion of thought. 

We think it has been the aim of the Ori- 
ent in the past, and we are sure it will be in 
the future, to become the miner of Bowdoin 
sentiment, the reservoir of Bowdoin ideas. 

We wish that our paper should not only 
possess general merit but be a perfect repre- 
rentative of our College in the catalogue of 
college journals. Seven men chosen from one 
class cannot effect this. We must rely on 
both teachers and students to accomplish it. 
We therefore cordially invite a free and unfet- 
tered discussion of any and every topic, on 
the part of all connected with the College, in 
the columns of the Orient. Here it is that 
reforms should be demanded. Here it is that 
improvements should be suggested. Here it 
is that the wisdom of old institutions should 
be defended. Here it is that every depart- 
ment of our College should be invaded and 
examined, every abuse laid bare, every excel- 
lence lauded. It is time that every barrier to 
the free interchange of opinion between stu- 
dents and Faculty was entirely broken down, 
and if the Orient could be an instrument 
in this reform our purpose would be accom- 
plished. We are ambitious to become the 
medium through which the views of all con- 
cerned, from the President down to the " end- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



19 



woman," may fiad expression and have effect. 
And we appeal to the Faculty to take the 
initiative in this. Is it presumptuous or ego- 
tistical to say that when they help us they 
help themselves ? 

Nor is this desire a strange and preposter- 
ous one. The great majority of our college 
papers are sustained largelj^, and some mainly, 
by contributions. It was not long since that 
William Cullen Bryant, the patriarcli of Amer- 
ican literature, wrote a poem for the Williams 
Vidette. The Orient has had far too little 
assistance from tlie Alumni and friends in the 
past. We trust this appeal will not be un- 
heeded. 

We have had in contemplation an increase 
in the size of the Oriext from sixteen to 
twenty pages. Witliout tlais assistance it can 
not be done. 



That hyena which has been invisibly roam- 
ing up and down the campus, for tlae last 
month or two, seeking whom he may devour, 
regularly quarters himself about meal-time in 
the region of tlie Reading Room. His meal- 
times adjust themselves to the time-table of 
mail trains, and tlie food he can subsist on is 
certainly surprising. For instance, he watches 
from some unseen nook to see tlie mail matter 
come up from the office, and after it has been 
safely deposited in the Reading Room, he 
comes snuffing about with his long literary 
snout, to see whether any new magazines be 
in the wind. If he finds such is the case — 
and his literary acumen, as well as his taste, 
is of the highest order — he brings his capa- 
cious mouth to bear on the Atlantic, Harper's, 
Scriiner's, or anything of the sort, and with 
eyes shut, swallows them all at a single gulp. 
No tear of his follows the exertion, though 
manjr a poor student comes weeping from the 
scene, thinking of the things he will never see 
again. Not only magazines suffer, but news- 
papers of the higher order, without distinc- 



tion of politics, find their way into the same 
remarkable stomach : stories large and stories 
small, theological discussions, theories, bones 
and all, are swallowed up together. Even 
those Uttle inoffensive papers, whose humble 
literary standing does not ensure their imme- 
diate destruction, show marks of dirty paws 
and scornful treatment. 

Only think of it ! How long shall beasts 
destroy the food of men ? Where is the man 
who dare tackle the h}" ena ? 



We think we may say at last, with that 
degree of confidence which no new snow storm 
will contradict, that spring has decided to set- 
tle among us and spend the remainder of her 
natural life in quietude and peace. The 
campus begins to show signs of an innate 
greenness, and trees are putting forth little 
prophecies of what is to be. The muddy sea- 
son has come and gone, followed bj' the usual 
curses of young Freshmen. We, who are 
more experienced in cursing, know better this 
time, for when the next season comes upon 
us we might repent in dust — we have the 
ashes now. It is really quite amusing to see 
what effect the annual ash heap does have 
when distributed along the College walks. 
AU walking upon it is carefully avoided for 
the first few days, and each path becomes two 
separate individuals. 



LOCAL. 



" What did I say ? " 

Winthrop sighs for gas. 

Expect the " Nurt " soon. 

Those loaded canes are popular. 

Massachusetts is rejoicing in a coat of red. 

The Freshmen are much agitated about a 
class cane. 



20 



BOWDOIN OBIENT. 



" The boys " have discarded him who 
burned the hedge. 

No man of taste can pass Phillie's foun- 
tain these warm afternoons. 

The " Delta " is resounding once more 
with the shouts of base-ballists. 

And now some one has dubbed the Medics, 
" Modocs.'' Alas, poor Medics ! 

That sallow-faced repairer of shattered 
umbrellas must be the most hopeful of mortals. 

The reception on May evening, by the 
" class of '70," B. H. S., was a very pleasant 
affair. 

The" alley" is becoming a favorite even- 
ing promenade. 'Tis there " the band begins 
to play." 

A "funny" Sophomore briefly described 
the recent Atlantic disaster as " quite a sur- 
prise party to the Lord." 

That day of all days in '73's calendar, 
April 30th, was celebrated by them with ap- 
propriate ceremonies. Full particulars in our 
next. 

"We are glad to welcome Prof. Goodale, 
who has returned to Bowdoin once more. 
He has been lecturing at Harvard for some 
months ^sast. 

If any of our readers should " happen in " 
at the Vienna Exposition, they will find a 
copy of the Orient in the collection of 
American publications. 

Through the influence of some public- 
spirited Juniors, the whole college enjoyed an 
" adjourn " on May Day. The livery stables 
reaped a rich harvest in consequence. 

At the last meeting of the Athenean So- 
ciety, C. J. Palmer was elected Treasurer, 
vice H. Johnson resigned. The books are 
now arranged after the manner of the college 
library, and present a much neater appearance. 



Prof. Morse's lectures to the Juniors, on 
Natural Historjr, are exceedingly interesting. 
Many of the Seniors avail themselves of the 
privilege of hearing them for the second time. 

Quite a number are pursuing optional 
studies this term. Prof. Sewall has a class in 
the Greek of Plato, Prof. Chapman a class 
in the Latin of Tacitus, and Prof. Young a 
class in Italian. 

When men who have passed by that par- 
donable period of Sophomoric revels, indulge 
in maudlin midnight shrieks under Seniors' 
windows, their conduct will excuse them from 
any further participation in the "set up " drill. 

Prof. Young is giving the Juniors a series 
of interesting lectures on Philology every 
Monday morning. We think it a good plan, 
for an obvious reason, that as little study as 
possible be required for Monday morning ex- 
ercises. 

The 41st annual convention of the Alpha 
Delta Phi Fraternity will be held under the 
auspices of the Cornell Chapter on the 14th 
and 15th of May. G. E. Hughes, L. H. Kim- 
ball and S. M. Carter are delegates from the 
Bowdoin Chapter. 

The 29th annual convention of the Delta 
Kappa Epsilon Fraternity will be held with 
the Gamma Phi Chapter at Middletown, 
Conn., on the 14th and 15th of May. The 
delegates from Bowdoin are A. F. Moulton 
and J. F. Elliot. 

The College Nine have received a chal- 
lenge from the Hebron Academy Nine, and 
also an invitation from Dartmouth, to make 
some arrangements for playing that third 
game of the " old series." As yet, no action 
has been taken on either. 

The military drill has commenced once 
more. At present each company drills twice 
a week, once in artillery and once in infantry. 
Fridays the commissioned and non-commis- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



21 



sioned officers have a lecture or recitation in 
Upton's Military Tactics. 

The appointments of competitors for the 
" '68 Prize" were made public on Wednesday 
morning. Those chosen are Blake, Elliot, 
Herrick, INIoulton, Walker and Wilson. The 
exhibition will take place on the evening of 
Monday, June 2d. 

A Freshman the other day, reciting Horace 
in the society of a " pony " leaf and a guilty 
conscience, was asked by the Tutor^^with ref- 
erence to the text, if he had '■'■pones." As 
his cheeks quickly assumed the shade of 
Weale's classics, the Tutor apologized for ask- 
ing him before the class, adding that he was 
unaware that he was so sensitive. 

The wild, uncouth, oft erring, but ever 
mirthful " Bones " is again on the campus. 
This sable bundle of eccentricities returns as 
regularly as sjDring ; he finds the Freshmen 
his warmest admirers, and for them he shouts 
and " rattles " all day long. We would sug- 
gest to the songster that he prepare some new 
music. " Josephus " and " Don't marry any 
other," are good songs, but grow stale in a 
few decades. iv 

As numerous vacancies among the officers 
of the Battalion are soon to be caused by the 
departure of the Seniors, the soldierly bear- 
ing, faultless dress and glittering arms of the 
Juniors impart a ludicrous transparency to 
their motives. One impulsive youth, acting 
on a classical model, has engaged his " end- 
woman " to polish his armor. This dilapidated 
Venus, clad in calico "long-short," may daily 
be seen, vigorously applying whiting and 
chamois-skin, while the gentle Mars, seated 
in his easy chair, pipe in mouth, contemplates 
her jute switch through "neutral tint" eye 
glasses. 

The public Debate for the St. Croix Prize 
took place in Lemont Hall, on the evening of 
May 6th. The question, " Should the present 



right of suffrage in this country be limited by 
qualifications of Property and Education?" 
was argued in the affirmative by INIessrs. Wis- 
well. Berry and Ferguson, representing the 
Peucinian Societj^; and in the negative by 
Messrs. MerriU, Hughes and Chapman, repre- 
senting the Athenean. The speakers all pre- 
sented their arguments m a manner clear and 
forcible, retaining the attention of the audi- 
ence throughout the entire discussion. The 
committee of award, without much difficultj^ 
selected Chapman as the victor, and pro- 
nounce this decision as just. The object of 
this prize was to awaken an interest in the 
general societies in matters of debate, and it 
is to be regretted that those who offered it 
have thus far been disappointed. 

A meeting of the Bowdoin Boating Asso- 
ciation was held Saturday morning. May 3d, 
in the Senior recitation room. Owing to the 
late posting of the notice, and in part to the 
rain, only thirty or forty assembled. Com- 
modore Ladd presided, and first called for the 
report of the finance committee. Mr. Board- 
man, in behalf of the committee, gave a very 
encouraging account of their labors, conclud- 
ing by stating that only $600 more were 
needed to complete the fund for sending our 
crew to the Springfield Regatta. Mr. Sar- 
gent, captain of the Six, spoke of the strength 
of the crew, and their chances for victory, 
immediatel}' after which, Mr. Hatch presented 
the subscription paper to the meeting ; among 
the few present nearly three hundred dollars 
were raised, with three-fourths of the College 
yet to be seen. This is a very good begin- 
ing, and insures the representation of Bowdoin 
at the Regatta. Our crew is a strong one, and 
is hard at work ; the sliding seats, recently 
adopted, give entire satisfaction. Elliot, of 
New York, is building the boat in which they 
will puU at the race. 



Beware of the man who always agrees with 
you, for he is either a fool or a flatterer. 



22 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



ALUMNI BEG ORB. 



[We earnestly request contributions for this 
department from tlie Alumni and friends of the 
College.] 

'26.— Dr. John T. GUman of Portland 
has just returned from a tour in Florida. 

'34. — The many friends of the Rev. Dr. 
Henry B. Smith of the Union Theological 
Seminary, will learn of his serious illness with 
deep regret. He is suffering from mental and 
physical prostration, the result of excessive 
application to his work. 

'37.— Hon. L. D. M. Sweat of Portland, 
leaves for a tour in Europe next mouth. 

'37. — Rev. George W. Field, d.d., of Ban- 
gor, sailed for Europe last week in company 
with his brother Edward M. Field, m.u., of 
the class of '45. 

'50. — Professor Charles 'C. Everett of 
Cambridge, has been selected by the Phi 
Beta Kappa Society of Brown University, as 
their orator at the approaching anniversary. 

'55. — Thomas H. Little, Superintendent of 
the Wisconsin Institution for Education of the 
Blind, sailed in the Sarmatia on Saturday, 2d, 
for Europe. He is sent by his Institution to 
examine European methods of education of 
the blind, and is also commissioned to repre- 
sent his State at the Vienna Exposition. 

'61.— Dr. Theodore D. Bradford of New 
York City, formerly of Auburn, Me., has just fin- 
ished a valuable course of lectures before the 
Homoeopathic Medical College, for which the 
Faculty tendered him a special vote of thanks. 

'61. — Lieutenant Albion Howe of the 
4th United States Artillery, was killed in 
the recent fight with the Modocs. He was 
the son of Col. Marshall Howe of the regular 
army, and a nephew of Gen. A. P. Howe. 
He was born in Florida, where his father was 
then stationed, in 1838. Entering Bowdoin 
in 1857, he graduated in 1861. He then 



studied law in the offices of Hon. E. R. Wig- 
gin of Saco, and of Hon. John M. Good- 
win of Biddeford. In December, 1863, he 
entered the 14th New York Artillery as 2d 
Lieutenant. Soon he obtained a staff appoint- 
ment, and rose to the rank of Major of Vol- 
unteers. At the close of the war he entered 
the Custom House, Boston, remaining there 
until 1866, when he was commissioned 2d 
Lieutenant in the 4th Artillery. In Novem- 
ber, 1869, he was promoted to a 1st Lieuten- 
antcy. Meanwhile he had been breveted 
Lieutenant-Colonel of Volunteers, and Cap- 
tain in the regular army for gallantry dui-ing 
the war. For the past few years he has been 
stationed on the Pacific coast, where he was 
killed by the Indians. He was a man of much 
personal courage and of excellent abilities, 
one who made strong attachments, and one 
who was everywhere a favorite with his com- 
rades. He is the second recent Bowdoin 
graduate to fall by the hands of the Indians. 
The first having been Lieutenant Frederick 
Beecher of the class of 1862, who was killed 
some years ago on the plains. 

'66. — Dr. F. H. Gerrish has just concluded 
a very successful course of lectures upon Ma- 
teria Medica in the Maine Medical School. 

'69. — Thomas H. Eaton, formerly with the 
Burlington and Missouri River Railroad, in 
Iowa, has gone to Madison, Wisconsin to ac- 
cept a position in the First National Bank. 

'72. — Warren F. Bickford is at present 
supplying the Congregational churches of Pat- 
ten and Island Falls. 



We can conceive how interesting it might 
be to witness a burglary, or a hanging, or an 
amputation, the latter in full flow, with plen- 
ty of sawing and pails full of gore — "all in 
actual operation" — but what it can be to the 
public to see an editor drop their " rejected 
communications " into a waste basket, is in- 
conceivable. — Rejporter. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



23 



COLLEGE NEWS. 



Cornell, in one week, raised nearly $1,500 
for boating. 

Brown has relieved students from com- 
pulsory attendance at church on the Sabbath. 

Why is the new play at the Museum like 
the jokes in the Yale Lit. ? Because it's " A 
Hundred Years Old." — Advocate. 

A Yale Freshman, being treated by a friend 
to a dose of paregoric, pronounced it excellent 
sherry ! That Freshman evidently passed a 
healthy infancy. — Anvil. 

The Record says three Juniors intend 
walking five hundred miles in one week, next 
vacation. Funeral services will be held in 
Philadelphia, Rondout and Rhinebeck. 

Working of the optional system at Dart- 
mouth ; Calculus and Greek are optional dur- 
ing a part of the course. Professor — " R., 
what is the object of studying Calculus ? " 
R. — " To get rid of Greek, sir." — Anvil. 

A North College Freshman captured sev- 
eral mice not long ago. It is said that he now 
sports an impressive scarf manufactured from 
their skins and trimmed with blue silk, which 
is the envy and admiration of every school 
girl in New Haven. — Record. 

A young lady becoming impatient at the 
non-appearance of a recent lecturer, ex- 
claimed, " Oh, dear, I shall fly ! " The Junior 
who attended her, remarked, " Fly into my 
arms, my dear." We understand that the 
flight took place later in the evening, at the 
seminary door. — Madisonends. 

In the elocution department, last term, as 
the class were studying the passions, among 
others, examples of modesty were required. 
Mr. A. gave as his example: — 

" ' stay,' the maiden said, ' and rest 
Thy weaiy head upon this breast ! ' 
A tear stood in his bright blue eye, 
But still ho ansTvered, with a sigh, 
' Eseelsior! ' " 

The professor then asked how modesty was 
expressed in that example. " I think," said 
A., "it was rather modest in him to refuse." 
— Argus. 



TIME TABLE. 
Trains leave Brunswick for — 

Augusta — 8.30 A.M. ; 2.35 and 7,00 p.m. ; 1.50 

A.M. (Pull.) 
Bangor— 2.35 p.m. ; 1.50 A.M. (Pull.) 
Bath — 7.00 and 8.30 a.m. ; 2.30, 5.10 and 7.00 

P.M. 

Boston — 7.33 a.m.; 2.05 and 5.00 p.m. ; 12 M. 

(Pull.) 
Farmington — 2.30 p.m. 
Lewiston — 7.40 a.m. ; 2.30 and 7.00 p.m. 
Portland — 7.33 a.m. ; 2.05 and 5.00 p.m. ; 12 m. 

(Pull.) 
Waterville — 2.35 p.m. ; 1.50 a.m. (Pull.) 



BUSINESS CARDS. 

STKOUT & HOLMES, 
Cor.VSELORS AT LAW, 

No. 88 Middle Street (Canal Bank Building), PORTLAND, ME. 

A. A. STROCT. CEO. F. H0L3IES ('66). 

JOSEPH A. LOCKE (Bowdoin, '66), Attorney and Connsellor at Law, 
74 Middle Street, cor. Exchange Street, PORTLAND. 



JOSIAH n. DRCTIMOND (Colby, '46) Counsellor at Law, 100 Exchange 
street, PORTLAND. 



NOYES, HOLiVIES & COMPANY, 

119 Washington St. and 10 Bromfield St., 
BOSTON, MASS. 

PUBLISHEES AND BOOKSELLERS, 

AND WHOLESALE AXD RETAIL 

STATIONERS, 

AU kinds of COLLEGE AND SCHOOL TEXT BOOKS, and STANDARD 
AND MISCELLANEOUS LITERATURE, supplied at 

LOW PRICES. 

Orders by Mail or Express will receive prompt and careful attention. 
These books may be obtained through J. P. BICKFORD, Agent, No. 21 
Maine Hall. 

DIVINITY SCHOOL OPHAEVAKD UNIYEESITY 

This School is open to persons of all denomv nations. Pecuniary aid is 
afiforded to those who are needy and deserving. 
The next academic year will begin 

SEPTEMBER 26th. 

Further information will be given on application to 

Pbof. outer STEARNS, D.D., 
Or Prof. E. J. YOUNG, 

Cambridge, Mass. 



24 



BOWBOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Classical Department. 

TEEMS OF admission: 

Candidates for admission into the Freshman Class are examined as fol- 
lows : — 

Harkness'a Latin Grammar, including Prosody, Parts I. and II. Hark- 
ness's Introduction to Latin Prose Composition; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the ^neid; Cicero's Select Orations; Sallust. 

Hadley's or Goodwin's Greek Grammar; Goodwin's Greek Reader; or 
Xenophon's Anabasis, 4 books, and Homer's Hiad, 2 books. 

Arithmetic; Algebra, to equations of the second degree; Davies's 
Legendre's Geometry, first and third books. 

English Grammar; Ancient and Modern Geography. 

Scientific Department. 

TEUMS OF ADMISSION. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the following subjects : — 
Mathematics — Arithmetic, including Common and Decimal Frac- 
tions, Interest, and Square Root; Algebra, to Equations of the 
Second Degree; Geometry, Books I, and HI. of Davies's Ls- 
gendre. 
Geography — Political Geography, and simple elements of Astrono- 
mical and Physical Geography. 
History — Leading facts in general History, and especially in Ameri- 
can History. 
Latin — Allen's Latin Grammar, or the equivalent. 
English — The examination will consist in 1st, Reading aloud a pas- 
sage from some standard author, with explanations of gram- 
matical construction, and definition and derivation of words; 2d, 
Writing a few sentences in English, on some familiar subject, 
reference bsing had to spelling and punctuation as well as to 
composition; 3d Correction, of ungrammatical sentences com- 
posed for the purpose. 
All candidates for admission must produce certificates of their good 
moral character. 

The time for admission is the Friday after Commencement, and the 
first Thursday of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants may be 
examined at other times. 



Courses of Study. 

The regular course of Instruction is that commended by the leading 
colleges of the country as eminently adapted_to secure liberal culture. 

THE SCIENTIFIC COURSE 

has been recently organized. Thirty-four students have already entered, — 
a fact which indicates that the College has been successful in its effort to 
meet the demand for a liberal course of study which shall at the same 
time look tawards the actual uses and appUcations of knowledge. 

The studies pursued in this course are comprised in the following: — 
Languages — English one year, and optional two ; Latin one year, 
optional three ; French one year, optional three ; German one 
year, optional two ; Spanish, Italian, Swedish, Anglo-Saxon, one 
year. 
Mathematics — Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, Mensuration, 
Spherical Trigonometry, Analytical Geometry ; Differential and 
Integral Calculus, with the application of these to Sm'veying, 
Navigation, Projections, DialUng, Levelling, Astronomy, Mechan- 
ics, Topographical and Hydrogi'aphical Engineering. 
Natural History — Geology, Mineralogy, Botany, Zoology, with their 
relations to the Industrial Arts. 



Natural Philosophy — Mechanics, Hydrodynamics, Pneumatics, 
Optics, Astronomy, Light, Heat, Electricity, &c. 

Chemistry — In all its branches and applications. 

History and Political Science — General, Medieval and Modern His- 
tory, PoUtical Economy, General Principles of Law, Interna 
tional Law, Law of Evidence, Constitution of United States, 
Theory of Government, American Law. 

Philosophy — Rhetoric, Logic, Psychology, Metaphysics, Evidences 
of Natural and Revealed Religion, Ethics, Esthetics. 

The studies of the first two years are common throughout the Depart- 
ment and are intended to lay a broad and substantial foundation for all 
branches of subsequent study. In the last two years the studies are 
arranged in distinct courses, in accordance with certain leading objects : a 
general scientific culture, or special technical skill. Attention is particu- 
larly invited to the faciUties oflered for the thorough study of Civil Engi- 
neering. 



A rO ST- GRADUATE COURSE 



which Instruction will be given in 



of two years is also commenced, i 
the following schools: — 

I. Letters — Comprising Languages, Ancient and Modern (includ- 
ing the Oriental) with their literatures ; Philology ; Rhetoric ; 
Logic ; History ; Elocution ; the Fine Arts. This leads to the 
degree of Master of Arts. 

n. Science — Advanced Mathematics, Physics, Natural History and 
Chemistry, in their uses and appUcations. This leads to the 
degree of Doctor of Science. 

m. Philosophy — Comprising the above, considered in their reasons 
and relations ; Psychology, Metaphysics, Ethics, Esthetics ; Poli- 
tics ; Theory of Government, Constitutional History, Principles 
of Law, International Law. Leading to the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy. 

IV. Medicine ^The Medical School of Maine. Degree, — M. D. 

Students who are not graduates will be received on satisfactory evi- 
dence of proficiency in study which will enable them to profit by this 
Com-se. 

Much and careful attention is given to Physical Culture under the train- 
ing of accompUshed Instructors. The Gymnasium is well provided with 
approved apparatus, and the opportunities for Military di*ill and discipUne 
are of the very best. 

It is but just to say that good morals and manliness are distinguishing 
features of college life at Bowdoln. 

The Library of Bowdoin is one of rare value, and the choicest works 
are constantly added. The Gallery of Paintings is well known to be one of 
the most remarkable in the country. The Cabinet and apparatus are 
ample for their purpose. 

The annual expenses are, for tuition, &c., $90. Board S2.50 and $4.00 
a week. Pecuniary assistance, from the income of thirty scholarships and 
various other benefactions, is rendered to those who are unable fully to 
meet their expenses otherwise. 

Commencement July 10th. Examination for admission July 12th and 
Aug. 28th, at 9 a.m. 

First term begins Aug. 28th, at evening. 

Every encouragement will be given to persons who desire to pursue 
any study taught in the College. 

The town of Brunswick, situated on tide water^the Androscoggin River 
on one side and the Ocean on the other ; already a seat of various manu- 
factures and destined to become one of the principal railroad centres of the 
State, easy also of access from all quarters, — presents an excellent locality 
for scientific as well as literary pursuits, while the facilities afforded by 
Bowdoin College, its Libraries, Galleries of Art, Cabinets, Scientific Col- 
lections, Laboratories, and Apparatus, offer great inducements to the ear- 
nest student of the Useful and Liberal Arts. 



Vol. hi. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MAY 28, 1873. 



No. 3. 



SACKCLOTH AXD ASHKS. 

O'er ball aud campus hung the night, 
Tju April moon deuied her light. 

Gleamed through the trees a ray uncertaiu 
From lights behind a 'Winthrop curtain. 

Two " bamuiiug " Freshmen, blithe and merry, 
Had there been quaffing " opt." brown sherry, 

Which from his sister's wedding feast 

The host had "nigged'' and brought " Down East.' 

But, startled at the stroke of two. 
The guest to potations bid adieu. 

Rushed from those walls of classic bricks 
This wine-flushed son of Seventy-six, 

Clad in a suit of worsted fine, 

Kuown to the trade as "Scheldt's Straight-line." 

From Sodom to the chapel door, 
"Where heaps of ashes near a score, 

"Whicli Muir at the break of day 
"Would lerel to a broad pathway. 

His "haud-seweds " on the first pile tripped. 
And in the filth this Freshman slipped. 

"Strange," thought he, musing on his plight, 
"I didn't think I was so tight." 

"While musing thus and sorely vexed, 
He tumbles headlong on the next; 

And fearing worse things if he halts, 
Eeeps up the undulatory waltz. 

'Merging at length from pile eighteen, 
Long ho surveys the College green. 

Striving with maudlin thoughts in vain 
Those undulations to explain. 

Aurora, she of rosy cheek. 

Found this poor Freshman wan aud weak. 



Shambling, with gait than snail's no faster, 
To view the scene of his disaster. 

Clove to his heel a sardine box. 
And mud besmeared his sunny locks. 

Streaked o'er his linen, once so white, 
"Were charred remains of anthracite. 

But, Muir, deft with classic spade, 
Had of those mounds a level made; 

And, as good Master Bates had planned, 
Had spread the surface o'er with sand ; 

So, when the path the Freshman viewed, 
His former trouble was renewed. 

His wavij waits from hill to hill, 

To his dull niiud was marvelous still. 

Theories wild shot through his brain. 
But failed the puzzle to explain. 

Chagrin to desperation drove — 

" Tremens ! by the green-eyed Jove ! " 

"With this conjecture satisfied. 
Straight to his room this " P. B." hied ; 

Seized " Griffith Gaunt" aud thereon swore 
That sherry wine he'd drink no more ; 

Tore irom his back the suit of blue. 
And, next day, sold it to a Jew ; 

Selecting from the Israelite's stoi'e, 
A bust of Bacchus — nothing more. 

Sheny's a mild and harmless j uice, 
But not designed for Freshmen's use ; 
But, if perchance, they're led to think 
That on " occasions " they must drink. 
Ale (Bass or Adam's) will suffice — 
Both known preventatives of vice. 



E. S. 



26 



BOWBOIN ORIENT. 



"Written for the Orient. 

REMINISCENCES. 
II. 

We will now return to the purchase of 
the telescope. 

The old sun dial also came in for its share 
of honor in contributing to the common weal, 
as the indispensable regulator of the clock. 
As the obliquity of the style is to be measured 
by the latitude of the place where the dial is 
to be located, the latitude of course must be 
first ascertained. This was done, but by 
which method I would not say, perhaps by 
both, i. e. : First, the artificial horizon, and 
secondly, by going down to the salt water, 
where a good water level and meridian alti- 
tude of the sun was practicable. If the lat- 
ter process was used, a few triangles would 
give the latitude of old Massachusetts Hall. 
"When the sun dial reached Brunswick the 
telescope came also, I think upon the same 
day, and my impression is it was on the same 
invoice, and it was a bright sunny day late in 
October or the first of November. After 
taking it out of the box and wiping the dust 
off, my father sat it down in the sun, opposite 
a south window in the old chapel library, its 
position being such as to indicate the precise 
time, which was half-past one. It was then a 
highly polished and beautiful instrument, and 
the style had been adjusted to represent the 
axis of the earth, to wit: 43° 43' of north 
latitude. 

The great lunar eclipse, which was to take 
place the following January, now became the 
all-absorbing subject of thought in College. 
The class which was to graduate in 1806 was 
in its Junior year, and every soul in it was 
laboriously and earnestly intent on the prob- 
lem, and making himself familiar with the 
modus operandi of its solution. All of the 
appliances were at hand, and forthwith meas- 
ures wei'e taken for making them available. 
A large wooden post was set deep in the 
ground and the sun dial secured so as to give 



the true sun time for twelve o'clock for the 
meridian of Bowdoin College. There may be 
some yet living in Brunswick who remember 
John Davis, who was a member of the first 
graduating class. He had a large share of 
mechanical genius, of very good common 
sense and practical tact. For five or six 
years before he came to college he had work- 
ed at the clock- and watch-maker's trade. 
Some years after. Professor Cleaveland em- 
ployed him in constructing philosophical 
apparatus and to assist him in preparing ex- 
periments for his chemical lectures. This 
man my father enlisted in the service of train- 
ing the clock (our own Wellard clock) and 
through this drill it was brought to measure 
time, as the tap of the drum the march of a 
military body, the hands of the clock, under 
the disciplinary regulations of Mr. John 
Davis, keeping step as if the chronometer or 
clock were the shadow of the sun dial. 

In those primitive days of Bowdoin the 
newspaper was not the power in the country 
which it now is, and that irrepressible insti- 
tution, "Our Own Correspondent," had no 
existence. But, notwithstanding, the fact of 
the arrival of our big telescope became ex- 
tensively known abroad, and its fame and 
great power (magnifying about 600, 1 think,) 
duly appreciated, and more than this, greatly 
exaggerated. There was a most unbounded 
expectation of great results. Olbers of Bre- 
men, and Herschel in England, had achieved 
some of the greatest wonders of the age. 
The former had discovered several asteroids, 
as they are called, or inferior planets, between 
the orbits of Mars and Jupiter, — Herschel, 
however, going outside of this picket guard 
of asteroids, by means of his big telescope, 
and bej^'ond the supposed boundaries of the 
solar system, penetrated so far into the regions 
of unknown space, as to discover the planet 
which bears his name. These discoveries 
when I was a boy had aroused the attention 
and expectation of the whole civilized world ; 



BO WD OIN ORIENT. 



27 



and people were asking each other what 
would be coming next? Had Le Verrier 
then, as he has since, announced the existence 
of Neptune, before he or any mortal man had 
seen it, solely upon the ground of a philo- 
sophical necessity to account for certain 
erratic movements in the solar system, it 
would have been considered either the result 
of immediate inspiration or possession of a 
power of logical induction which might in 
the coming future vouchsafe an assurance of 
still further dispensations to draw us nearer 
and nearer to the great fountain of light. 

On the eventful day before the eclipse the 
weather was intensely cold. The thermometer 
I'anged from 30^ minus to 34° minus. Dr. 
Vaughan having been invited with his familj', 
to visit us for the oecasion, thought it too 
severely cold for them to make the attempt, 
but came himself in Col. Estabrook's stage, 
packed in buffalo robes. There were other 
strangers in town from Belfast and Portland, 
and other towns east and west from that vast 
terra incognita then known as the District of 
Maine. I feel strongly assured that this 
eclipse occurred in vacation, and quite a 
number of the college students of the then 
upper class, or Juniors, were- present and 
were efficient in rendering assistance. The 
telescope, which was a Gregorian concave 
reflector and of about 600 magnifying power, 
was mounted on its brass-mounted but wood- 
en tripod, about nine o'clock in the evening. 
The preceding day the snow and ice were 
cleared from the spot selected for the mount- 
ing of the telescope, and this spot was in the 
south yard of the house, say a couple of hun- 
dred of feet southwest from the Thorndike 
oak. The clock was in the study, northeast 
corner and lower story, and in the southeast 
corner of the study. Close by the clock was 
the door into the entry, the kitchen further 
on, and the kitchen window open, so that a 
person standing by the clock could see the 
telescope, which was about fifty feet distant 



and just south from the clock. The eclipse 
was expected about half past two o'clock 
A.M. Half-an-hour before that time quite a 
large number of ladies and gentlemen be- 
gan to assemble, and everything went on as 
merrily as a marriage festival, especially out 
of doors, as it was necessary to keep in active 
motion to save one from perishing. A jingle 
of sleigh bells brought a double sleigh, and in 
it were Dr. Vaughan's two sons, William and 
Petty. Although very cold, they were as 
lively as crickets, and in ten minutes were as 
good as new. Disappointed in not coming 
with their fother, and desirous of seeing the 
telescope and the eclipse, and participating 
in the excitement so natural to the young, 
instead of going to bed, the younger chal- 
lenged the elder brother to join him, and 
harness up the double sleigh and come to 
Brunswick. The challenge was instantly 
accepted, and in less than a half-hour they 
were coursing over the road. Grand moon- 
light, grand sleighing, the boys in grand spir- 
its, and the cold about as intense as an arctic 
winter could make it. They never stopped 
save for a minute at a time to let the horses 
take breath, but drove straight through Litch- 
field and Bowdoin. Occasionally one or the 
other would get out and run a few rods to 
warm himself, but neither suffered any harm. 
It was upon this night that the imperfec- 
tion in the tripod-mounting of the telescope 
was first discovered, which has ever since 
condemned this noble instrument to more 
than sixty years of total darkness and igno- 
minious neglect. The telescope has a mag- 
nifying power, I think, of about 600. Of 
course any unsteadiness or jar of the instru- 
ment would be multiplied in the same propor- 
tion. The tripod resting on the frozen ground 
communicated this trembling (insensible in 
itself), but with a multiplier of 600 it gave to 
the moon's disc a degree of tremulousness that 
would entirely defeat the recognition of the 
moment of contact of the earth's shadow. 



28 



BOWDOIN OBIENT. 



It is well our little Gregorian of a multiplying 
capacity of 75 was at hand, and its service 
was made available. The result was satisfac- 
tory. The longitude thus determined was 
subsequently verified on several occasions, 
and scarcely differs from the calculations of 
Prof. Bache in 1849. At the time, however, 
it was a subject of great disappointment that 
the expectations raised upon the big telescope 
should be so disastrously brought to grief. 
A disaster of still greater importance than 
that alluded to, so far as related to the imme- 
diate fixing of the longitude of Bowdoin Col- 
lege, came very near happening that night. 
The big telescope, although deserted for the 
small Gregory, was not dismounted from its 
tripod, but left standing in the yard and point- 
ing up into the firmament above, as if medi- 
tating the discomfiture of its little rival, in 
one way, at least, if not in another. No one 
knew precisely the time the eclipse would 
begin at Brunswick ; every one, however, was 
momentarily expecting it. Not a word was 
spoken, the running about to keep warm was 
suspended — as it was thought it might jar 
the ground or the instrument, — breaths were 
scarcely drawn, everybody was looking upon 
the full-orbed moon shining in its greatest 
radiancy, and the atmosphere was perfectly 
transparent; and added to all this the phos- 
phorescent snow-carpet gave to the whole 
scene a closer proximity to daylight than was 
ever known before. Even some, book in hand, 
were reading aloud, until the signal was given 
to hush, so that the men at the clock could 
hear the shout given of "time" when the 
contact occurred. The eye of the obser- 
ver was steadily fixed upon the object-glass 
of the telescope : the seconds seemed slow 
and everybody was impatient to hear the word 
" time " called out. During these moments, a 
boy present, then in the seventh winter of 
his life, attracted by the glare of the highly 
polislied big telescope in the moonlight, softly 
climbed upon a table by the side of the instru- 



ment, and stretching out his tongue to its 
farthest extent, placed it squarely on the 
radiant side which had so much excited his 
admiration. No hungry shark, with irrepress- 
ible greed, ever struck at its victim more im- 
petuously than the polished big telescope, now 
cooled down to 30° minus, seized the whole 
flat surface exposed of this youngster's tongue 
and held it fast in its gripe. The boy gave 
an inarticulate guttural exclamation of dis- 
tress, but his anxious mother, close by, gave 
a loud shriek, which brought out the double 
alto-treble tones of two other feminine astro- 
nomical amateurs, who were present to wit- 
ness the great impending shadow of mother 
earth, altogether making a quartette less of 
melody than of sound, which the pandowdy 
of Auld Lang Syne in its palmiest days could 
never have rivalled. Confusion worse con- 
founded seized all; the telescope was in a trice 
deserted, the moon forgotten, of the two Jun- 
iors who were at the clock, John Davis alone 
remained. Like a soldier on guard he kept 
one eye on the second-hand of the clock and the 
other looking through the enti-y, the kitchen 
and open window upon the telescope, but 
never moved an inch from his post, while 
everybody else ran to the rescue of the laddie 
who was dangling with his tongue protruded, 
and wriggling like a trout out of the water and 
suspended by the gills. Notwithstanding the 
ugly look the case at first presented, the 
tongue was speedily detached from its incar- 
ceration, and the green un sent off into the 
house to get the frost out of his mouth and 
digest his first lesson, which may be of use 
to him in the coming future, that the tongue 
is an unruly member, that " to everything 
there is a season, and a time to every pur- 
pose." " Obsta princi2nis." 

Composure was soon restored, the observer 
took his seat with his eye to the object glass, 
stillness pervaded the premises, undisturbed 
by the flurry the clock was ticking off its 
seconds, and in two minutes the observer ex- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



29 



claimed " time " at the top of his voice. A 
portion of the broad ilUiminated disc of the 
moon had been stricken off by the earth's 
shadow. 1817. 



[We cheerfully publish the following communica- 
tion from one who takes exceptions to some of our 
expressions of opinion. Even if our little evil proph- 
ecy concerning the General Societies should never be 
fulfilled, and we might thus have assurance that real 
life is still in them, it would be almost gratifying.] 

Editors of Orient : — 

Dear Sirs, — The article which appeared in 
your columns last week, relative to the Gen- 
eral Societies, seems of somewhat doubtful 
propriety just at this issue, when efforts are 
faeing made by some really zealous ones to 
revive these organizations. It may have the 
unfortunate, not to say undesirable effect 
of rendering these efforts useless, and, as is 
strongly hinted, another Commencement maj/ 
declare them dead. That they have been in 
a lethargic state for sometime, we admit ; that 
this is the precursor of death, however, we 
deny. It is only a hibernation, and the season 
is now dawning which shall see them awaken- 
ing in all their former vigor and activit3^ 
Those who from the first have strongly advised 
reform in this direction, are now in position to 
instigate and effect it ; but it is, to say the 
least, discouraging when cooperation fails at 
the source from which it is most expected. 
And now for the benefit of any anxious minds, 
it may be said that the ghost of that far-away 
debate has been laid. He will venture forth 
no more from the abode of shades to inspire 
any timid mortals. In his stead Reality is at 
work. Tlie omens have been consulted and 
they are favorable. Class distinctions are 
things of the past, and when we meet in gen- 
eral debates as a college, it will be on com- 
mon ground. Diffident Freshmen need fear 
no more the unapproachable dignity of Seniors, 
or the scathing sarcasms of the Sophomores. 
Then, too, the prevailing sentiment seems to 
be in favor of general debates ; but more than 
all, the obligations which the St. Croix prize 
imposes upon the respective societies are such 
as require prompt and decisive action. The 
Athensean, at the present writing, has already 
commenced the good work by appointing a 
meeting. Now we say that it is an unwar- 
rantable conclusion for any one to affirm that 
the theory of reform will never be practically 



tested, and we leave for events to further 
prove the truth of our assertions. Vestigia 
nulla retrorsum. *^* 



MEMORY. 

Of all things wonderful connected with 
the human form divine, none can exceed that 
wliich we call Memory. Where does this 
mysterious treasure-casket lie ? How peculiar 
must be its construction, for we can never fill 
it. It seems to be the antithesis of the wid- 
ow's cruse. Then, too, there are as many 
kinds of Memory as there are persons. Some 
kind resemble huge waste-baskets, in which 
the odds and ends of a life's reading, thinking 
and observation, are jumbled together in a 
heterogeneous pile. Of the owners of such 
it is generally said that their " forethought 
comes afterwai'ds " ; for though often in pos- 
session of a pointed illustration, or a witty 
repartee, they must search their waste-baskets 
through to find it. 

Others resemble a well-arranged secretary 
containing a multiplicity of drawers, and la- 
beled Histor}-, Fiction, Poetrj', Anecdotes, 
Dates (the mathematical variety). Politics, 
Sentiment, &c. 

The more formal possessors of the last- 
named arrangement are often called " Walk- 
ing Encyclopaedias," which envious people 
consider a term of reproach. 

But, in general, if we would recall a fact 
or incident, we have but to touch a secret 
spring, Avhose location is unknown even to 
ourselves, and right before us opens the mys- 
tic drawer replete with records of the past. 
Yet the bitter always mingles with the sweet, 
and though many pleasing recollections may 
be stored therein, they will seldom be unal- 
lo3'ed. So if we were afflicted with the boon 
of Tithonus we should fear that even this vast 
receptacle of Memory would become gorged, 
or at least defiled, and should crave the priv- 
ilege, at least once in a century, of purifying 
it with the waters of Lethe. 



30 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DUR- 
ING THE COLLEGIATE YEAR AT 

BOWDOIN COLLEG-E, 
By the Class oe 1874. 

EDITORS. 

S. V. Cole, L. H. Kimball, 

W. T. Goodale, D. 0. S. Lowell, 

F. W. Hawthorne, F. K. Wheeler, 

H. K. White. 

Terms — $2 00 a year in advance; single copies, 
15 cents. 

Address communications to Bowdoin Orient, 
Brunswicl£, Maine. 

For sale at 7 Appleton Hall, Bowdoiu College. 
Also by J. Griffin and B. G. Dennison, Brunswick ; 
and A. Williams & Co., 133 Washington St., Boston. 



CONTENTS. 
Vol. III., No. 3.— May 28, 1873. 

Sackcloth and Ashes 25 

Eeminiscences 26 

Communication 29 

Memory 29 

Editorial 30 

Local 31 

Exchanges 33 

The Coming Kegatta 34 



We all approve moderation. We depre- 
cate extremes. But we can never offset the 
evil of one extreme by coupling Avith it the 
other. There are two extremes in Bowdoin 
College ; the mean which would be infinitely- 
preferable to both or either is carefully avoided. 
We refer to the Classical Course and the Sci- 
entific Course. 

Is the Classical Course an extreme ? We 
will show why we think it is. We thoroughly 
believe in the study of Latin and Greek. We 



appreciate the ennobling influences of those 
grand old classic authors. We know what a 
rigorous mental exercise a faithful, honest ap- 
plication to a tough sentence in Latin or Greek 
furnishes. But these are not the only studies 
which afford such opportunities. Every one 
knows how little the student is enabled to 
reap from the great harvest field of learning 
in the short four years of the College course. 
Every one knows how important studies are 
crowded in and crowded out, how important 
chapters are skipped and important lectures 
omitted, merely from want of time. 

There are twenty studies in a category 
where classical literature is only one, of which 
some knowledge is absolutely essential to the 
educated man. Look back over your College 
course, and you will see them strewn along 
by the way, crazy, half-built structures, while 
in every term up to the close of the Junior 
year, you have reared a massive tower of 
classic lore. 

What we deprecate and denounce is the 
studied exclusion and crowding out of impor- 
tant English branches to make way for the 
grim old philosoi^hers of Rome and Athens. 
Look at the College curriculum as it is now 
arranged. Notice first that the few weeks in 
Newman's Rhetoric in the Freshman year -and 
the weekly lectures in Chemistry in the Sopho- 
more year, are taken not from the time devoted 
to Latin and Greek, but from that belonging 
to Mathematics. And again in the winter 
term, Whately's Rhetoric, a treatise whose solid 
worth demands a whole term, divides that 
time with French, already crowded into a sin- 
gle 3'ear, while Latin and Greek hold triumph- 
ant sway through the whole term. Englisli 
Literature, in the Junior year, is Imirried 
through in four weeks, that the sated student 
may fly to new feasts of Latin. 

Again, after deserting our own great mas- 
ters, we can learn the principles of oratory 
from Quintilian only, and find time afterwards 
for just a hasty glance at Political Economy. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



31 



It is no wonder that teachers find it hard work 
to organize classes in optional Latin and Greek. 
The wearied student flees from them as he 
would from a serpent. 

Is the Scientific Course an extreme ? 
We- think so, most certainly. All the great 
omissions we have pointed out in the Class- 
ical Course are also found in the Scientific 
Course. But the gi-eat bore of the Sci- 
entific Course is not Latin and Greek, but 
Science. Science most intricate, infinite, in- 
terminable. There is science in the laboratory, 
science in the field, science in the air, science 
all around. 

The " Classical " shudders as he looks over 
the curriculum. Differential and Integral 
Calculus, Nautical Astronomy, Topogi-aphy, 
Isometrical Projections, Linear Perspective, 
Chemical Physics, Qualitative and Quantita- 
tive Analysis, Agricultural Chemistry, Chemi- 
cal Philosophy, Metallurgy, Vegetable Physiol- 
ogy, are names that bristle forth from that 
frightful list. 

But, it will be said, this is the very thing 
for which the Scientific Course was organized, 
to give special instruction in Science. If so, 
it was organized without regard to the very 
purpose and end of a College Course. It is 
not established to give special instruction in 
any department. It is not established to make 
artists or engineers or chemists, any more than 
it is established to make lawj^ers or doctors or 
ministers. The student in college is, or should 
be, merely laying a broad, deep foundation, 
on which hereafter his peculiar tastes and 
talents shall rear a special structure. But it 
is only the foundation to which his efforts 
should be directed. The College Course 
must not be framed with reference to any par- 
ticular profession or calling ; it must not lead 
to anything save the acquirement of general 
and useful knowledge. 

The best maxim we ever heard given as a 
guide to thorough scholarship was this, " know 
something of everything and everything of 



something ; " not because of the pretty play 
on words, but because it contains the very 
kernel of the whole matter. Lay a broad 
basis of solid acquirements at college, and 
then thoroughly master a single department 
at the professional school. 



Influenced, no doubt, by the College at- 
mosphere, the people " down town " frequently 
discuss the technicalities of Science. We 
were not a little gratified, a day or two since, 
to observe the eloquence with which one of 
the village savants demonstrated to a knot of 
eager listeners the incontrovertible fact, un- 
known to many, that an " 'ister's a fish." 
When this zoological truth had been ex- 
pounded, a specimen of botanical inquisitive- 
ness ventured the inquir3s " Is the peanut a 
fruit ? " Neil Burgess would have envied the 
withering frown which the interrogatee cast 
upon his victim as he replied, "Peanut a 
fruit ! ? No, sir ! the peanut's a nut ! ! ! 



If the stLident who, in hurrying from the 
Reading Room Avith the newly-arrived maga- 
zines under his arm, dropped the June Atlan- 
tic, will call at the OraEXT office it shall be 
returned to him free of charge. 



The Editors of the Orient are gratified 
to announce that they are on the track of that 
voracious hyena which devours our magazine 
literature, and predict that his stuffed skin 
shall soon grace the walls of the Reading 
Room. C \/ cl , 

LOCAL. 



Have you been Maying ? 

That was a " fine boy." 

Where are the peanut venders ? 

The Class canes for '76 are being made in 
New York. 



32 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



We miss the rubicund face of " Ever 
Blest," these warm Sunday afternoons. 

Youthful but aspiring Botanists seem to 
be on the increase. " The woods are full of 
them." 

Botany has created a " corner " in the 
enamel-cloth market. Nothing serious is ap- 
prehended. 

Prof, to Scientific Freshman — "In what 
kind of weather do we usually have thunder ? " 
Fresh. — " In stormy weather, sir." 

Why has Prof. Noel-Hope the best chances 
for winning the human race ? " Because he 
always has the Pole." This jester has since 
" taken the veil." 

The Bath " fair ones " have given two 
large parties within a few weeks past. Sev- 
eral of the students drove down, and enjoyed 
them immensely, of course. 

This from a Senior : AVhy does the owner 
of that "two-dollar dog" board him out? 
Because he's " Bruin trouble." The author's 
" leave of absence " was readily granted. 

The Freshmen are anxiously counting the 
weeks prior to their " coming out " with Class 
canes and tall hats. Be patient. Freshmen ! 
But five weeks longer and your happiness will 
be complete. 

And now foot-ball is the cry. We under- 
stand Appleton Hall has challenged the rest 
of the College to play against them. We are 
patiently waiting to see the game. Surely such 
a generous offer will not be refused. 

The two tables of the eating club 

played a match game of ball, a short time 
since, on the condition that the defeated nine 
treat the crowd. The game was very amus- 
ing, owing to the strange mixture of excellent 
players and those who had never handled a 
ball. It is needless to say the victorious nine 
enjoyed their beans. 



That shady seat at the North End of Win- 
throp, has become the property of a stock 
company ; having purchased it of the College 
for a " vile V," the company proposes to charge 
a moderate sum for the privilege of occupy- 
ing it. For further particulars vide the " Iron 
Jaw." 

Miss F.,(to Junior who seldom makes calls) 
— "Why do you call on me, Mr. E. ? Calling 
is contrary to. yoyir custom, I believe." 

Junior (who is very frank) — "I will not 
deceive you : it is because I like you." 

Miss F. thinks that subject is exhausted, 
and speaks of the weather. 

Anna Lytics is very low again this term. 
Two faithful Sophomores who have " watched" 
with her for the past few nights, report her 
rapidly " failing," and that her death may 
occur at any moment. The class, in conse- 
quence, is selecting its best undertakers for a 
Xjroper interment of the unfortunate Anna. 

We were at a Sunday-School Concert the 
other evening, and enjoyed the following : — 

Little fellow (reciting his verse) — "I am 
the Bread of Life." 

Superintendent (questioning him as to his 
knowledge of the Bible) — " Who said ' I am 
the Bread of Life ' ? " 

(In surprise) — " J said it." 

Sickness is becoming dangerously preva- 
lent among us. The rapidity with which it 
has developed is surprising. A large number 
have handed to the Faculty petitions to be 
excused from military drill. We should judge 
it was necessary when one is found unfortu- 
nately afflicted with Dropsy, Rheumatism, 
Heart Disease, &c. Surely something ought 
to be done to check this growing evil. 

The Juniors have decided to have their 
" Ivy Day," and are rapidly completing their 
arrangements for it. At a Class meeting, held 
on Friday, 16th, F. W. Hawthorne was elected 
Orator ; A. L. Perry, Poet ; and S. V. Cole, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



33 



Odist. The public exercises will be held in 
the chapel. The day is not fully decided 
upon, but wiU probably be June 4th. The 
" Hop " in the evening will be one of the 
attractions, and will be a fine opportunity for 
'73 to end up their college studies with a good 
danee. 

At a meeting of the Athenfean Society, 
May 15th, the following officers were chosen 
for the ensuing year : L. H. Kimball, Presi- 
dent ; E. N. Merrill, Vice President; J. P. 
Bickford, Orator ; H. G. White, Poet ; J. J. 
Bradley, Secretary; W. H. Holmes, Treasurer; 
A. G. Bradstreet, 1st Librarian ; S. M. Car- 
ter, 2d Librarian ; R. Hemmenway, 3d Libra- 
rian; A. L. Perry, M. W. Davis, S. L. Larra- 
bee, Editors ; C. J. Palmer, D. W. Bradley, 
W. A. Robinson, Standing Committee ; S. V. 
Cole, H. Johnson, Auditors. 

Prof. Noel-Hope, an English gentleman, 
recently an instructor in modern languages in 
Ottawa, C. W., gave a free dramatic reading 
in the Senior recitation room, on the after- 
noon of May 19th. The room was, of course, 
filled. The reader gave a fine rendering 
of " The Yarn of the Nancy Bell " ; and, 
generally, all his selections were followed by 
hearty .applause. The Professor is a scliolarly 
man, of easy address, and in conversation is 
very entertaining. At his reading, advertised 
for some day later m the week, there should 
be a full house. 



A student of the 



eating club, who 



had acquired quite a reputation as an " eater," 
and who was particularly fond of pies and 
cakes, was surprised one evening to find a 
cake of considerable size resting invitingly 
near his plate. While he was trying to con- 
vince the rest that it was for his own particu- 
lar benefit (they were veiy stubborn and 
would not be easily convinced), the smiling 
countenance of one of " God's images cut in 
ebony " appeared at the door and sweetly 
said, " The cake was made for j'ou, Charlie." 



Charhe was permitted to enjoy his cake in 
peace. The others had noticed she was accus- 
tomed to smile kindly upon him, but did not 
imagine things had gone so far. They all 
have been trying to earn a similar reward in 
the same way, but in vain. She is true to 
C'haiiie. 



EXCHANGES. 

The April number of Hamilton Literary 
MontMy is largely devoted to " the persuasive 
art." It has an interesting article of thirteen 
pages, entitled "Ancient and Modern Ora- 
tory," which gives a good picture of the 
science from the earliest times — thinks mod- 
ern oratory is not degenerate but only 
changed, as civilization has changed, in order 
to accomplish the same end, " to persuade." 
This is followed by a shorter article on a 
similar topic, called " Marcus Tullius Again." 
The Editor's Table is well sustained. " That 
Cat" is certainly amusing. 

The Anvil has a word on " Higli-Seasoned 
Preaching." The anecdotes with which it 
illustrates are extreme cases, and of course 
prove no more in preaching than extreme 
cases in other things ; yet no one doubts 
there is a tendency in preachers of the gospel 
to bring in a little novelty now and then, to 
delight their hearers, and even we find such 
a man as Spurgeon, in his congregation of 
butchers, praying for " blessings on the sham- 
bles," and saying other things that look like 
seasoning. 

We will never be so bold as to deprive 
slang its place in the eternal order of things, 
and evidently the College Argus thinks much 
in the same way. Some of its articles in the 
last issue contain rather too much of the 
undignified element. " Yarns," especially, is 
a proof that wit founded on slang can never 
be of the highest order. The article, how- 
ever, on " 111 Manners at Chapel," is to the 
point, and Bowdoin students might read it 
with profit. 



34 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



The Harvard Advocate contains a little 
poem in which there is such a menagerie of 
metaphors as we do not remember to have 
seen for some time, in so short a space. 
Thus: 

" Prom the lyres of the ancicut poets 
I steal the dim petals and buds, — 
From the altars of ;;ods and heroes, 
From the crest of Time's fjolden floods." 

If flowers grow in such places as these, of 

course we do not wonder, when we read 

farther on, that 

" The flowers of my heart awaken 
Melodious minstrelsy." 

This verse reads very well till we get to the 

fourth line, 

"By the feet of the Masters old, 

I sat, aud listened to hear 
The thoughts of their hearts unfold, 

Their temple of life to rear." 

In the next verse we have, 

" The light that flashed over their souls, 
When the terror of night had flowu, 

Over the breakers of darkness rolls. 
And wide o'er my heart is sown." 

In the next 

" It is sprung into life and poTver, 
And the laden boughs now bend." 

" Beautiful eyes aweep," and " bowers I never 
disjMi'l," are excellent for metre. If the 
author of this poem should ever smell a rat 
no doubt he would nip him in the hud. 

The Nadhsonensis speaking of college pa- 
jDers and the practical use they may have, says : 
" As an advertisement the college paper is in 
itself valuable. Its circulation is not great, 
but it does what other advertisements never 
can. The mere announcement in the news- 
papers that a school is so and so, and a 
presentation of its claims and advantages 
amounts to but little. In these days of hum- 
bug an advertisement means nothing but 
humbug to most people. But a college paper 
regularly sent to the preparatory schools of 
the country carries with it the spirit of the 
institution. It is a living witness to all its 
readers of what life and energy there are at 
its home. Its contents, not written for an 
advertisement, are received as truth, and the 



real character of the school is read from its 
paper." 

The Marietta Olio speaks of the Bates 
Student as published by the class of '74, 
Bowdoin College. It would seem almost 
superfluous to add that the Bates Student is 
published by the students oi Bales College, — 
and a good publication it is. 

The Olio has a veiy good translation of 
Bion's "Elegy on the death of Adonis," but 
the translator's preface seems to indicate that 
he is not acquainted with Mrs. Browning's 
elegant version. 



THE COMING REGATTA. 

On Saturday afternoon, May 10, the regat- 
ta committee for 1873 met at the Massasoit 
House, Springfield, for the transaction of busi- 
ness. The following colleges were repre- 
sented: Amherst, E. M. Hartwell; Brown, 
A. D. McClellan ; Columbia, S. M. Spier, Jr. ; 
Cornell, J. B. Edgerly; Dartmouth, F. A. 
Thayer ; Harvard, R. H. Dana ; Massachusetts 
Agricultural, E. P. Alexander ; Trinity, S. B. 
Underbill; Wesleyan, H. H. Costen; Wil- 
liams, John Gunster; Yale, H. A. Oakes. 
Mr. F. S. Waterhouse, the delegate from Bow- 
doin, was absent. We condense the following 
account of the meeting from the Springjidd 
Baity Repuhlioan : — 

■Meeting called to order by Mr. Hartwell, 
temporary Secretary. R. H. Dana of Har- 
vard, was chosen permanent Chairman, and 
E. M. Hartwell of Amherst, Secretary. 

The committee then proceeded to make 
arrangements for the regatta in July. It was 
fijst decided to invite Messrs. Phillips and 
King of the Springfield Club, to their meeting, 
after which the following motions were car- 
ried : That each boat be held from an anchored 
boat at the start ; that the Secretar}' furnish 
five printed copies of the Constitution to each 
club in the Association ; that if for any rea- 
son the race is postponed, it shall take place 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



35 



on the next afternoon; that each club be 
taxed $15 to defray incidental expenses ; that 
a committee of three be appointed by the 
chair to present to the committee, at least 
three days before the race, names of suitable 
persons fi-om whom to choose a referee ; that 
when the committee adjourned it should be 
until Monday, July 14, at the same place and 
time ; that a committee of three be appointed 
by the chair to attend to the furnishing of 
chamjiion flags, the cost to be defrayed by the 
competing crews. After some discussion it 
was decided to make arrangements for a colle- 
giate single-scull race, provided no less than 
three boats put in an appearance. This race 
will be the first of the afternoon, and the 
names of the competitors must be sent to the 
chairman of regatta committee before June 20. 

Mr. King, being called upon to speak for 
the Springfield Club, made some very encour- 
aging remarks. He said if the club knew just 
what the students wanted they would en- 
deavor to satisfy them. He was confident 
that the club would raise at least $1000 by 
contributions from various sources, with which 
to procure prize cups, boat houses and wharves. 
They have also made arrangements for a grand 
regatta ball, for which they expect to secure the 
services of the Saratoga band. The commit- 
tee extended a vote of thanks to the Spring- 
field Club for their kind acts and good inten- 
tions. The committee then resolved them- 
selves into a committee of the whole, and 
were taken down the river to view the course, 
by Capt. Otto of the Clyde. On their return 
they decided that the starting point be moved 
down the river nearly a half-mile, to avoid a 
narrow place in the river. 

Messrs. McClellan of Brown, Oakes of 
Yale, and Hartwell of Amherst, were ap- 
pointed as committee to nominate a referee ; 
Messrs. Underbill of Trinity, Thayer of Dart- 
mouth, and Spier, Jr., of Columbia, as com- 
mittee on flags, after which the committee 
adjourned. 



TIME TABLE. 
Trains leave Brunswick for — 

Augusta — 8.30 a.m.; 2.35 and 7,00p.m.; 1.50 

A.M. (Pull.) 
Bangor— 2.35 p.m. ; 1.50 A.M. (Pull.) 
Bath — 7.40 and 8.30 a.m.; 2.30, 5.10 and 7.00 

P.M. 
Boston— 7.38 a.m.; 2.05 and 5.00 p.m.; 12 M. 

(Pull.) 
Farmington — 2.30 p.m. 
Lewiston — 7.40 a.m. ; 2.30 and 7.00 p.m. 
Portland — 7.33 a.m. ; 2.05 and 5.00 p.m. ; 12 M. 

(Pull.) 
Waterville — 2.35 p.m. ; 1.50 a.m. (Pull.) 



BUSINESS CARDS. 

S TROUT & HOLJLES, 
CoC.NSELORS AT LAW, 

No. 83 Middle Street (Canal Bank Building), PORTLAND, >rE. 

A. A. .STKOLT. GEO. F. HOLMES ('66). 

JOSEPn A. LOCKE (Bowdoin, '65), Attorney and Counsellor at Law, 
74 Middle Street, cor. Exchange Street, PORTLAND. 



JOSIAH IL DRIIMMOND (Colby, '46) Counsellor at Law, 100 Exchange 
street, PORTLAND. 

NOYES, HOLIVIES & COWIPANY, 

219 IVasMngtoH St. and 10 Bromfield St., 
BOSTON, MASS. 

PUBLISHEKS AND BOOKSELLEES, 



STATIONERS, 



All kinds of COLLEGE AND SCHOOL TEXT BOOKS, and STANDARD 
AND MISCELLANEOUS LITERATURE, supplied at 

LOW PRICES. 

Orders by Mnil or Express will receive prompt autl cfireful attention. 
These books may be obtained through J. P. BICKFORD, Agent, No. 21 
Maine Hull. 

DIVINITY SCHOOL OF HAETAED UNIVERSITY 

This School is open to persons of all denominations. Pecuniary aid ia 
afforded to those who are needy and deserving. 
The next academic year will begin 

SEPTEMBER 26th. 

Further information will be given on application to 

Prof. OLIVER STEARNS, D.D., 
Or Prof. E. J. YOUNG, 

Cambridge, Mass. 



36 



BOWBOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Classical Department. 

TEEMS OF ADMISSION. 

Candidates for admission into the Freshman Class are examined as fol- 
lows : — 

Harkness's Latin Grammar, including Prosody; Parts I. and 11. Hark- 
ness's Introduction to Latin Prose Composition; Tirgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the ^neid; Cicero's Select Orations; Sallust. 

Hadley's or Goodwin's Greek Grammar; Goodwin's Greek Reader; or 
Xenophon's Anabasis, 4 books, and Homer's Iliad, 2 books. 

Arithmetic; Algebra, to equations of the second degree; Davies's 
Legendre's Geometry, first and third books. 

English Grammar; Ancient and Modern Geography. 

Scientific Department. 

TERMS OF ADMISSION. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the following subjects : — 
Mathematics — Arithmetic, including Common and Decimal Frac- 
tions. Interest, and Square Root; Algebra, to Equations of the 
Second Degree; Geometry, Books I. and m. of Davies's Le- 
gendre. 
Geography — PoUtical Geography, and simple elements of Astrono- 
mical and Physical Geography. 
History — Ijeading facts in general History, and especially in Ameri- 
can History. 
Latin — Allen's Latin Grammar, or the equivalent. 
English — The examination will consist in 1st, Reading aloud a pas- 
sage from some standard author, with explanations of gram- 
matical construction, and definition and derivation of words; 2d, 
Writing a few sentences in English, on some familiar subject, 
reference being had to spelling and punctuation as well as to' 
composition; 3d Correction, of ungrammatical sentences com- 
posed for the purpose. 
All candidates for admission must produce certificates of their good 
moral character. 

The time for admission is the Friday after Conamencement, and the 
first Thursday of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants may be 
examined at other times. 

Courses of Study. 

The regular course of Instruction is that commended by the leading 
colleges of the country as eminently adapted^to secure liberal culture. 

TUB SCIENTIFIC COURSE 

has been recently organized. Thirty-four students have already entered, — 
a fact which indicates that the College has been successful in its efi'ort to 
meet the demand for a liberal course of study which shall at the same 
time look towards the actual uses and applications of knowledge. 

The studies pursued in this course are comprised in the following: — 
Languages — English one year, and optional two ; Latin one year, 
optional three ; French one year, optional three ; German one 
.- year, optional two ; Spanish, Italian, Swedish, Anglo-Saxon, one 

year. 
Mathematics — Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, Mensuration, 
Spherical Trigonometry, Analytical Geometry ; Differential and 
Integral Calculus, with the application of these to Surveying, 
Navigation, Projections, DialUng, Levelling, Astronomy, Mechan- 
ics, Topogi-aphical and Hydrographical Engineering. 



Natural Philosophy — Mechanics, Hydrodynamics, Pneumatics, 
Optics, Astronomy, Light, Heat, Electricity, &c. 

Chemistry — In all its branches and applications. 

History and Political Science — General, Medieval and Modern His- 
tory, Political Economy, General Principles of Law, Interna 
tional Law, Law of Evidence, Constitution of United States, 
Theory of Government, American Law. 

Philosophy — Rhetoric, Logic, Psychology, Metaphysics, Evidences 
of Natural and Revealed Religion, Ethics, Esthetics. 

The studies of the first two years are common throughout the Depart- 
ment and are intended to lay a broad and substantial foundation for all 
branches of subsequent study. In the last two years the studies are 
arranged in distinct courses, in accordance with certain leading objects : a 
general scientific culture, or special technical skill. Attention Is particu- 
larly invited to the facilities offered for the thorough study of Civil En^- 
neering. 



A POST-GRADUATE COURSE 

of two years is also commenced, in which Instruction will be given in 
the following schools : — 

I. Letters — Comprising Languages, Ancient and Modern (includ- 
ing the Oriental) with then- literatures; Philology; Rhetoric; 
Logic ; History ; Elocution ; the Fine Arts. This leads to the 
degree of Master of Arts. 

n. Science — Advanced Mathematics, Physics, Natural History and 
Chemistry, in their uses and appUcations. This leads to the 
degree of Doctor of Science. 

m. Philosophy — Comprising the above, considered in their reasons 
and relations ; Psychology, Metaphysics, Ethics, Esthetics ; Poli- 
tics ; Theory of Government, Constitutional History, Priociples 
of Law, International Law. Leading to the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy. 

IV. Medicine — The Medical School of Maine. Degree, — M. D. 

Students who are not graduates will be received on satisfactory evi- 
dence of proficiency in study which will enable them to profit by this 
Course. 

Much and careful attention is given to Physical Culture under the train- 
ing of accompUshed Instructors. The Gymnasium is well provided with 
approved apparatus, and the opportunities for Military drill and discipline 
are of the very best. 

It is but just to say that good morals and manliness are distinguishing 
features of college life at Bowdoin. 

The Library of Bowdoin is one of rare value, and the choicest works 
are constantly added. The Gallery of Paintings is well known to be one of 
the most remarkable in the country. .The Cabinet and apparatus are 
ample for their pxxrpose. 

The annual expenses are, for tuition, &c., $90. Board $2.50 and $4.00 
a week. Pecuniary assistance, from the income of thirty scholarships and 
various other benefactions, is rendered to those who are unable fully to 
meet their expenses otherwise. 

Commencement July 10th. Examination for admission July 12th and 
Aug. 28th, at 9 a.m. 

First term begins Aug. 28th, at evening. 

Every encouragement will be given to persons who desire to pursue 
any study taught in the College. 

The town of Brunswick, situated on tide water — the Androscoggin River 
on one side and the Ocean on the other ; already a seat of various manu- 
factures and destined to become one of the principal railroad centres of the 
State, easy also of access from all quarters, — ^presents an excellent locahty 
for scientific as well as literary pursuits, while the faciUties afforded by 
Bowdoin College, its Libraries, Galleries of Art, Cabinets, Scientific Col- 
lections, Laboratories, and Apparatus, offer great inducements to the ear 
nest student of the Useful and Liberal Ai'ts 



Vol. III. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JUNE 11, 1873. 



No. 4. 



FEMALE EDUCATION. 

In the heat of modern mania for reform, 
all existing institutions are denounced as 
abuses ; everything that is new is lauded as 
an improvement. Under the banner of re- 
form the wildest schemes are advocated, and 
most salutary and well-tried usages are as- 
sailed. 

Woman is the topic of the most animated 
and vigorous agitation of the present day. 
The woman question is the all-comprehensive 
name of a discussion that involves all the in- 
terests and relations of the female sex in 
every phase of society. The most important 
of the questions growing out of this is, " How 
shall woman be educated?" A blind but 
popular interpretation of this is, " How shall 
woman obtain a College education ? " But a 
careful analyzer would first ask " What kind 
of an education does woman need?" Is it 
that afforded by our established colleges ? 

The object of an education is, we premise, 
to fit one for active life. The plan of that 
education manifestly depends upon the kind 
of life one is to lead, the occupation one 
chooses. Hence we have our Medical, Law, 
Theological, and Agricultural Schools, train- 
ing men for these several professions. But 
what callings can be more widely separated 
than those of the man of the world and the 
wife of the home circle? 

And manifestly the college course was 
established for those who are to fight in the 
thick of life's battle, and bear life's heavier 
burdens, not for those whose duty and destiny 
is more retired and yet more sacred. The 
purpose for which it was devised, the plan 
upon which it is instituted, the manner in 
which that plan is developed, have no ref- 



erence to the delicate offices of womanhood. 
Its laws and regulations, its forms and cus- 
toms, are for men, and for men onl3% 

B.ut the studies pursued in college are not 
at all calculated to fit woman for the life work 
to which she is destined. Greek, the higher 
Mathematics, some of the natural sciences. 
Logic, Philosoph}^ and Political Science, are 
studies for which woman has no taste, no 
talent, no use. 

An^ there are, too, many things altogether 
and justly omitted in the college course, which 
are absolutely essential to tlie cultivated 
woman who expects to fill her place in the 
social 1 economy. Music, art and literature, 
certainly are branches with which our Artium 
Baccalaureata should be conversant. 

But, surpassing every other consideration, 
is one that affects the very foundation of our 
social relations. 

If the womanly nature is to be maintained, 
if womanly charms and womaulj^ purity are to 
be left intact, if womanhood is to continue the 
antitliesis, the complement of manhood, the 
question of co-sexual education is at once set- 
tled. If, of every change, it could be said 
thus far and no farther shalt thou go, it would 
be well. But one step ever precedes and pre- 
destines another. If this pretended reform is 
accomplished it will be the initiative (if the 
initiative has not already been taken) of a 
complete revolution in our social system. 
Woman's nature is not altogether an inherent 
attribute but the result of ages of training 
and development. Reverse the whole course 
and tendency of this training and you meta- 
morphose woman. Re-inaugurate Spartan 
discipline, and in not many generations Ama- 
zons and Dianas will fill the places of the 



38 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



modest maidens of to-day. In every respect 
then, the college is absolutely unfitted to be 
the nursery of wives and mothers. As well 
may you expect to fashion a delicate image 
in a cannon-shot mould, or nurture a slender 
vine in the rough north wind, as to form a 
true womanly character in one of our male 
colleges. 

It is well enough for those who would im- 
pose upon woman the duties and responsibil- 
ities of manhood, to demand for her man- 
hood's education, but as long as there are 
those who hope still to preserve the female 
character in its grace and purity, this demand 
will be resisted. 

Should woman, then, be deprived of the 
benefits of an advanced education ? Certainly 
not. But the system upon which she is edu- 
cated should have just as much reference to 
the calling she is to pursue, as in the case of 
the lawyer or doctor. Men and women both, 
are not merely to be crammed with informa- 
tion, but be fitted for life's work. And if the 
sacred duties of wife and mother need no 
special training, certainly no occupation in the 
world needs it. Most heartily we believe in 
the establishment of Female Colleges, not to 
be merely copies of male institutions with 
female students, but to be thoroughly unique 
and distinct in their constitution and govern- 
ment. We will not presume to say what 
studies should be pursued in this College, or 
by what laws it should be governed. But 
that such an institution should be, can be, and 
if the best good of woman and society is 
sought, will be established, is most certain. 



THE INFLUENCE OF BOWDOIN IN 
THE WEST. 

To the Editors of the Orient. 

The efforts which the friends of the Col- 
lege are making to put it on a sounder finan- 
cial basis, is certainly a move in the right 
direction. But how to secure more students, 



seems to me to be quite as important a ques- 
tion. Must Bowdoin be dependent upon the 
State of Maine, and graduate classes of thirty 
and thirty-five, as seems to be the case at pres- 
ent, or shall she draw large classes from all parts 
of the country as other New England colleges 
are doing ? Of course very much depends on 
the character of the Faculty. One man hav- 
ing a national reputation, like Parker Cleave- 
land, would draw more students than fifty 
professors of ordinary scholarship. But our 
teachers cannot all be Cleavelands any more 
than our graduates can all be Longfellows and 
Hawtliornes. We must therefore supplement 
the character of the Faculty with the influence 
of the Alumni, in urging students to take 
their collegiate course at Bowdoin. In Maine 
and other New England States, such an in- 
fluence is exerted to the great advantage of 
the college. But how is it in the West, the 
source from which scores of students should 
be drawn every year ? 

For the past three years I have had occa- 
sion to travel more or less in nearly all the 
Western States, and to my surprise as well as 
regret, let me say I have rarely met with or 
heard of a Bowdoin graduate outside of Chi- 
cago and two or three other cities. Graduates 
of Dartmouth, Amherst, Williams, and Yale, 
of course, seem to flourish everywhere. There 
is scarcely a city or large town in Ohio, Indi- 
ana and the States of the Northwest, in which 
one or all of these colleges are not represented 
by men formerly residents of the Eastern 
States, but who, after graduation, sought^posi- 
tions and homes in the West. They are 
engaged in teaching, law, trade, and other 
worthy pursuits, and are not only men of in- 
fluence in their communities, but take a lively 
interest in educational matters. In Dayton, 
O., for example, the President and Secretary 
of the Board of Education, and the Princi- 
pal and Assistant Principal of the High School, 
are all graduates of Dartmouth. In Colum- 
bus, Cincinnati, Toledo, Indianapolis, and 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



39 



scores of other cities, New England colleges 
are similarly represented. 

Now, what is the result of all this ? That 
nine times out of ten, j^oung men who are 
preparing for a collegiate course are influ- 
enced by their teachers and other educators 
to attend the colleges of which the latter are 
graduates. In my own city, out of a class of 
four who are fitting for college, three will go 
to Dartmouth. Why ? Because their teacher, 
a most excellent man, graduated from Dart- 
mouth. Such illustrations might be indefi- 
nitel}' multiplied. 

Is there any reason why Bowdoin, also, 
may not have her share of Western students ? 
The cost of getting to Brunswick by our 
great trunk railroad lines, is but little, if any, 
more than it is to Dartmouth or Amherst, and 
certainly the facilities for obtaining a thorough 
collegiate training at Bowdoin are second to 
no institution in the country. Then why are 
the Western States not represented in all our 
classes? Simply because Bowdoin's Alumni 
are not as strong in these States as they should 
be. There are not enough out here to 
" talk lip " Bowdoin, to tell of her beautiful 
grounds, her capacious dormitories, her attrac- 
tive chapel, extensive libraries and cabinets, 
valuable paintings, and above all, her energetic 
President and working Faculty. There is 
not an Institution in the entire West, Ann 
Arbor not excepted, which is worthy the name 
of " college " when compared with our be- 
loved Alma Mater; and j'et " Buckeyes " and 
" Hoosiers " cannot " get it through their 
heads " that the far-off corner of our Union 
whose towns and villages are the first to be 
illumined by the rays of the rising sun, can 
possibly possess a college worthy of their 
attention. Tell them here it was that Long- 
fellow and Hawthorne, Fessenden and Cilley, 
Cheever and Hale, and many other men of 
national repute, received their college training, 
and you may possibly gain sufficient attention 
to justify the showing of a catalogue, and the 



pleasurable work of expatiating on the merits 
of the college. But so few men are met with 
in the West who are graduates of Bowdoin, 
that it is almost impossible to get fathers or 
their sons to seriouslj^ look into the advan- 
tages offered by the leading college of Maine. 
The fact is, Bowdoin is comparatively un- 
known in the West, and consequently witJiout 
influence, and not until the Alumni spread her 
fame abroad can she ever hope to receive her 
share of Western patronage. Worthy gradu- 
ates, therefore, sliould be assisted to desirable 
positions in the West, and Jioiv best to do this, 
ought certainly to be a matter of as much 
importance to the officers and friends of Bow- 
doin as to those of other colleges. But with- 
out touching upon this question in the present 
article, which is already too long, I will make 
it the subject of a future communication, if 
you will iillow your columns to be filled with 
the puerile discussion of an important topic. 

A. 



CLASS EXCURSION. 

On Tuesday, May 20, Prof. E. S. Morse 
closed a very able and entertaining course of 
Zoological Lectures, before the Junior Class, 
with the welcome intelligence that he had 
obtained an adjourn for them the next day, 
that they might make a search for brachiopods 
and acalephs under his immediate super- 
vision. This announcement caused no little 
stir among the class. Teams were engaged 
down town ; stewards received their charges 
and cooks their injunctions — for it was under- 
stood that whatever " fluids and solids " our 
better judgment said we should stand in need 
of must be carried with us. Wednesday 
morning comes and about 9 a.m., 
■' Qaadrupedaute putrein souitu quatit iiugula campum." 
" All aboard ! " is the cry, and we clamber 
into single, double and multiple conveyances, 
and start for the sea shore. The day is pro- 
pitious and so are the omens, and our com- 



40 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



rades kill the time so effectually witli story 
and song that almost before we suspect it we 
are on the grounds. The euphonious name 
of the place is "Lookout Point," which is 
very suggestive, for it is a first-rate chance to 
look out, but you can't see anything. Several 
students, Professor Morse and others of the 
Faculty, are here before us, and engaged 
according to their several tastes. Everybody 
who has brought a bottle — an empty one — 
is engaged in collecting sea worms, barnacles, 
snails, " rock-eels," shrimps, &c., while others 
are busy in their own way, preserving the 
viscera of the delicious clams which are lying 
around loose. A " clam-bake " is proposed, a 
fire built, and in a few minutes several dozens 
have been torn from their little beds and lie 
awaiting the sacrifice. Meantime a mania 
has arisen for star-fishes, and these dripping 
echinoderms are ruthlessly torn from their 
moorings and flung upon the sea weed. Sud- 
denly the Professor cries that he has found 
the origin of the vertebrates, and we all clus- 
ter around to see what he calls " ascidians," 
but which appear like bits of jelly scattered 
over the rocks, and don't look as though they 
had much backbone anyway. 

But now our bottles and jars are full of 
specimens, and yet we feel a decided empti- 
ness; so we repair to a neighboring grove 
and eat our bread and cheese. [It is rumored 
that some took cabbage.] 

Some thoughtful men brought lemons and 
sugar, with which was speedily concocted the 
" cup that cheers but does not inebriate," and 
forthwith the hearts of the vocalists were 
niade glad and they made the welkin ring 
(you may have heard the expression) with 
many a jovial song. Among these was one 
contributed by a member of the Faculty, who 
sang not " Arma virumque " — but of a certain 
Dutch gentleman of wonderful gastronomic 
powers, who 

Praak like a " shvine," from the " bung " and the " pail," 
His " viskey " and " vine," his " rum " and his " ale " ; 



And when his "viskey" was mingled with "sherry" 
He stontly declared that it made him feel " merry." 

Just at this point our party was increased 
by the arrival of some Seniors, Avho had in- 
tended to accompany us but had mistaken the 
road. When at last they reached the " Point " 
the first trace of our party that they found 
was the clam-bake, and it is but justice to 
them to say that they explored that trace with 
a zeal worthy of the occasion. At length, 
however, the singing revealed our position 
and they speedily joined us. More lemonade 
was drank, more cigars smoked, more jokes 
cracked, and when one of the number, exalted 
by the " exigencies of the occasion," nimbly 
sprang among the branches of a spreading 
oak, the Professor said it was an evident 
reversion to ancestral traits. This, of course, 
brought him down as well as the rest of us, 
and when the descending sun reminded us of 
our homeward journey we arose and departed, 
inwardly reflecting on the moral tendency of 
crustaceans and gasteropods, and firmly resolv- 
ing never to climb trees in the presence of a 
Darwinian. 



CARDINAL MEZZOFANTI. 

One of the most remarkable of mental 
monsters (if we laay be allowed the expres- 
sion) in all history was Cardinal Joseph Mez- 
zofanti, the renowned linguist. He was the 
son of a carpenter of Bologna, and was born 
in 1774. He was destined to inherit his father's 
occupation, but his wonderful talent in acquir- 
ing and memorizing facts, attracted the atten- 
tion of distinguished men, and he was sent to 
school and eventually to college. 

Here he pursued the studj^ of language 
with zealous devotion, and at graduation had 
acquired a knowledge of Latin, Greek, He- 
brew, Arabic, Spanish, French, German and 
Swedish. In 1797 he was admitted to priest's 
orders and soon after was appointed Professor 
of Arabic in the University of Bologna, and 



BOWDOm ORIENT. 



41 



subsequently Professor of Oriental Languages. 
Here he devoted himself enthusiastically to 
his favorite study, and made marvelous ac- 
quirement. In describing his methods of 
study, he said: "I made it a rule to learn 
every strange grammar, and to apply myself 
to every new dictionary that came witliin my 
reach. I was constantly filling my head with 
new words. Whenever a stranger, -ndiether 
of high or low origin, passed through Bologna 
I tried to turn the visit to account, either for 
the purpose of perfecting my pronunciation 
or of learning the familiar words and turns of 
expression." 

In 1815 he was made Librarian at the Uni- 
versity. Every promotion was made a step- 
ping-stone to higher acquirements in language. 
It seemed almost a monomania with this won- 
derful man. His fame spread far and wide. 
He was called "the chameleon of languages." 
Lord Byron, in 1820, called him "a walking 
polyglot, a monster of language, and a Bria- 
reus of parts of speech." He received press- 
ing invitations to change his residence from 
Bologna to Paris, Vienna and Florence, but 
he refused them all. But in 1831 he was in- 
duced to remove to Rome. 

He was rapidl}^ promoted in the offices of 
the church, and in 1838 made Cardinal. Rome 
was always crowded with strangers, and his 
studies were here greatly facilitated. Many 
and diverse are the accounts of his incredible 
acquirements. An eminent German scholar, 
Herr Guido Gorres, in 1841 writes of him : 
" He is familiar with all the European lan- 
guages, and by this I understand not onl}^ the 
ancient classical ones and the modern ones of 
the first class, such as Greek and Latin, or the 
Italian, French, German, Spanish, Portuguese 
and English ; his knowlege extends also to the 
languages of the second class, viz. : the Dutch, 
Danish and Swedish, to the whole Slavonic 
family, Russian, Bohemian or Czechish, to the 
Servian, the Hungarian, the Turkish, and even 
to those of the third class, the Irish, the Welsh, 



the Wallachian, the Albanian, the Bulgarian 
and the Illyrian. Even the Romani of the 
Alps and the Lettish are not unknown to him ; 
nay, he has made himself acquainted with 
Leppish. He is master of all the languages 
which fall within the Indo-Germanic famil}"-, 
the Sanscrit and Persian, the Koordish, the 
Georgian, the Armenian. He is familiar with 
all the members of the Semitic famil}', the 
Hebrew, the Arabic, the Syriac, the Samari- 
tan, the Chaldee, the Sabaic, nay even Chi- 
nese, which he not only reads but speaks. 
Among the Hamitic languages he knows Cop- 
tic, Ethiopic, Ab3-ssinian, Amharic and Ango- 
lese." 

Besides those mentioned in this categorj'' 
other writers ascribe to him a knowledge of 
Flemish, Cornish, Peruvian, Tamulic, Maltese 
and Peguan, and, to crown the whole, of the 
language of the Chippewa, Delaware and 
Algonquin Indians. He was not only ac- 
quainted with the pure and elegant type of 
these languages, but with the almost infinite 
branches and dialects of each, whether Paris- 
ian or Provencal, Saxon or Tyrolese. 

There is little doubt that this extraordinary 
man had more or less acquaintance with over 
one hundred different languages, and that he 
spoke with ease and fluency between thirty 
and forty. 

He was thoroughlv conversant too, with 
the literature and history of almost every 
nation on the globe. But he was merely a 
treasury of information, a living Encyclopedia. 
There was no originality in his genius. His 
talents as a •na-iter and orator were limited. 
His immense acquirements were buried with 
him and did the world little good. He died 
May 15th, 1849, and was buried beside the 
grave of Torquato Tasso. 



C. J. Palmer has been appointed Senior 
Librarian for the coming year. The Junior 
Librarians are C. L. Clarke, G. C. Cressey, 
E. H. Hall, W. H. Holmes, W. Pulsifer. 



42 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PUBLISHED EVEET ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DUE- 
nSTG THE COLLEGIATE TEAK AT 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE, 
, By the Class oe 1874. 

EDITORS. 

S. V. Cole, L. H. Kimball, 

W. T. GooDALE, D. 0. S. Lowell, 

F. W. Hawthoene, F. K. Wheeler, 

H. K. White. 

Terms — $2 00 a year in advance; single copies, 
15 cents. 

Address communications to Bowdoih Orient, 
Brunswiclj, Maine. 

For sale at 7 Appletou Hall, Bowdoiu College. 
Also by J. Griffin and B. G. Dennison, Brunswick; 
and A. Williams & Co., 135 Washington St., Boston. 



CONTENTS. 
1,V0L. III., No. 4. — June 11, 1873. 

Female Education 37 

Influence of Bowdoin in the West 38 

Class Excursion 39 

Cardinal Mezzofanti 40 

Editorial 42 

Communication 44 

Local - - 45 

College News 46 



It is rather a pretty custom witlial that 
we have at Bowdoiu ou the evening wheu 
the Senior class attend college prayers for the 
last time. 

Prayers are held about sunset ; and as the 
bell peals forth its call in the same old-fash- 
ioned way, some must be thinking of old 
times — the many such services they have 
attended, in cold weather, in warm weather, 
sometimes coming early and orderly with the 
decorum of their Freshmen days, sometimes 
lingering so long that onty a desperate rush 



will admit them, — and now this one particu- 
lar service is to be the consummation of the 
whole series ! But there is no haste to-night ; 
everybody has plenty of time. More mem- 
bers of the Faculty are present than usual. 
Ladies are in the gallery. No monitor is 
needed to see that every man of the three 
lower classes is in his place. The Seniors 
somewhat gravely come in and take their 
accustomed seats. The old chapel looks more 
beautiful than ever — Bowdoin is proud of 
her chapel — and the open doors receive the 
full glory of the sunset. 

Suddenly the bell stops. Everything is so 
still that we can hear the bell-ringer's key 
rattle in the lock of the tower. The large 
doors are closed, and there is a moment's wait- 
ing. Then, from the gallery, a quartette, 
generally composed of members of the Junior 
class, sing a parting ode, to which all listen 
with lingering interest. After the singing, a 
member of the Faculty reads an appropriate 
portion from the Bible and offers prayer. 

Again the doors are opened and out-of- 
door life and light once more become visible. 
The Seniors now step into the aisle and form 
in fours, arm in arm. When all are ready 
they begin to sing that good old song, " Auld 
Lang Syne " — how dear these lines of Robbie 
Burns become on such an occasion — and to 
this air they begin to march slowly out of the 
chapel. Arm in arm — old jealousies are 
ended, old friendships are more friendly. The 
bitter things, if any there have been, begin to 
grow pleasant or are forgotten. Already the 
things of college days are the things of mem- 
ory, and memory softens the hard things 
always. 

But they have reached the entrance, 
and, taking places on either side, they wait 
for the three lower classes to pass on ahead. 
The latter form in two lines from the chapel 
doors, and through these lines the Seniors now 
continue their march and song. Reaching the 
extremity of the lines they pause, and the 



BOWDOIN OBIENT. 



43 



President of the Junior class proposes three 
cheers for them, and the cheers are given with 
a will. After this the Seniors reply by cheer- 
ing Alma Mater, Faculty, etc., and the scene 
is over. 

Not a remarkable scene indeed, for display 
and formality, but for simplicity. The oc- 
casion gives it all its interest. When we 
know that old associations are to be broken 
up forever, we always stop a moment to re- 
flect. Whether that reflection takes the form 
of ceremony or not it is alwa3^s impressive. 

Such a scene as this has taken place here 
again and again. Every Summer Term re- 
peats it in the same old way, and its ver}'^ 
sameness lends it an air of solemnity. Only 
the other day it occurred for this year. The 
class of '73 has passed out of our chapel walls 
forever. In a few short weeks they will take 
their last adieu of Alma Mater, and then pass 
on to find their place and station in the outer 
Avorld. Although personal acquaintance with 
them has not been ours in many cases, we 
feel when they are gone, tliat we shall sadly 
miss familiar faces, and at the same time as 
wo say good-bye we cannot but add our 
Avishes for their prosperity. , 



The Junior Class, with Prof. Morse, took 
their zoological excursion to Lookout Point, 
instead of going to Portland harbor, as has 
been the custom of previous classes. The 
reason of this change was that no "pass" 
was granted over the railroad. Professor 
Morse wrote to the manager of the road, re- 
questing the customary favor, and stating 
that unless the pass was granted the Class 
M'ould not go to Portland — thus no money 
would be lost to the railroad by doing an act 
of kindness. 

The Railroad President, Superintendent, 
Manager (we don't know the title) did not 
even condescend to reply. 

This is not only a new illustration of the 



soullessness of corporations in general, but it 
is also a proof that one of the Maine Central 
Railroad's highest officials did not in one par- 
ticular case show the common courtesies of a 
gentleman. 

It is a well known fact that Bowdoin stu- 
dents pour not a little monej^ into the coffers 
of this corporation ; and when we remember 
that other raikoads, especially those of Mas- 
sachusetts and the West, grant free passes to 
college professors and to students on occasions 
like the one in question, it becomes apparent 
how little of the moral qualitj- is needed to 
run the Maine Central Railroad. 



A funny little paper appeared on the bul- 
letin board, the other day, that seemed to 
cause considerable good humor among gentle- 
men of a military turn of mind. As the " old 
veterans," one after another, went up to read 
it, there was something quite amusing in the 
expressions of their faces — at first full of 
gravity and inquisitiveness, then giving signs 
of ease and carelessness, next showing satis- 
faction bordering upon happiness, and finally 
blooming out into some of the rosiest smiles 
that ever graced the sons of Adam. Every 
man of them left the bulletin board carrying 
with him this peculiarly happy frame of mind 
and great expressiveness of countenance. 

What was the matter ? Why, that " No- 
tice to Invalids " had come at last, beginning 
with the ever ominous words, " on and after 
date," and continuing in such a manner as to 
give the immilitary class of youths the im- 
pression that their pi-esence at gymnasium 
four hours a week would be considered a fair 
equivalent for three hours of Infantry drill. 

The invalids put on as much of a military 
smile as they could muster, wishing to have 
somewhat the appearance of their fellow-men ; 
and yet they felt, no doubt, as if everybody 
thought them the victims of a grand and seri- 
ous joke. 



44 



BOWDOm OBIENT. 



The effect of the notice in a practical way 
was immediate. " On date " a motley throng 
of individuals assembled under the shadow of 
old Memorial, and then and there did register 
the names and natures of their bodily afflic- 
tions in the Director's book. 

Then, after a general shaking of hands, 
and warm congratulations on the privilege of 
being present on this happy occasion, it was 
unanimously decreed to hold an exhibition of 
the gymnastic talent of the "Invalid Corps " 
at the close of the present term. Admission 
fee will probably be seventeen cents, and the 
proceeds devoted to furnishing crutches and 
excuse-papers to the generations tliat shall 
come after. 

If this Exhibition takes place, all will be 
done that the lame and halt can do to make 
it a first-class success. 



COMMUNICATION. 

To the Editors of the Orient. 

Dear Sirs, — Our friend, the editor of the 
Telegraph, believes in the drill. He loves martial 
displa3^ It pleases him greatly to feast his ej'es 
on the unfortunate youth of Bowdoin as they 
pursue their dismal course over the campus to 
the warlike strains of the Band. We respect 
his sentiments. We do not begrudge him the 
pleasure as long as the exliibition is necessi- 
tated. But we cannot help expressing our 
opinions of his criticism on Extra Drill, Target 
Practice, etc., if only for our own satisfaction. 
We append some extracts : — 

" While a few of the college students are 
shirking military drill, and commencing life in 
the most shiftless way, there are others who 
not only do their whole duty, but take an 
honest pride in doing it." 

Oh, that upon these youthful brows the 
seal of an aindess, useless manhood should be 
set, merely for cutting drill in college ! As if 
the only men of energy and ability among us 
were those who are enthusiastically devoted 



to this incessant drilling, drilling, drilling, to 
the detriment of higher and more important 
discixjline. 

We would have the editor understand that 
there is an intellectual smartness that is as 
much above that which finds its satisfaction 
in warlike mimicry, as brains are above muscle. 
We quote again: — 

" And while alluding to this matter, we 
may as well say that the young fellows who 
shirked the parade of Frida}' last for target 
practice, did themselves no credit." 

Yes, boysi you miglit as well come to the 
conclusion that it was a liighly dishonorable 
performance for you to object to giving up a 
whole afternoon to tliat little walk of six or 
eight miles, loaded with guns and accoutre- 
ments, for a little practice in shooting at a 
target. Oh, boys, do run down there at once 
and fire your gun at something, if you ever 
expect to make life a success ! 

But why did you do yourselves no credit ? 

" In the first place the day was very fine, 
just cool enough for the march." We do not 
doubt, nay we know from personal experience 
that it was just as fine and cool to those who 
staid at home. 

" And the gunnery practice Avas exceed- 
ingly interesting, witnessed hy a good many jieo- 
ple from the village." 

Oh, what a deep sense of the wrong he 
has done those innocent " Yagers," must sad- 
den the heart of every one of those delinquent 
students ! 

Of how small value was an afternoon of 
study and mental improvement, compared to 
the amusement of that crowd of loafers ! 
But if we say more we shall disclose our 
sentiments upon the general question of the 
drill," and this we don't wish to do. 

X. 



A Sophomore has counted one hundred 
and thirteen black felt hats in College, and 
begs us to make it public. 



BOWDOIN OBIENT. 



45 



LOCAL. 

The campus is looking finely. 

No new developments in dogs. 

What man can keep his boots shining ? 

Do you patronize Wallie's new fountain? 

"Ever Blest" made his first appearance 
last Sabbath. 

Some thirt}^ " liberally educated " men are 
roaming at large through the town. 

Go down to the river and see the " six" 
pull. If you can't pass your judgment on 
their stroke, you derive some pleasure from a 
contemplation of their fantastic dress. 

A volunteer company of fort}^ Cadets has 
been formed, with a view to competing for 
the prize flag in Portland on July 4tli. They 
are drilled by Maj. Sanger. The officers have 
not yet been chosen. 

The Fortieth Annual Convention of the 
Psi Upsilon Fraternity was held with the Zeta 
Chapter of Dartmouth, on Thursday, June 5th. 
A. J. Boardman and W. H. Moulton repre- 
sented the Kappa Chapter of this College. 

Two Freshmen were detected, in the rear 
of Maine Hall the other evening, busily 
" coaching '' each other in the finished swing- 
ing of two laths, in view of the impending 
arrival of their class canes. They fled at the 
approach of man. 

The following Sophomores have been ap- 
pointed for the Prize Declamation : C. L. 
Clarke, W. J. Curtis, E. H. Hall, C. W. Hill, 
W. G. Hunton, E. S. Osgood, F. B. Osgood, 
P. P. Simmons, Myles Standish, H. R. True, 
F. R. Upton, F. P. Virgin. 

It is useless for Sophomores, after return- 
ing from Hops, to inform theii- hackmen in 
the darkness of the night that they will " set- 
tle" the next day. The hackmen have 
acquired a pleasant habit of noting the young 



ladies' residences, and of calling upon them 
the next day for the "fares," much to the 
indignation of pecunious papas. 

A Senior, recently, writing the customary 
form of autograph in his classmate's album, 
inadvertently repeated the your, making it 
read, " yoiu-, your true friend." The recipient 
of this piece of chirography remarked : " It's 
all right — they'll think he stutters." 

The first regular meeting of the Athenean 
Society under the new departure was a re- 
markably good one. Both in good order, 
numbers present, and the general interest 
manifested, it exceeded the expectations of 
its most hopeful supporters. The programme 
was well carried out — some of the parts 
showing careful preparation. It looks as if 
the members mean business this time. 

As Mr. Pierce's photographic ambulance 
was engaged in taking crippled views from 
the College campus, the other afternoon, two 
constables, mistaking it for a countryman's 
cider cart, made a descent thereon ; appl3'ing 
their prohibitory noses to the nitrate of silver, 
they declared that " a man who would sell 
such mean cider as that didn't deserve to be 
fined," and hastily left the grounds with ex- 
pressions of supreme disgust. 

The Exhibition for the '68 Prize took place 
in Lemont Hall on the evening of June 2d. 
The order of exercises was as follows : — 

William the Silent W. A. Blake. 

The Relation of the Age to Religion and Culture. 

J. F. Elliot. 

Religion as an Intuition A. E. Herrick. 

Is our Ago Degenerate ? A. F. Moulton. 

Creeds CM. Walker. 

Modern Progress in China F. A. Wilson. 

The committee. President Chamberlain, 
Prof. J. S. Sewall and Major Sanger, awarded 
the prize to W. A. Blake. 

After a sleep of eight years Ivy Day has 
been revived by the Junior Class. Appro- 
priate exercises were held in the Chapel, 



46 



BOWBOIN ORIENT. 



Wednesday, June 4th, according to the pro- 
gramme given in our last number. Tlie Fac- 
ulty and students were nearly all present, and 
many ladies from Brunswick and Bath graced 
the occasion with their presence. At the 
close of the literary exercises, the iyj, or the 
vine that was substituted for it, was planted, 
each member of the class gravely covering 
the precious roots with his own peculiar 
trowelful of earth. The singing of the ode 
closed this pleasant little festivity, and the 
dance at the hall in the evening to many was 
a fitting cap to this climax. 

The following assignment of Parts is 

made for Commencement in the Senior Class 

of 1873: — 

Salutatory Oration in Latin, Aug. F. Moultou 
Oration, W. A. Blake ; Oration, N. D. A. Clarke 
Oration, P. C. Robinson ; Oration, C. M. Walker 
Oration, F. E. Whitney ; Oration, F. A. Wilson 
Philosophical Disquisition, H. W. Chapman ; Philo- 
sophical Disquisition, G-. S. Mower; Philosophical 
Disquisition, D. A. Robinson ; Literary Disquisition, 
L. F. Berry ; Literary Disquisition, J. M. Boothby ; 
Literary Disquisition, J. P. Elliot; Literary Disqui- 
sition, A. E. Herrick ; Literary Disquisition, H. B. 
Hill; Literary Disquisition, C. C. Sampson; Lit- 
erary Disquisition, F. S. Waterhouse ; Disquisition, 
B. T. Deering; Disquisition, P. M. Hatch; Discus- 
sion, A. J. Boardman ; Discussion, A. L. Crocker; 
Discussion, A. C. Fairbanks; Discussion, P. A. 
Floyd ; Discussion, R. E. Gould ; Discussion, J. 
M. Lowell ; Dissertation, E. J. Cram ; Dissertation, 
J. A. Cram; Dissertation, I. L. Elder; Dissertation, 
G. E. Hughes ; Dissertation, A. G. Ladd; Disserta- 
tion, A. P. Wiswell. 

Reading-Room Election. — President, W. 
T. Goodale ; Vice President, W. G. Hunton ; 
Secretary and Treasurer, W. S. Thompson ; 
Committee, H. V. Moore, G. F. McQuillan, 
William Alden. 

Peucinian Election. — President, C. M. 
Ferguson ; Vice President, T. Kneeland ; Or- 
ator, H. V. Moore ; Poet, T. C. Simpson ; 
Secretary, E. H. Hall ; Treasurer, F. B. Os- 
good. 1st Committee, W. T. Goodale ; 2d, 
Myles Standish ; 3d, A. Sandford. 1st Libra- 
rian, W. T. Goodale ; 2d, P. P. Simmons ; 3d, 
E. A. P. Yates. 1st Editor, G. C. Springer; 
2d, G. C. Cressy ; 3d, F. V. Wriglrt. 



JUKE. 

' Give me a month," said the Summer, 

Demanding of Satm-e a boon, 
' That shall make surly Winter forgotten, 

And be with all sweet things in tune ! 

' The skies must be blue — the Sun golden — 
Love must light the white lamp of the Moon." 
The great Mother smiled, and she kissed her, 
And the smile and the kiss were — June ! 

— Aldine. 



COLLEGE NEWS. 



Gilmore's band, Arbuckle and Miss Ade- 
laide Phillips will furnish tlie music for Com- 
mencement Concert at Bates College. 

A fair junioress, who should be more 
guarded in her choice of Avords, on being 
asked at the supper-table as to the studies 
pursued by a certain one of her gender in col- 
lege, answered that Miss J. was in no regular 
course, but was " scattered all through." " I 
must have found pait of her to-daj^" remarked 
a wag at the other end of the table, " for I 
picked up a waterfall on the campus." — Chron- 
icle. 

Our latest information is that Dr. Newhall 
will enter upon his duties as President of tlte 
University in April, 1874. Zion's Hurald of 
the 17th inst., speaks thus of him : " We con- 
gratulate the College at Delaware upon their 
success in winning so admirable a chief officer, 
and prophesy for the institution an era of in- 
creased prosperity." Dr. Newhall will proba- 
bly be with us at the next Commencement. — 
Western Collegian. 

A " University Club " was started in St. 
Louis last Spring by Eastern college men, 
which has since grown very rapidly in popu- 
larity, notwithstanding the fact that its mem- 
bers consist exclusively of college-bred men. 
Its membership now numbers nearly one hun- 
dred, many of the colleges in the country 
being represented. There are representatives, 
also, of foreign universities. Its officers are 
many of the high dignitaries in the State, on 
the bench and in the pulpit. It is the first 
institution of the kind in this country, so its 
projectors are jubilant over its success. — The 
Dartmouth. 



BOWBOIN ORIENT. 



47 



The College Spectator, under the heading 
of " Book Notices," gives several specimens 
from "Forget me not," a volume of poems by 
L. E. C, and says they are " charmingly orig- 
inal." We should think they were. Read 
the following : — 

A VISIT TO THE CESIETERT. 

" Two tiny jrraves side by side — 
"What is the name upon the stone ? Bristers ! 

After a short illness uieu, 

Susy and Miuuie, little twin sisters." 

ONLY ONE EVE. 

" I loved the gentle girl. 

But oh ! I heaved a sigh, 
"When first she told me she could see 

Out of only one eye. 

" In the home -n-here tvo all are hastening — 
In our eternal home on high, 
See that you be not rivalled 
By the girl with only one eye." 

The students of the Academic Department have 
petitioned the Governor for a militia company to be 
formed from the Junior and Sophomore classes. 
The experiment has been .successfully made at Bow- 
doin, the State furnishing guns and uniforms, to- 
gether with a certain amount each year for keeping 
an arsenal in order. — The Dartmouth. 

The experiment has certainly been made 
at Bowdoin, but all here are not quite agreed 
that it has met with complete success. It has 
not failed, but there are many who feel that 
a college devoted to literary studies is not the 
best place in the world in which to found a 
military school ; consequently there is a 
marked lack of interest in the field exercises. 
How much the State furnishes toward keep- 
ing an arsenal in order, we are not informed ; 
but we can say, in all confidence, that those 
who have uniforms best know whence the 
money came to pay the tailor. The State has 
not furnished a cent in this direction. 



The financial condition of the Orient 
being such as to warrant it, we have thought 
best to be represented at the International 
Exhibition not only by a copy of our paper 
but also by one of the editors. L. H. Kim- 
ball sailed from New York for Europe on the 
4th inst., and if skies are fair and winds pro- 
pitious, he will doubtless arrive in due time 
at Vienna. 



TIME TABLE. 
Trains leave Brunswick for — 

Augusta — 8.30 A.il. ; 2.35 and 7,00 p.m.; 1.50 

A.M. (Pull.) 
Bangor — 2.35 p.m. ; 1.50 a.m. (Pull.) 
Bath — 7.40 and 8.30 a.m. ; 2.30, 5.10 and 7.00 

P.M. 

Boston — 7.38 a.m. ; 2.05 and 5.00 p.m. ; 12 m. 

(Pull.) 
Farmington— 2.30 p.m. 
Lewiston — 7.40 a.m. ; 2..30 and 7.00 p.m. 
Portland— 7.38 a.m. ; 2.05 aud 5.00 p.m. ; 12 m. 

(Pull.) 
Waterville — 2.35 p.m. ; 1.50 a.m. (Pull.) 



BUSINESS CARDS. 



S TROUT & HOLMES, 
CorSSELORS AT LAW, 

No. 88 Middle Street (Canal Bank BuUding), PORTLAND, ME. 

A. A. STROCT. GEO. F. HOLMES ('66). 

JOSEPH A. LOCKE (Bowdoin, '65), Attorney and Counsellor at Law, 
74 Middle Street, cor. Exchange Street, PORTLAND. 

JOSIAII H. DRVJIMOND (Colby, 'i6) CounseUor at Law, 100 Exchange 
street, PORTLAND. 



NOYES, HOLMES & COMPANY, 

219 irashington Sf. and 10 Bromfield St., 
BOSTON, MASS. 

PUBLISHEES AND BOOKSELLEES, 

AND WHOLESALE ASD RETAIL 

STATIONERS, 



AU kinds of COLLEGE AND SCHOOL TE.XT BOOKS, .and STANDARD 
AND MISCELLANEOUS LITERATURE, supplied at 

LOW PRICES. 

Orders by Mail or E.\press will receive prompt and careful attention. 
These books may be obtained through J. P. BICKFORD, Agent, No. 21 
Maine Hall. 

DIVIMTY SCHOOL OF HAEVAED UNIVEESITT 

This School 13 open to persons of all denominations. Pecuniary aid is 
afforded to those who are needy and deserving. 
The next academic year will begin 

SEPTE5IBER 26th. 

Further information will be given on application to 

Pbof. OLIVER STEARNS, D.D., 
Or Pbof. E. J. YOUNG, 

Cambridge, Mass. 



48 



BOWBOIJ^ ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Classical Department. 

TERMS OF ADMISSION. 

Candidates for admission Into the Freshman Class are examined as fol- 
lows : — 

Harkness'a Latin Grammar, including Prosody, Parts I. and EE. Hark- 
ness's Introduction to Latin Prose Composition; A^irgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the iEueid; Cicero's Select Orations; Sallust. 

Hadley's or Goodwia's Greek Grammar; Goodwin's Greek Reader; or 
Xenophon's Anabasis, 4 books, and Homer's Iliad, 2 books. 

Arithmetic; Algebra, to equations of the second degree; Davies's 
Legendre's Geometry, first and third books. 

English Granunar; Ancient and Modern Geography. 



Scientific Department. 



TERMS OF ADMISSION. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the following subjects : — 
Mathematics — Arithmetic, including Common and Decimal Frac- 
tions. Interest, and Square Root; Algebra, to Equations of the 
Second Begree; Gieometry, Books I. and HI. of Davies's Le- 
gend re. 
Geography — Political Geography, and simple elements of Astrono- 
mical aud Physical Geography. 
History — Leading facts in general History, and especially in Ameri- 
can History. 
Latin — Allen's Latin Grammar, or the equivalent. 
English — The examination will consist in 1st, Reading aloud a pas- 
sage from some standard author, with explanations of gram- 
matical construction, and definition and derivation of words; 2d, 
Writing a few sentences in English, on some familiar subject, 
reference being had to spelling and punctuation as well as to 
composition; 3d Correction^ of ungrammatical sentences com- 
posed for the purpose. 
All candidates for admission must produce certificates of their good 
moral character. 

The time for admission is the Friday after Commencement, and the 
first Thursday of the first term. la exceptional cases applicants may be 
examined at other times. 



Courses of Study. 

The regular course of Instruction is that commended by the leading 
colleges of the country as eminently adapted_to secure liberal culture. 

THE SCIENTIFIC COURSE 

has been recently organized. Thurty-four students have already entered, — 
a fact which Indicates that the College has been successful In its effort to 
meet the demand for a liberal course of study which shall at the same 
time look towards the actual uses and applications of knowledge. 

The studies pursued in this coui'se are comprised in the following: — 
Languages — English one year, and optional two ; Latin one year, 
optional three ; French one year, optional three ; German one 
year, optional two ; Spanish, ItaUan, Swedish, Anglo-Saxon, one 
year. 
Mathematics — Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, Mensuration, 
Spherical Trigonometry, Analytical Geometry ; Differential and 
Integral Calculus, with the application of these to Surveying, 
Navigation, Projections, Dialling, Levelling, Astronomy, Mechan- 
ics, Topographical and Hydrographical Engineering. 
Natural History— Qeology^ Mineralogy, Botany, Zoology, with their 
relations to the Indu-^trial Arts. 



Natural Philosophy — Mechanics, Hydrodynamics, Pneumatics, 
Optics, Astronomy, Light, Heat, Electricity, &c. 

Chemistry — In all its branches and applications. 

History and Political Science — General, Medieval and Modern His- 
tory, Political Economy, General Principles of Law, Interna 
tional Law, Law of Evidence, Constitution of United States, 
Theory of Government, American Law. 

Philosophy — Rhetoric, Logic, Psychology, Metaphysics, Evidences 
of Natural and Revealed Religion, Ethics, Esthetics. 

The studies of the first two years are common throughout the Depart- 
ment and are Intended to lay a broad and substantial foundation for all 
branches of subsequent study. In the last two years the studies are 
arranged in distinct courses, in accordance with certain leading objects : a 
general scientific culture, or special technical skill. Attention is particu- 
larly invited to the facilities ofiered for the thorough study of Civil Engi- 
neering. 



A POST-GRADUATE COURSE 



which Instruction will be given : 



of two years is also commenced, i 
the following schools : — 

I. Letters — Comprising Languages, Ancient and Modern (includ- 
ing the Oriental) with theu" literatures ; Philology ; Rhetoric; 
Logic ; History ; Elocution ; the Fine Arts. This leads to the 
degree of Master of Arts. 

n. Science — Advanced Mathematics, Physics, Natural History and • 
Chemistry, in their uses and applications. This leads to the 
degree of Doctor of Science. 

m. Philosophy — Comprising the above, considered in their reasons 
and relations ; Psychology, Metaphysics, Ethics, Esthetics ; Poli- 
tics ; Theory of Government, Constitutional History, Principles 
of Law, International Law. Leading to the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy. 

rV. Medicine — ^The Medical School of Maine. Degree, — ^M. D. 

Students who are not graduates will be received on satisfactory evi- 
dence of proficiency in study which will enable them to profit by this 
Course. 

Much and careful attention is given to Physical Culture under the train- 
ing of accomplished Instructors. The Gymnasium is well provided with 
approved apparatus, and the opportunities for Military drill and discipline 
are of the very best. 

It is but just to say that good morals and manliness are distinguishing 
features of college life at Bowdoin. 

The Library of Bowdoin is one of rare value, and the choicest works 
are constantly added. The Gallery of Paintings is well known to be one of 
the most remarkable in the country. The Cabinet and apparatus are 
ample for their purpose. 

The annual expenses are, for tuition, &c., $90. Board $2.50 and $4.00 
a week. Pecuniary assistance, from the income of thirty scholarships and 
various other benefactions, is rendered to those who are unable fully to 
meet their expenses otherwise. 

Commencement July 10th. Examination for admission July 13th and 
Aug. 28th, at 9 a.m. 

First term begins Aug. 28th, at evening. 

Every encouragement will be given to persons who desire to pursue 
any study taught in the College. 

The town of Brunswick, situated on tide water — the Androscoggin River 
on one side and the Ocean on the other ; already a seat of various manu- 
factures and destined to become one of the principal railroad centres of the 
State, easy also of access from all quarters, — presents an excellent locality 
for scientific as well as literary pursuits, while the facilities afforded by 
Bowdoin College, its Libraries, Galleries of Art, Cabinets, Scientific Col- 
lections, Laboratories, and Apparatus, offer great inducements to the ear 
nest student of the Useful and Liberal Arts 



Vol. III. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JUNE 25, 1873. 



No. 5. 



■Written for the Orieni'. 

REMINISCENCES. 
III. 

EXTRACTS FROM MY DIARY. 

The greater part of the year 1837 was 
spent in Europe, and chiefly in London, Paris 
and Dublin. We often hear the remark " that 
truth is stranger than fiction." I would have 
no one suppose that I have any thing mar- 
velous to say, or even extraordinary ^jo- se, 
for I have not, it is only an extraordinary 
coincidence that 1 refer to — and an extraor- 
dinary coincidence has its own suggestions to 
arouse the sensibilities of one who is in a 
foreign land and far removed from country, 
friends and home. One morning in September 
Mr. Petty Vaughan called at my lodgings and 
invited me to a dinner party at his Uncle's, 
Mr. William Vaughan, on the day following, 
seven o'clock p.m. being the hour for the 
company to assemble. As Mr. Vaughan's res- 
idence was within a twenty minutes' walk 1 
could easily time my departure to reach my 
destination punctually at the appointed time. 
I had passed the Bank of England, also the 
Royal Exchange, had just crossed Lombard 
street and traversing Grace Church street, 
when my attention was attracted by the unu- 
sual appearance of the moon. I soon discov- 
ered the cause of the phenomenon was an 
eclipse, and it was evident the obscuration 
would be total. I tarried a few minutes con- 
templating the scene. Of course it brought 
up to my mind the same occurrence of thirty- 
twoyears before, and of the Vaughans coming 
down from Hallowell to assist in the observa- 
tions then made at Bowdoio College ; and 
now I was on m}- way to their residence in 
London, returning their visit. When I reached 



Mr. Vaughan's house I was the only laggard. 
The whole compan}' were assembled in the 
library, and a servant showing me in,l found 
all talking of the eclipse. The company were, 
besides our hosts, Mr. Vaughan and Mr. Petty 
Vaughan, Mr. Vaux of Philadelphia ; he was 
Secretary of Legation, and in the absence of 
Mr. Stevenson, our Minister to the English 
Court, was acting as Charge; Professor Rob- 
inson, then of the Andover Seminary, and his 
wife; also two or three English gentlemen, 
a Russian gentleman and m3'self. After being 
introduced all round, Mr. Petty Vaughan re- 
ferred to the eclipse of 1805 with great 
delight, to his awfully cold ride, and the 
events of that night, and then said : " Doctor, 
I will show you the observations then made 
by your father. They were printed and I 
have them." His hand was raised to reach the 
book, and just then the door opened and a 
servant said: "Mr. Vaughan, dinner is on the 
table." This subordinated everything else. 
Mr. V. immediately turned and said : " Mrs. 
Robinson will you take my arm and walk into 
the dining room ? " 

At the dinner table, besides our hosts, Mr. 
William A''aughan and his nephew, Mr. Petty 
Vaughan, were Professor Robinson and lady, 
from Andover Theological Seminar}^, in the 
United States ; Mr. Vaux of Philadelphia, the 
American Secretary of Legation ; a Russian 
gentleman from Moscow, and three English 
friends of Mr. Vaughan, and myself Mr. 
Stevenson, the United States Minister to En- 
gland, was an invited guest, but not being in 
good health had gone to Scotland to recu- 
perate. I was seated between Mrs. Robin- 
son and one of Mr. Vaughan's English friends, 
who was, I should judge, about seventy-five 



50 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



years of age. Mrs. Robinson is a German 
lady, and has. the German face, complexion 
and dialect. She was very affable, and con- 
versed pleasantly upon whatever chanced to 
be of interest to either of us. She and her 
husband were going to Germany, where she 
would remain with her family relatives while 
her husband was making his explorations in 
Palestine. 

Principally, we talked of America, and the 
social habits and character of society there. 
When a boy I was at school at Phillips Acad- 
emy for nearly a year, and knew much of the 
town and its inhabitants ; consequently we 
had a good deal to say of Andover. 

A week or so before leaving the United 
States, Professor Robinson, witli other cleri- 
cal gentlemen, was invited to go down to 
Boston and assist in a religious service on 
board of a missionary ship, and she went with 
him. The missionaries, each with a newly 
married wife, were on board and ready to sail 
as soon as the ceremonies closed. While 
narrating to me the scene in the cabin of the 
ship, Mrs. Robinson manifested an earnest 
and glowing appreciation of the self-sacrific- 
ing spirit, the trials and sufferings which per- 
haps awaited these missionaries, and her gest- 
ures, her language, and above all her facial 
expression, attested her deep emotional im- 
pulses, and she gave free scope to them all 
while conversing on the subject. She 
dropped her knife and fork, clasped her 
hands, and turning her blue eyes and blonde 
features on me said, " 0, dear sir, it seems 
dreadful to me to look upon these inexperi- 
enced and delicate creatures, and so lovelj^, 
and about to forsake home, country and 
friends, and go among strangers, and perhajjs 
barbarians. They knew not where they were 
going, and nobody could tell them, or what 
would befall them. When I left Germany to 
go to America, I felt much at leaving country 
and friends, but my trials were nothing to 
theirs. I was going to the United States, 



among an educated and cultured people, 
while they perliaps will spend their lives in 
the midst of savages. In all my life I never 
made such an effort to maintain my self-pos- 
session as I did on board that ship. My 
husband tliought I was getting nervous, and 
as soon as service closed hurried me off, and 
glad enough was I to go. I did not want 
those missionaries and strangers to witness 
ray emotions, but as soon as my back was 
turned and the carriage was in motion to go 
to the hotel, I cried right out loud, and heart- 
ily. My husband kept saying, ' Poh ! poh ! 
my dear; don't distress yourself for these 
women ; they were not slow in making their 
choice; no, no, these very people upon whom 
you are bestowing your compassion and 3'our 
tears would be the very last to thank you ; 
they don't want j'our sympathy ; they will 
have good and kind husbands to care for 
them ; all of their needful wants will be pro- 
vided for, and thej' would not go back on 
their past lives if the}' could.' " Mrs. Robin- 
son observed to me that these remarks of her 
husband afforded her great relief No doubt 
they did so. Professor Robinson well knew 
the dangers which awaited his wife if this ner- 
vous excitement was not abated, and he took 
the right course to extinguish it. 

TJie German mind may boast of having 
much of the positive and practical, as we ob- 
serve in such men as Bismarck and Moltke, 
yet its most universal constituent and pre- 
dominant elements are for the abstract, the 
contemplative and the visionary. Any one 
can scarcely fail to observe this in all our 
translations of German thought, whether in 
the patriotic lyrics of Schiller and Korner, or 
the metaph^'sics of Kant. 

Mrs. Robinson was educated in a strong 
faith of the indispensable necessity of barriers 
inrankand caste in the organization of society, 
and could but with great difficulty appreciate 
an educational basis founded upon democratic 
equality. Had she inhaled the bracing 



B WI) OIN ORIENT. 



51 



atmosphere of Plymouth Rock and Massa- 
chusetts Bay a few years, undoubtedly it 
would have toned up her nervous system and 
ventilated some of her supposed innate ideas 
(of German origin), and she might find her- 
self reconstructed and upon a higher plane, 
and side by side with such representative 
men and women as John Robinson, John 
Elliott, Rose Standish, Roger Williams, the 
Winthrops, and Horace Greeley. 

The course, then, of Professor Robinson, 
under the circuaistances, seems justifiable or 
deserving of pilliation. How awkward it 
miglit have beeu to find a case of hysterical 
convulsions on his hands in the ship's cabin, 
or obliged to take her out of the hack in the 
day time to be carried into an apothecary's 
shop to be dosed with assafetida or laved in 
sulphuric ether, any one can judge for him- 
self. Had Mrs. Robinson beeu an American 
woman born, lie would not have spoken a-^ he 
did. Had he done so, the spirits of Milner, 
Martyn and Wilberforce, would have reproved 
him, and he must have sought the beggarly 
sympathies of the Chief Ruler, the Priest or 
the Learned Pharisee. He would have been 
considered neither a philanthropist nor a 
Christian gentleman. 



ACQUAINTANCES. 

Good society is not to be iindervalued, 
and time passed in congenial, entertaining, 
and instructive company is b}' no means to be 
considered as wasted. But there is an im- 
mense amount of time frittered away on those 
whose society is neither profitable, congenial, 
or in any Avay desirable, and as a consequence 
a deal of one's own work left undone. Im- 
portant duties are neglected merely to be 
civil, and purelj' from a cannot-help-j^ourself 
feeling. Such persons as have no other mo- 
tive in making acquaintances than to beg their 
daily happiness from door to door as beggars 
their daily bread, lay a heavy tax upon the 



industrious when they rob them of their time 
by their frivolous visitations, and are anything 
but i^rofitable acquaintances. How often it 
happens that an untimely visit from the last 
person in the world whom one would really 
care to see, frustrates and confuses the entire 
plans for the day. There is not the least need 
of enduring this. Those who have nothing to 
do but chatter to kill their own time and 
waste another's, will be likel}^ to seek more 
congenial company if, regardless of them, the 
regular duties of the day are carried on. 
They certainl}^ have no right to complain if 
one does show signs of being tired of them, 
since if they were not first tired of themselves 
one would never be honored with their com- 
pany. Entertaining others without being in 
anyway profited in return, is the most stupid 
and thankless of tasks. It is time absolutely 
wasted. 

The only true basis for sociability and 
companionship is sympathy of thought or 
similarity of pursuit. It is certainly unwise 
to encourage or permit acquaintanceships 
which are neither pleasurable or beneficial. 
Outside show is often allowed to win its way 
where everything else fails, and a consummate 
bore will for that reason be treated with 
consideration. It too often happens that " he 
is rich " settles at once all questions of equality 
and merit. Such twaddle and nonsense as 
people will endure simply because it happens 
to be gilt-edged, is anything but complimen- 
tary to the mature good sense of mankind. 

When a person has proved himself worthy 
it is soon enough to make advances. Very 
often an individual suddenly thrown into 
one's society is called "very intelligent," 
" very pleasing," or contrariwise. But after 
a short acquaintance how completel}'' one's 
opinions change their complexion. That one 
who does not easil}^ endure all sorts of com- 
panionship and whose habits accommodate 
themselves with difficulty to the peculiarities 
of others, who regard the man first and 



52 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



will not bend to that which is tasteless 
and uncongenial, are not popular, and are apt 
to be called eccentric ; but they enjoy freedom 
from the trammel of unwelcome acquaint- 
ances, and cringing to the unworthy is un- 
known to them. Blessed be such eccentricity. 

Colon. 



BROWN PRIZES. 



Now that the time of competition for the 
Brown prizes is at hand, a few tlionghts are 
suggested in regard to their object and effect. 
Before they were offered there were prizes in 
college for both original and selected decla- 
mations, that had been carefully prepared, 
prizes for the best written essays, and a prize 
for the best extemporaneous speaker and de- 
bater. These various prizes were designed to 
secure the greatest possible fairness to indi- 
vidual merit, for seldom, if ever, are the best 
wi'iter and the best speaker of a class united 
in one individual ; and there are some pos- 
sessing a wonderful ability for extemporaneous 
debate, who would be exceeded by others if 
they had time for reflection. Thus, we see 
that these prizes are intended to reward 
talents of totally different sorts, and rarely 
does an individual secure more than one of 
them. When the prize for extemporaneous 
writing was offered, it was doubtless intended 
to broaden the basis still more, but what is 
the probability ? Do extemporaneous writing 
and speaking bear the same relation to each 
other as the finished essaj^ and the elaborated 
argument? We think not. We have had 
constant exercise in informal extemporaneous 
speaking all our lives, necessarily including 
more or less of argument, and as yet but few 
of us have practiced any other kind. But 
how is the case with our writing ? Since our 
Freshman year we have been required to de- 
posit twenty-nine themes in the box and to 
declaim six times, two of the declamations being 
original and more or less carefully written. 



Thus we see that the specialty of this college 
is writing and not speaking, and the rules 
that apply to the one will not apply to the 
other. 

Had the prize been offered during our 
Freshman year the result might be different, 
for then it would be evident who possessed 
the best natural abilities for a writer. But 
after two years of theme writing the face of 
affairs is changed. Those who wei'e ready 
writers at first are apt to rely too much upon 
that ability and to delay their work until but 
a few hours are left in which to accomplish 
it. The result is they remain where they 
were at first, while others, possessed of less 
natural ability, but more pluck, labor with in- 
defatigable zeal upon their themes until they 
receive the reward of their labor, and we find 
the race is not always to the swift. Finally, 
we believe that after two or three years of 
experience, the best writer of the class " as 
such" will generally write the best extempo- 
raneously, as shown in the record of '73. 



PROVERBS. 
II. 

" Fortune has no power over discretion." 
We rather think she has, for the effect of good 
fortune is generally to drive all discretion out 
of a man's head. When a man fails his pride 
supports him, but when he succeeds it is sure 
to tell his story to everybodj^. 

" Reprove others, but correct thyself." 
Most men find no difficulty in practicing the 
first part of this aphorism, but the last part 
is apt to bother them. 

" Pain is pleasure's shadow." But the 
mischief is that in this case the substance be- 
longs to the shadow, and the emptiness to the 
thing which produces it. 

" He that lies in bed his estate feels it." 
We laid in bed all day once, just to test the 
truth of this, but we couldn't see that it 
affected our estate in the least. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



53 



"Silence is a cheap virtue." But it is 
subject to the well-known law of trade that 
the price of an article is always raised by an 
increase in the demand, and we have seen 
silence demanded until it was not to be had at 
any price. 

" Never have two faces under one hood." 
That may possibly do for a general statement 
but there should certainly be exceptions. Ex- 
travagance of statement is the sin of jaroverbs. 

" Better late than never." Wonder if the 
author of this ever got to the depot just five 
minutes after the train left ? 

" Experience teaches better than precept." 
Well, it seems no more than just that the old 
beldam should, when we consider that every- 
body is ready to furnish us with precepts 
gratis, while exi^erience is 2^1'overhiaUij high in 
her charges for tuition and severe in her disci- 
pline. 

" Idleness is the mother of jioverty." This 
may be so. But we feel a little personal in- 
terest in the matter, for we should just a little 
prefer to own some one else for our grand- 
mother. 

" It is never too late to learn." Still, when 
a man learns that his gun was loaded only by 
its own report of the matter, it is often too 
late for the knowledge to be of any practical 
use to him. 

"Secrecy like dirt will rub out when dry." 
But it never gets dry. " There's the rub." 

"Solitude is often the best of company." 
That might be so if one were always sure that 
when he was in that state he was out of bad 
company. 

" Know thyself was born in heaven." An 
old writer asks us to note that it was never 
stated that it came to earth. From our own 
observation we think we are to be pardoned 
for doubting if this celestial child ever left 
home. 

" Some people make a great hustle and yet 
do nothing." On account of the ambiguous 
meaning of one word in this proverb, we de- 



cline attempting an explanation of it, but will 
simply ask our readers to use their own eyes 
and judge for themselves how far this is true. 



THE ORIGIN OF THINGS. 

It is well to know the rock from which 
one is cleft, the hole of the pit from which 
one is dug. So men have been digging and 
searching for their ancestry, till a chattering 
monkey claims them as his children. Things 
have an origin as well as men, and we find it 
quite as interesting to search it out as to trace 
fancied analogies in the animal kingdom. 

The first standing army of modern times 
was established in the year 1445 by Charles 
VII. of France. England first organized one 
under Charles I. in 16-38, but it was declared 
illegal and disbanded. 

Guns were invented b}^ Swartz, a German, 
about 1378, and were first used by the Vene- 
tians in 1382. Cannon preceded them. There 
is still at Amberg a piece of ordnance inscribed 
1303. At the battle of Cress}-, fought between 
Edward III. and Philip of France, we have 
the first historic mention of them. The Ve- 
netians first employed them on shipboard in 
1544. 

The invention of bells is attributed to 
Paulinus, Bishop of Nola, in Campania, about 
the year 400 b.c. They were originally intro- 
duced into churches as a defence against thun- 
der and lightning. In 945, at Groyland Abbey, 
Lincolnshire, they were first hung in England. 
Chimes were invented at Alost in Belgium, 
1487. 

The invention of clocks is disputed, both 
as to the time and the man. Probably, how- 
ever, they were used in Italy during the ninth 
century. The most ancient clock of which 
we have an authentic account was erected in 
a tower of the palace of Charles V. of France, 
in 1364. These, however, were very rude in- 
struments. 



54 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DUK- 
INa THE COLLEGIATE YEAR AT 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE, 
By THE Class of 1874. 

EDITORS. 

S. v. Cole, L. H. Kimball, 

W. T. GooDALE, D. O. S. Lowell, 

F. W. Hawthorne, P. K. Wheeler, 

H. K. White. 

Terms — $2 00 a year in advance; single copies, 
15 ceuts. 

Address communications to Bowdoin Orient, 
Brunswicli, Maine. 

For sale at 7 Appletou Hall, Bowdoin College. 
Also by J. Griffin and B. G. Deuuison, Brunswick ; 
and A. Williams & Co., 135 Washlugton St., Boston. 



CONTENTS. 
Vol. III., No. 5. — June 2,5, 1873. 

Eeminiscences. Ill 49 

Acquaintances 51 

Brown Prizes 52 

Proverbs. II 62 

The Origin of Things 53 

Editorial 54 

Commencement Programme 55 

Local 56 

College News 59 

Prof. Young deserves the thanks even of 
those who suffer, for his continual sarcastic 
attacks upon the proverbial ignorance of some 
college students in common English branches. 
It is a lamentable but undeniable fact that 
many of us know more of Latin and Greek 
grammars than of English, and those of 
whom this can be said have none too much 
erudition in the classics. We think the origin 
of the evil lies back at the very gateway of 
student life, in the requirements for admis- 



sion. Recall j^our entrance examination and 
you Avill remember that you were stretched 
upon the rack of Latin and Greek the greater 
part of the day : but not a hint was given 
that any knowledge of English was required. 
It may be that the Faculty take it as pre-' 
supposed that all are versed in their mother 
tongue ; but if they do they are greatly de- 
ceived, as subsequent experience must prove. 
Tlie remedy is simple : let English play the 
part to which its importance entitles it in the 
entrance examination ; let the examiners be 
severe and critical here if nowhere else ; let 
the candidate's knowledge of English Gram- 
mar, Geography and American History, be 
searchingly tested. It will be found that this 
is not to be mere child's play. It Avill make 
a vast difference in the student's capability 
to handle the studies of the College course. 
Make a thorough master^' of English abso- 
lutely essential to an admission to College 
and it will be attained. We shall not then 
find College students who cannot tell where 
an English verb is made, and, Ave doubt not, 
Prof. Sewall's task of correcting themes will 
become much less arduous. 



The vitality displayed by the Peucinian 
and Athenean in the present vigorous effort 
to revive their decaying strength, certainly 
surpasses anything in their late history. 
Meetings for debate and general literary ex- 
ercises are held in each society fortnightly, 
and we think with general success. Certainly 
if there is any good prospect (and we think 
there is) of reviving tlie ancient glories of 
Peucinian and Athenean, it becomes every 
member to take hold with a will. We hope that 
not only will general excellence be attained 
in both, but that the old spirit of rivalry may 
again take possession of tliem. If the St. 
Croix prize could become an object of compe- 
tition between the two societies as well as 
among individual students, they would elect 



BOWBOIN ORIENT. 



55 



as their representatives their best debaters, 
and not choose men because the}' do or do not 
belong to this or that secret society, as some- 
times, yes, often, we fear, has been the case. 
The prize belongs to the members of the 
two societies ; each one has a claim to the 
competition. And though manifestly all can 
not be contestants, yet those who, if such a 
general comiDetition were possible, would be 
most likelj' to win, have an undeniable right 
to be chosen. It is not a matter of option 
with the electors. It is not a matter of \yev- 
sonal preference or general popularity. The 
sole test is ability in debate, and no member 
has a right to reject this criterion. We say 
to the members of the two societies, go on 
in this worthy enterprise and we prophesy 
there can be no failure. 



On Saturday last the Peucinian Society 
closed its regular meetings for the year. After 
the exercises of the evening, it was moved 
that Avhen the society adjourned it should be 
until the second Saturday of the Fall Term, 
after which some general remarks were of- 
fered by the members, on the prospects of the 
society. Much interest was manifested and 
a determination on the part of all present to 
make the meetings next Fall still more at- 
tractive. The society then adjourned, having 
enjoj'ed, as was universally acknowledged, 
the most interesting meetuig of the term. 



The upper story of Massachusetts Hall is 
fast assuming a museum-like appearance. The 
treasures of Adams Hall, which is a literal 
Curiosity Shop, are being brought to light and 
transferred to their new quarters ; and when 
the archaeological, conchological, entomolog- 
ical, geological, ichthyological, mineralogical, 
ornithological, paleontological and zoological, 
specimens are pi'operly arranged, we draw the 
logical conclusion that they will present an 
imposing array. 



immttim:tim©tl W^A. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE, JULY 6-12, 1873. 



SUNDAY. 
Baccalaureate before the Graduating Class, at tbe Congre- 
gatiouaL Church, at four o'clock p.m. 

ilOXDAX. 

Prize Declamation by the Junior Class, at the Congre- 
gational Church, at 7+ o'clock p.m. 

TUESDAY. 
Adilress before the Alumui, at the Church, at 3 o'clock p.m., 
by Ker. Prof. D. K. Goodwin, d.d., of Philadelphia. 
From the Church the Alumni will adjourn to Memorial 
Hall, where the Annual Meeting of the Associaticm 
will be held. Procession will form at the Chapel and 
move at ii.50 p.m. 

In the evening a Concert will be given in the 
Church, bv the Germania Band, of Boston, assisted 
by Mrs. J. M. Osgood, the Temple Quartette, and 
two eminent Soloists. Doors opeu at 7 o'clock. Con- 
cert to commence at 8 o'clock. 

WEDNESDAY. 

©ommcuccmciit 2>a»v 

The House will be open for Ladies at 10 a.m., of which 
notice will be given by the bell. Admission to the 
Transepts by tickets at 9.30 a.m. The E.xercises will 
commence at 10.30 o'clock, and proceed according to 
the printed Order. The Procession will form at the 
Chapel, and move at 10.15 a.m. President's Reception, 

8 P.M., 

THURSDAY. 
The Pni Bet.a Kappa Fraternity will hold their An- 
nual Meeting at the Medical Lecture Room, Adams 
Uall, at 8 o'clock a.m. 

The Annual Meeting of the Maine Historical 
Society will be held at their Library Room at 8 
o'clock a.m. 

The Cleaveland Museum op Natural History 
will be opened with appropriate exercises at 10 a.m. 
Addresses by Nehemiah Cleaveland, ll.d., and others. 

(gjcrci^cS of ©laS^ S»ai). 

The Public Exercises will commence with an Oration 
and Poem at the Congregational Church, at H o'clock 
P.M., and be coutinued under the Old Oak Tree, by tbe 
Class Chronicles, Prophecy, Parting Address, and other 
ceremonies. Seats around the Tree will be reserved for 
those who present tickets from the Graduating Class, 
after the Exercises in the Church are concluded. 
Note. — The Public Rooms will be opened on Thurs- 
day from EIGHT to ten o'clock a.m. 
FRIDAY. 
Examination of Candidates for admission to the several 
classes, at 9 a.m., in the Medical Lecture Room, Adams 
Hall. 

©arb to tU spiiblic. 

The Senior Class would invite the attention of the Pub- 
lic to the Concert, Tuesday evening. They take pleas- 
ure in announcing that they have secured the services 
of the Germania Band, of Boston, accompanied by two 



56 



BOWBOIN ORIENT. 



eminent Soloists, Mrs. J. M. Osgood, Soprano, and the 
Temple Quartette. 

Railroad Trains. 

Trains for BntiisiticI,'. 
Leave Portland 7 a.m., 1, 5.30 p.m., 12.1.5 night express. 
" Lewiston 6.30 a.m., 12.50, 5.30 p.m. 
" AugHsta 6 A.M., 12.15, 3.15, 10.30 p.m. 
" Bath 7, 9.30 a.m., 1.30, 4.30, 6.30 p.m. 

Trains from Brunsicicl: 
For Portland 7.38 a.m., 2.05, 5.12 p.Jt. night express. 
" Lewiston 7.40, 8.10 a.m., 2.30, 7 p.m. 
" Augusta 2.30, 8.30 a.m., 2.35, 7 p.m. 
" Bath 7.40, 8.30 a.m., 2.30, 7 p.m. 
US" An extra train for Bath will leave Brunswick im- 
mediately after the Concert, Tuesday evening. 



LOCAL. 



Wliite pauts. 

Commencement is coming. 

'76 will " snp " at Pinkham's. 

"Duns" have a peculiar knock. 

Boating men sleep in trundle-beds. 

The College fence is receiving a coat of 
white wash. 

Juniors regard the empty Senior seats with 
longing eyes. 

The bulletin boards are all " broken out " 
with advertisements of second-hand furniture. 

D. Pratt has started for Boston with three 
dollars in his pocket and three spring over- 
coats on his arm. 

A class group of '73, taken from the south 
steps of Adams, attracts great attention at 
Mr. Pierce's rooms. 

Juniors will compete for the Brown prizes 
for extemporaneous composition on the after- 
noon of June 25th. 

J. N. McClintock, '67, of the U. S. Coast 
Survey, is giving instruction to the Scientifics 
in topographical engineering. 

The annual examinations are rapidly ap- 
proaching, and Freshmen's pockets are preg- 
nant with " ponies " and pocket lexicons. 



'75 has been denied the customary adjourn 
for their " class ride,'' the Faculty being of the 
opinion that they ride enough at all times. 

Playing poker for soda water is a harmless 
pastime, but asking a man to enumerate his 
vices when no music is near, is unpardonable. 

The class canes for '76 have arrived. 
Deft and dexterous digits encased in straw- 
colored kids will swing them at the Baccalau- 
reate. 

Geo. Price, " coacher " of the college six, 
arrived last week. He is confident that Bow- 
doin will sit in the winning "packet" at 
Springfield. 

Sodom boasts of two Hottentots who may 
daily " be seen gathering " whole plugs of to- 
bacco and illustrated newspapers, from the 
rooms under their charge. 

There were thirteen competitors for the 
Senior Prize Essay. The first two Prizes were 
awarded to Moulton and Elliot, respectively ; 
and the second to Mower and Floj'd. 

The College Band plays popular polkas 
under the old oak tree, two evenings eacli 
wdek. In the absence of ladies. Freshmen 
seize and whirl each other about upon the 
green sward, while yearning " yaggers " peep 
from behind the hedge. 

A "Commencement number" of the Ori-. 
ENT will appear on or about July 7th. It 
will contain some new features. " The True 
Story of Helicon College " will be told in 
verse, and there will also be an account of the 
first Bowdoin Commencement. 

The blast of a horn has not disturbed the 
quiet of the night since the annual Sophomoric 
raid in the fall term. '76, ever progressive, 
has ordered horns of a " new and improved " 
pattern from Boston, and Sophomores about 
this time grow fond of the freight depots and 
express office. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



57 



The Rho U's have " swung out " with a 
very neat and tastj^ gold badge in the form of 
a maltese cross. It has the Greek letters en- 
graved on one side and the class on the other, 
and, being suspended from the watch-chain, 
has quite a charminff effect. 

" Wanos shook the urn " for '74 on the 
afternoon of June 12th. As usual, there was 
a great passion for " rooming alone," which, 
in many cases, was very attenuated. The 
result verified the scriptural prophecy that the 
" first shall be last and the last, first." 

The following have been appointed for tlie 
Junior Prize Declamation : A. G. Bradstreet, 
M. W. Davis, S. V. Cole, C. M. Ferguson, 
W. T. Goodale, I. S. Locke, D. O. S. Lowell, 
E. N. Merrill, H. W. Philbrook, A. H. Pow- 
ers, C. C. Springer, F. K. Wheeler, H. G. 
White. 

One of the great attractions of Commence- 
ment Week will be the Concert, Tuesday 
evening. The Class of '73 have engaged the 
services of the Germania Band, the Temple 
Quartette, and Mrs. J. M. Osgood of Boston. 
The concert will be one of the finest ever 
given in Brunswick. 

The officers of the volunteer company 
(E), are as follows : Captain, E. Gerry, Jr., 
'74 ; 1st Lieutenant, F. W. Hawthorne, '74 ; 
2d Lieutenant, C. F. Kimball, '74 ; 1st Ser- 
geant, I-I. G. White, '74 ; 2d Sergeant, W. H. 
Moulton, '74 ; 3d Sergeant, H. V. Moore, '74 ; 
Corporals, Hobbs, Pike, Gordon and Pierce. 
The company propose to give an exhibition 
drill in Lemont Hall on or about June 25th. 

The following appointments are hereby 
announced for officers and non-commissioned 
officers in the Battalion of Bowdoin Cadets : — 

Adjutant, L. H.Kimball; Quarter Master, Simp- 
sou ; Sergeant Major, Cole ; Q. M. aud Ordnance 
Sergeant, Philbrook. 

Company A. — Captain, Gerry; 1st Lieutenant, 
Hobbs ; 2d Lieutenant, Johnson ; 1st Sergeant, Pay- 
son ; 2d Sergeant, 'Davis ; 3d Sergeant, Hemmen- 
way ; 4th Sei'geant, Springer ; 1st Corporal, Pierce ; 



2d Corporal, Huuton; 3d Corporal, Thompson; 4th 
Corporal, Hall. 

Compnnii B. — Captain, H. G. White; 1st Lieu- 
tenant, Hawthorne ; 2d Lieutenant, Merrill ; 1st 
Sergeant, Bickford ; 2d Sergeant, Pray ; 3d Ser- 
geant, Palmer; 4th Sergeant, Ferguson; 1st Cor- 
poral, Hunter; 2d Corporal, H. K. White; 3d Cor- 
poral, Brook; 4th Corporal, Upton. 

Companii C. — Captain, C. F. Kimball; 1st Lieu- 
tenant, Moore ; 2d Lieutenant, Pike ; 1st Sergeant, 
Bradstreet ; 2d Sergeant, Howard ; 3d Sergeant, F. 
K. Wheeler; 4th Sergeant, Smith; 1st Corporal, 
Briggs; 2d Corporal, Lowell; 3d Corporal, Curtis; 
4th Corporal, Patten. 

Company B. — Captain, Moulton; 1st Lieuten- 
ant, Emery; 2d Lieutenant, A. L. Perry; 1st Ser- 
geant, Kneeland ; 2d Sergeant, G. B. Wheeler ; 3d 
Sergeant, Goodale; 4th .Sergeant, Wells; 1st Cor- 
poral, J. J. Bradley; 2d Corporal, Larrabee; 3d 
Corporal, Simmons ; 4th Corporal, D. W. Bradley. 
J. L. CHAiiBEELAiN, President. 

Bj' invitation of Col. Walker, Co. E., Bow- 
doin Cadets, visited him at his residence in 
Topsham, on the evening of June 20th. The 
compan}^, led bj^ Capt. Gerry and accompanied 
by the College Band, left the Chapel at 7.15. 
Boots, resplendent at the start with careful 
application of " Crumbs' best," rapidly as- 
sumed the form and appearance of those 
" sluggish clods " somewhere mentioned as 
our brothers in the future. The dust raised 
b}' the feet descended in dainty clouds into 
eyes and throats, but each man maintained a 
soldierly bearing throughout; and, save the 
happy meeting with a funeral procession fi-om 
the Rue de Pai'is, the Compan}^ arrived at its 
destination without adventure. Col. Walker 
received the members of the Company in his 
elegantly arranged hall. Here were gathered 
some members of the Faculty and friends of 
Col. Walkei", the company being graced by 
the presence of a few ladies. The Cadets 
had invited no ladies, owing to the inconve- 
nience of waiting upon them over or back 
again ; (one " well-greaved," however, with 
characteristic gallantry, entered the hall with 
his rifle at a graceful " secure," and his right 
arm at a maidenly " support.'"^ Some time 
was spent in conversation and in examining 
the Colonel's fine collection of paintings, and 



58 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



then Capt. Gerry called the Company into line. 
They executed the "manual of arms" in a 
very creditable manner, but were obliged to 
omit many of the company movements, owing 
to the limited space. Music and refreshments 
followed. The fancy drill by Cadets Alden, 
Paj'son and Wells, was heartilj^ applauded. 
Col. Walker addressed the Company briefly, 
and called upon Mr. Tenney (A. G-. of the 
TelegrapK). Mr. Tenney spoke of the phys- 
ical and other advantages of a military train- 
ing, and expressed a wish that the Cadets 
might bring the flag to Brunswick on the 
Fourth of July. After cheers for Col. Wal- 
ker and Maj. Sanger, the Company started for 
home. Their progress through Main street 
Avas eagerly watched by a pair of "peelers" 
from the 3d Ward, who threatened " wristers " 
if there was any singing. 



The American Society of Social Science 
at a late meeting discussed the question of 
the co-education of the sexes which is now so 
deeply engrossing the attention of our higher 
educators. Col. T. AV. Higginson and Wen- 
dell Phillips advocated the admission of avo- 
men into our colleges. President Eliot and 
Prof. Agassiz expressed opposite views and 
earnestly advocated the establishment of 
sepai'ate colleges, solely and exclusively for 
women. We believe these are the views 
of the best educators of the country, the men 
who bring candid thought and wide experi- 
ence to the decision of the question. The 
College Coward in commenting upon this dis- 
cussion, endorses the same views. None are 
more anxious that women should receive an 
advanced education than those who believe 
she should be educated with reference to her 
nature and destiny. And yet they are 
traduced by crazy, fanatical, would-be reform- 
ers as, if they were striving to debase woman 
and shut her out of the pale of cultivated 
society. 



Silently but surel^^ England is undergoing 
a mighty revolution. Even the most casual 
student of her politics cannot fail to discern 
the crumbling of old institutions, the gradual 
laj'ing of new foundations. We were forciblj'' 
reminded of this on reading of the introduc- 
tion of a resolution into the House of Com- 
mons of the following purport : " Resolved, 
that the establishment by law of the churches 
of England and Scotland, involves a violation 
of religious equalit3r, deprives those churches 
of the right of self-government, imposes 
upon Parliament duties which it is not 
qualified to discharge, and is hurtful to the. 
religious and political interests of tlie com- 
munity, and therefore ought no longer to 
be maintained." This certainly has the 
true democratic ring ; without fear it pro- 
claims the principle of entire religious liberty, 
of which the established Church of England 
is so flagrant a violation. Mr. Miall, the in- 
defatigable leader in this movement and the 
proposer of the resolution, advocated it in a 
speech of great power. 

Gladstone, the Liberal but Conservative, 
replied in defence of the church. The 
vote stood 61 in the affirmative, 356 in the 
negative. But this was no defeat to the 
movement. The very fact that such a reso- 
lution has been fearlessly introduced and ad- 
vocated in the still aristocratic House of 
Commons, and that 61 men were found to re- 
cord their votes in its support, is in itself a 
victory. There was never yet a great revo- 
lutionary movement in any country but it suf- 
fered crushing reverses at its rise. The first 
weapon of the revolutionist is the pick-axe 
and not the powder. The latter he may never 
have to use, the former always. Bright and 
Dilke and Miall are working for victory, 
though its sun may never dawn upon their 
lives. England will yet cast off all these odi- 
ous trammels, relics of a feudal age, and thor- 
oughly redeem the conscience from the super- 
vision and jurisdiction of human law. For, 



BOfVD OIN ORIENT. 



59 



however it may be palliated, the established 
Church of England, and indeed established 
churches in any country, are violations of the 
right of conscience and the freedom of relig- 
ious belief. 

The light that is dawning upon the pres- 
ent age will speedily melt away these vestiges 
of an ancient bigotry. 



COLLEGE NEWS. 



The Record is unusually newsy. 

Our exchanges teem with accounts of base- 
ball matches, while the grass is growing around 
oar " home base." 

The Advocate publishes the measurements 
of the Harvard nine as follows : 

Average chest (inflated) 39 1-2 in. 

" upper arm H 2-9 iu. 

" lower arm 11 1-3 iu. 

Weight 162 lbs. 

Heiglit .5 ft. 11 2-3 iu. 

The Advocate contains an " Ode to the Sec- 
ond Aorist," wherin " K. Z. H." tells of an 
ingenious method of passing cribs at examina- 
tion. We publish an extract. 

Nut passed, but turned and leaned his back 

Against my [•diim-niate's desk ; 
"Wbiie I revealed a look of black 

Despair, and then addressed 
Myself to let cbum know I wanted 

A copy of bis prose. 
And be, good fellovr, quite undaunted, 

Before the other knows 
"What he's about, writes ou a scrap 

Of paper, wliich be pins 
"With studious care to the proctor's flap. 

And then uiy part begins. 
My fingers loudly snapped, to call 

The Argus to my side. 
He slowly walks the ancient ball 

"With all a proctor's pride, — 
His form erect ; nor does he fail 

To show a visage bold, 
Nor thinks — the dupe — of what a tale 

His tail might then unfold. 
I ask, what time there yet remains. 

He turns to view the clock. 
My itching fingers take with pains 

The paper from his frock. 



"Cutting" sarcasm. "I desire to be ex- 
cused, etc., oa account of a severe headache." 
—Tablet. 



TIME TABLE. 
Trains leave Brunswick for — 

Augusta — 8.30 A.M. ; 2.3.5 aud 7,00 p.m. ; 1.50 

A.M. (Pull.) 
Bangor — 2.35 p.m. ; 1.50 a.m. (Pull.) 
Bath — 7.40 aud 8.30 a.m. ; 2.30, 5.10 aud 7.00 

P.M. 

Boston — 7.38 a.m.; 2.05 and 5.00 p.m.; 12 M. 

(Pull.) 
Farmiugton — 2.30 p.m. 
Lewistou — 7.40 a.m. ; 2.30 and 7.00 p.m. 
Portland- 7.33 A.M. ; 2.05 and 5.00 p.m. ; 12 m. 

(Pull.) 
Waterville — 2.35 P.M.; 1.50 a.m. (Pull.) 



BUSINESS CARDS. 

S TROUT & HOLMES, 
COU.SSELORS AT LAW, 

No. 88 Middle Street (Canal Bank Building), PORTLAND, ME. 

A. A. STRODT. GEO. F. HOLMES ('66). 

JOSEPH A. LOCKE (Bowdoin, '65), Attorney and Counsellor at Law, 
74 Middle Street, eor. Exchange Street, PORTLAND. 



JOSIAH H. DRUMMOND (Colby, '46) Counsellor at Law, 100 Exchange 
street, PORTLAND. 

NOYES, HOLMES & COMPANY, 

219 Wuahington St. and 10 Bfomfiehl St., 
BOSTON, MASS. 

PUBLISHEES AND BOOKSELLEES, 



AND WHOLESALE . 



STATIONERS, 

All kinds of COLLEGE AND SCHOOL TEXT BOOICS, .and STANDARD 
AND MISCELLANEOUS LITERATURE, supplied at 

LOW PRICES. 

Orders by Mail or Express will receive prompt .and careful attention. 
These books may be obtained through J. P. BICKFORD, Agent, No. 21 
Maine Hall. 



DIVINITY SCHOOL OFHAEVAED UNIVEESITY 

This School is open to persons of all denominations. Pecuniary aid is 
afforded to those who are needy and deserving. 
The next academic year will begin 

SEPTEMBER 26th. 

Further information will be given on application to 

Prof. OLIVER STEARNS, D.D., 
Or Prof. E. J. TOTING, 

Cambridge, Mass. 



60 



BOlVDOm ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Classical Department. 

TERMS OF ADMISSION. 

Candidates for admission into the Freshman Class are examined as fol- 
0W8 : — 

Harkness's Latin Grammar, including Prosody) Parts I. and II. Hark- 
ness's Introduction to Latio Prose Composition; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the ^aeid; Cicero's Select Orations; Sallust. 

Hadley's or Goodwin's Greek Grammar; Goodwin's Greek R3ader; or 
Xenophon's Anabasis, 4 books, and Homer's Iliad, 2 books. 

Arithmetic; Algebra, to equations of the second degree; Davies's 
Legendre's Geometry, first and third books. 

Euglish Grammar; Ancient and Modern Geography. 



Scientific Departmnt. 



TEEMS OF ADMISSION. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the following subjects : — 
Mafftema^ics— Arithmetic, includmg Common and Decimal Frac- 
tions, Interest, and Square Root; Algebra, to Equations of the 
Second Degree; Geometry, Books I. and HI. of Davies's Le- 
gendre. 
Geography — Political Geography, and simple elements of Astrono- 
mical and Physical Geography. 
HistoTy — Leading facts in general History, and especially in Ameri- 
can History. 
Latin — Allen's Latin Grammar, or the equivalent. 
English— The examination will consist in 1st, Reading aloud a pas- 
sage from some standard author, with explanations of gram- 
matical construction, and definition and derivation of words; 2d, 
Writing a few sentences in English, on some familiar subject, 
reference being had to spelling and punctuation as well as to 
composition; 3d Correction^ of ungrammatical sentences com- 
posed for the purpose. 
All candidates for admission must produce certificates of their good 
moral character. 

The time for admission is the Friday after Commencement, and the 
first Thursday of tbe first term. In exceptional cases applicants may be 
examined at other times. 



CouRss OF Study. 

The regular course of Instruction is that commended by the leading 
colleges of the country as eminently adapted_to secure liberal culture. 

THE SCIENTIFIC COURSE 

has been recently organized. Thirty-four students have already entered,— 
a fact which indicates that the College has been successful in its effort to 
meet the demand for a liberal course of study which, shall at the same 
time look towards the actual uses and applications of knowledge. 

The studies pursued in this course are comprised in the following: — 
Languages — English one year, and optional two ; Latin one year, 
optional three ; French one year, optional three ; German one 
year, optional two ; Spanish, Italian, Swedish, Anglo-Saxon, one 
year. 
MatheTnatics — Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, Slensuration, 
Spherical Trigonometry, Analytical Geometry ; Differential and 
Integral Calculus, with the application of these to Surveying, 
Navigation, Projections, Dialling, Levelling, Astronomy, Mechan- 
ics, Topographical and Hydrographical Engineering. 
Natural History — Geology, Mineralogy, Botany, Zoology, with their 
relatioBS to the tndu trial Arts. 



Natural Philosophy — Mechanics, Hydrodynamics, Pneumatics, 
Optics, Astronomy, Light, Heat, Electricity, &c. 

Chemistry — In all its branches and applications. 

History and Political Science — General, Medieval and Modern His- 
tory, Political Economy, General Principles of Law, Interna- 
tional Liw, L:iw of Evidence, Constitution of United States, 
Theory of Government, American Law. 

Philosophy — Rhetoric, L^gic, Psychology, Metaphysics, Evidences 
of Natural and Revealed Religion, Ethics, Esthetics. 

The studies of the first two years ara common throughout the Depart- 
ment and are intended to lay a broad and substantial foundation for all 
branches of subsequent study. In the last two years the studies are 
arranged in distinct courses, in accordance with certain leading objects : a 
general scientific culture, or special technical skill. Attention is particu- 
larly invited to the facilities offered for the thorough study of Civil Engi- 
neering. 



A POST-GRADUATE COURSE 



of two years is also commenced, i 
the following schools : — 



which Instruction will be given : 



I. Letters — Comprising Languages, Ancient and Modern (includ- 
ing the Oriental) with theii- literatures ; Philology ; Rhetoric; 
LDgic ; History ; Elocution ; the Fine Arts. This leads to the 
degree of Master of Arts. 

n. Science — Advanced Mathematics, Physics, Natural History and 
Chemistry, in their uses and applications. This leads to the 
degi'ee of Doctor of Science. 



m. Philosophy — Comprising the above, considered in their i 

and relations ; Psychology, Metaphysics, Ethics, Esthetics ; Poli- 
tics ; Theory of Government, Constitutional History, Principles 
of Law, International Law. Leading to the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy. 

rv. Medicine — The Medical School of Maine. Degree, — M. D, 

Students who are not graduates will be received on satisfactory evi- 
dence of proficiency in study which will enable them to profit by this 
Course. 

Much and careful attention is given to Physical Culture under the train- 
ing of accomplished Instructors. The Gymnasium is well provided with 
approved apparatus, and the opportunities for Military drill and discipline 
are of the very best. 

It is but just to say that good morals and manliness are distinguishing 
features of college life at Bowdoin. 

The Library of Bowdoin is one of rare value, and the choicest works 
are constantly added. The Gallery of Paintings is well known to be one of 
the most remarkable in the country. The Cabinet and apparatus are 
ample for their purpose. 

The annual ex-penses are, for tuition, &c., $90. Board $2.50 and $4.00 
a week. Pecuniary assistance, from the income of thirty scholarships and 
various other benefactions, is rendered to those who are unable fully to 
meet their expenses otherwise. 

Commencement July 10th. Examination for admission July 12th and 
Aug. 2Sth, at 9 a.m. 

First term begins Aug. 28th, at evening. 

Every encouragement will be given to persons who desire to pursue 
any study taught in the College. 

The town of Brunswick, situated on tide water— the Androscoggin River 
on one side and the Ocean on the other ; already a seat of various manu- 
factures and destined to become one of the principal railroad centres of the 
State, easy also of access from all quarters,— presents an excellent locality 
for scientific as well as literary pursuits, while the facilities afforded by 
Bowdoin College, its Libraries, Galleries of Art, Cabinets, Scientific Col- 
lections, Laboratories, and Apparatus, offer great inducements to the ear- 
nest student of the Useful and Liberal Arts 



Vol. III. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JULY 9, 1873. 



No. 6. 



TRUE STORY OF HELICON COLLEGE. 

I. — Jove calls for ax EvE-opEXEre. 
II. — And uis Eyes are thereby opened. 
III. — Co-Education in Heaven. 



JOHN" HEyRr JUPITER, tho famous celestial 
Who dwelt on Olympus some centuries buck, 
Sat alouo iu his stuch', pensive and moody, 
"With brows that were clothed in au ominous black, 
And a look which if seen iu a monarch terrestJ-ial 
"Would bode nothing less than the thumb-screw or rack. 

0, what is the cause of King Jupiter's ire ? 

"What command disobeyed or what thwarted desire 

Has raked up his dudgeon aud set it on fire ? 

He has taken of late to reading and mooning 

O'er folios thick with preposterous lore ; 

Cous Buckle at breakfast, Victor Hugo at nooning, 

Lights his afternoon pipe with a chapter or more 

Of Jeremy Taylor, takes Hegel at supper; 

Leads off iu the Gorman at heavenly parties. 

His pants-pockets pregnant with Kant and Descartes, 

And at bedtime finds sleep in a volume of Tupper. 

Our history tells iu a chapter or two 

"Why a God so well read should be looking so blue. 

This classical personage, clever and wise 

And for sound eruditicm so .justlj' respected. 

Discovered erelong to his utter surprise 

That sohool-books on high had been sadly neglected. 

In something this wise 
The incident happened which opened his eyes : — 

One morning awaking a particle seed,7. 

He pulled at the bell-rope and brought Ganymede. 

" Ho ! varlet," i-oared out the divine cloud-compeller, 

'• Go straiglitway to Bacchus, get the key of the cellar — 

Third shelf on tho left — old bottle of rye — 

Hot whisk.y-punch — steaming and strong — 

Mind you don't drink any, coming along. 

'So. I won't risk it. Can't trust yer, by thunder ! 

Bring up the bottle and lemons, and I 

"Will mix it myself, for I'm demnebly dry. 

Bottle is labelled. Dens vult, and don't blunder." 



""Well, you're back again, are yer? It might have been 

sooner, 
But I'm glad you got in -without waking up Jnuer. 
Approach with the iye and t'other ingredients — 
How! idiot, blockhead, is this yer obedience ? 
You're as stupid as Hebe was with your rascally tricks. 
"What is that bottle you've put on the table ? 
' Old Bourbon. — Kentucky. — Corn. — Forty-sLsr,' " 
Aud his majesty pointed with infinite scorn 
To the legend imprinted so plain ou the label, 
"While the menial whimpered and acknowledged the corn ; 

But stammered, indeed 

That to write or to read 
Prom bis infancy up he had never been able. 

II. 

J. Jove had scarcely had time to recover his 
Usual placidity, 

"When his wrath was rekindled by certain discoveries 
Of disgraceful stupidity 

And deplorable ignorance prevailing in heaven 

To au extent he hardly could realize, even. 

In the first place ho learned with inefi'able shame 

That his royal spouse, Juno, C(uildu't write her own name ; 

And a billet to Mars, by Yenus indited, 
Spoiled love with a u and minus the r. 
Initialled the Venus with a diminutive c, 

Aud in grammar as bad as the spelling, invited 

The warrior whoso hart she knowed was her own 

To meat her bj' moonlight, that evening, aloau. 

Ifeptuue, although in navigation proficient. 
As a salt-water deity would naturally be, 

In mental philosophy was sadly deficient, 
And in morals and ethics wholl.y at sea. 

Mercury, catechized, gravely related 
How "Washington his birthright for pottage did barter ; 

And questioned still further, with confidence stated 
That Judas Isoariot was the first Christian martyr. 

That Sir Humphre.v Davy invented veal-pie 

And Benedict Arnold couldn't tell a lie. 

Barring Apollo and the blue-stocking Muses, 

And Minerva excepted. 
The culture aud learning which studj' induces 

"Were wholly neglected 
By the deities subject to Jupiter's swaj". 
Ashamed of this darkness, aud resolved to disperse it, he 
Decides to establish a divine university 

"Without further dela.v. 



62 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



" On Helicon's summit," quoth Jore, "it shall be — 


Was but a trifle light as air. 


J. Jupiter, Praises, A.M. ; S.T.D." 


And quite unworthy of compare 




To the evils of Co-education. 


"What he wanted to do he most generally did. 


How much of study, think you, where 


And ere Phosbns twice flopped this potentate bid 


The lads were young, and the lasses fair ? 


All gods and all goddesses lacking in knowledge 


A pretty chance of getting wisdom 


To compulsory attendance at Helicon College, 


For these sad deities above, 


A joint stock institution, irrespective of sex. 


When the only classic work which pleased 'em. 


And jovial Jupiter, he was the Prex. 


Was Ovid's naughty Art of Love ! 


Now ye ladies who blush had best feel for your cambrics. 


Exempli gratia. — Cue night 


While we finish the story in measured iambics. 


The Thunderer, who late had sallied 


The introduction is tedious and possibly stale, 


Forth for a walk in the moony light, 


And the piece as a whole, 


Met Pallas, looking very pallid ; 


Like the festive tad-pole. 


A sandal slouched on either heel. 


Has too much of a head for so little a tale. 


And every garment dcsliahille. 




Inquired the president with fervor. 


III. 


" Why thus so slipshod. Prof. Minerva ? " 


She scarce could gasp, " heavenly father, 


Awhile affairs at Helicon 


T enus— Hercules — together ! " 


"Went smoothly and serenely on. 


Then pointed with a meaning look 


The student gods and goddesses. 


Down to the grove beside the brook. 


In tunics or in boddices — 


Thither they hastened ; there espied 


Cut rather scantily, no doubt. 


The couple seated side by side. 


And much like those we read about 


Minerva's spectacles proved true. 


In Iliads and Odyssies — 


For there on the grass 


Came daily up the chapel stairs 


Sat the Cyprian lass 


When Jove had thundered thrice for prayers ; 


(The foot of her class 


To every recitation went. 


And in such things an old offender), 


On self-improvement quite intent. 


While the brawny stroke of the Helicon crew. 


But soon this zeal for education 


With strength of an ox and the brains of an ass. 


Gave place to insubordination. 


Spake words of wooing low and tender. 


The novelty wore off as time wore on 




And frequent growls were heard at Helicon. 


One burly arm around her waist 




Grew bolder and yet bolder ; 


An ashen bow, too ti'ghtly strung ; 


One shapely little head was placed 


A stag at bay, too fiercely pressed ; 


Upon one mighty shoulder; 


Too high a note, too loudly sung, 


One silky-soften hand at rest 


Will soon or late — you know the rest. 


In one as tough as leather ; 


Six moons had passed o'er Helicon 


Four lips that now and then were pressed 


And study's charm was wholly gone. 


Eight williugly together. 


In bookish lore uninterested. 


We won't describe the situation. 


The deities were turning 


But fancy Jupiter's vexation ! 


Away from learning 




To all the mischief De'il suggested. 


Ah! didn't Prmses gnash his molars 


Gods who hated mathematics 


And thunder through his godlike nose ? 


Pound holy pleasure in aquatics. 


Didst thou, Minerva, rate thy scholars 


Sot Silenus, beery classic, 


With words that cut like birchen blows, 


Sought vinous culture in old Massio. 


Old lady of cerulean hose ? 


With facility amazing 


■ While Hercules took his dose supinely. 


Aurora took to early hazing. 


And little Venus blushed divinely. 


Lieutenant Mars, the fiery hero 




Famous for his martial looks. 


" Highty-tighty ! Aphrodite," 


Eanked almost nothing on the books, 


Were the words of J. Almighty, 


While Mercury went down to zero. 


" Ton know you ought to be in bed 




Like Ceres and Diana, 


But all this care, did Jove declare, 


And yet you wander off instead 


This laziness and dissipation, 


In this indecent manner. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



63 



Xo wonder that your cheeks are red, 

Alone ! out with a fellow 1 
How can you lay your guilty head 

On such unseemly pillow ? 
A scandal, shame and sin it is ; 
"What actions for dirinities !" 

And all poor Tenus answered was, " I find 
' A fellow feeling makes me wondrous kind.' " 

this is why Jove is so moody and thoughtful 
And pulls at his pipe with such petulant puff, 

Imhihing his beer by the generous pot-full 
For the thirstiest mortal thrico over enough. 

■'■^/'.lii-; 



[ COMMUNICATION. ] 

THE MILITARY DEPARTMENT. 

Something more than a year ago, Bowdoin 
put to the test a new and hitherto untried ex- 
periment — the experiment of mihtary in- 
struction in an American college. So far as 
those fearless men who are ever testing the 
crude ideas and vague theories of society are 
entitled to credit, whether successful or not, 
the authorities of Bowdoin deserve praise for 
this step. There was no precedent, no well- 
established rule to guide such an enterprise 
at its inauguration. No one knew what would 
be the result ; all guessed, all formed opinions, 
but the future of the "drill" to the most dis- 
cerning eye was as misty as Fate's purposes 
ever are. But now for more than a year its 
destiny has been developing. Overseers and 
Alumni, Faculty and students, the whole 
world indeed, if they chose, have had an op- 
portunity to see and understand the inward 
workings, the practical effects of the system 
that has been inaugurated. The time has come 
when the question can be discussed from the 
two standpoints of theory and fact. The 
aniversary exercises of the college are at 
hand ; the authorities and Alumni meet again 
in council ; the machinery of the institution 
is once more examined and set in motion. 
Certainly this then is the time for an honest 
and searching discussion of a question Avhich 
is most closelv connected with the vital inter- 



ests of tlie college. Most sincerely then we 
ask — is it presumptuous to say that we claim, 
that we demand? — that the system which has 
now been tried so thoroughl}^, which has thus 
assumed a new phase, should be brought once 
more to the attention of those who are re- 
sponsible for its results. And we will begin 
by acknowledging that we are opposed to the 
" drill," that we believe it to be detrimental 
to the best interests of Bowdoin and her stu- 
dents. In saj'ing this we represent the opin- 
ions of no one but ourselves, and we will be 
held responsible for notliing more. We will 
discuss the system under two divisions, its 
popularity and its inherent merits. That the 
question of popularity among those who are 
subject to its sway, is a pertinent one, all, we 
think, will admit. It is neither just nor pru- 
dent to burden men with irksome tasks unless 
their good imperatively demands it. We 
think we are warranted in asserting that on 
the whole the drill is unpopular. The situa- 
tion to our own eyes may be summed up in a 
few words. Many heartily like the "drill"; 
many are carelessly indifferent; many, very 
many, are quietly but thoroughly restless and 
dissatisfied, mau}^ are openly and bitterly re- 
bellious. 

One fact, certain!}'', we can honestly 
claim. If ever the Military Department 
could have a fair opportunity to develop its 
popularity, it had one on the organization of 
the Volunteer Company to compete for the 
champion flag. To the Junior class the pros- 
pect of the highest offices in this company, and 
the undoubted prestige they would here obtain 
in the assigmuent of offices for the coming year, 
was an especial inducement; all were incited 
(if incited they could be) by the honor of be- 
longing to the representative company of 
Bowdoin, the prospect of the culminating ju- 
bilee of the Fourth, and the glittering prize 
at the goal ; all the unpleasant features of the 
" drill " were varnished over by the gloss of 
pompous display. What was the result ? 



64 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



But forty men were wanted, and yet it was 
only with great diiSculty and after most ur- 
gent and repeated calls that this number 
could be obtained. 

And again, it is the best class of students 
with whom the drill is unpopular. We ven- 
ture to assert some of our most exemplary- 
students have received this year more marks 
than ever before, simply because of their man- 
ifest unwillingness to submit to the require- 
ments of military law. One case is notable — 
the dismissal of a student standing high as a 
scholar and a man, solely on these grounds. 
Bowdoin should be careful how she dismisses 
such students, Avhile she retains some Avho are 
so thoroughly devoted to the " drill." 

But the most unpopular feature of the 
" drill " are the military regulations, which in 
their published form imitate the severity of 
Prussian discipline. We say in their published 
form ; in reality the rules are vitterly disre- 
garded. The regulations say no i;niforms 
shall be worn save during the military exer- 
cise. Yet uniforms are worn indiscriminately 
by officers and privates in the most conspic- 
uous places. The regulations say cadets 
must salute their superior officers. Yet who 
salutes ? Not always is this mark of respect 
paid even to the Commander of the Battalion, 
to whom it certainly is due. These rules are 
either proper and should be enforced, or are 
improper and should be altogether abrogated. 

The second division of the question we 
must treat briefly. Three merits are claimed 
for the "drill"; first, it affords a vigorous 
physical exercise ; second, it imparts a knowl- 
edge of military tactics and a familiarity in 
their practice ; third, it teaches how to com- 
mand and how to obey; in other words it 
gives to the officer confidence and dignity and 
teaches cheerful obedience and long suffering 
on the part of the private. 

We admit the " drill " does afford a vigor- 
ous exercise, but when one sees the admirable 
facilities which Bowdoin possesses for all 



kinds of physical training, and her situation 
well adapted to every manlj^ sport, the folly 
of substituting for these an exercise which 
however vigorous in some aspects is positively 
injurious in others, is painfully apparent. 
The " drill " does undoubtedly afford an ac- 
quaintance with military tactics, and who 
cares if it does ? Does any student value the 
little insight he gains into militarj'' life as he 
does the time he is obliged to devote to its 
acquirement ? And how long will he retain it ? 
It will hardly last longer than the last speck 
of Brunswick sand on his boots. The last 
merit claimed for the military department 
may belong to it. Put down one white mark 
for the drill. There is alwaj's , something 
sweet in the bitterest cup. 

The greatest argument of all against the 
drill is that it is altogether out of place in a 
college devoted to the acquirement of general 
knowledge. We come here to be taught in 
science and language, and instead we are 
dosed with infantry tactics. Is'nt it" for the 
bread we desire giving us a stone ; or rather, 
perhaps, with the bread they oifer mingling 
gravel ? 

But space will allow us no more. We 
said we desired a fair discussion and we have 
tried to be fair onrselves. We do not pre- 
sume, nor would we desire to reflect at all 
upon the conduct of the Faculty. Certainly 
we Avish to attach no censure to Maj. Sanger, 
who has proved himself an able officer and a 
courteous gentleman. For ourselves we mean 
to submit to legitimate authority and at the 
same time candidly and fearlessly state our 
views. Student. 



THE POST-GRADUATE COURSE. 

For two years the catalogue has been an- 
nouncing that there was at Bowdoin, organ- 
ized and prepared to give instruction, a Post- 
Graduate Course for those who desired to dig 
deeper into the mines of Science and Philoso- 



BOWBOIN ORIENT. 



65 



phy than the}' could in the four years of col- 
lege life. 

For aught we know the catalogue only 
has had anj^thing to do or say in regard to 
this course. There may have been some ir- 
regular students occupied for the most j^art 
with some other business, and rather lending 
their names to the course than drawing any 
instruction from it. 

■We think it much the same in similar 
courses in other institutions, with the excep- 
tion perhaps of advanced courses in science, 
which are generally more successful. Schools 
of law, theology, and medicine are every- 
where crowded, but those which should give 
ns our higher educators and scholars are desert- 
ed. Such instruction, if sought at all, is sought 
in foreign lands. Only those whose ambition 
and purse are both Avell stretched can avail 
themselves of this privilege. 

There are two reasons for this ill-success 
of our post-graduate courses. One is very 
simple, the European universities offer very 
much superior facilities for this advanced in- 
struction than our own. The more potent 
reason is because our young men are so eager 
to launch into active life, and the Yankee 
genius is so fully imbued with the spirit of 
money-making that we cannot brook the long 
wearisome discipline of a thorough education. 
The first reason hinges upon the second. If 
our post-graduate institutions were well pa- 
tronized there would be no trouble about their 
merit. The fault is with ourselves, and the 
remedy also. 

All, certainly, who have been through or 
are now going through the College course, 
know how wretchedly insufficient it is to meet 
the demands of the earnest seeker for knowl- 
edge. He must indeed be egotistical who 
swallows his A.B. with much self-satisfaction. 
We do not know whether society in general 
is much awed at that majestic title, but cer- 
tainly the graduate himself ought to realize 
that he has but just committed the alphabet 



of science. He certainly knows what a per- 
fect whirl the College course is, how he is 
rushed rapidly from one branch to another, 
how a few vague theories here and a few scat- 
tering facts there are driven into his brain, 
until at length he stands upon the Commence- 
ment platform. Bachelor of Arts indeed, but 
deserving that title only if Art is to be con- 
sidered the damsel he has not won. 

But it will be useless to enlarge upon this. 
It will be acknowledged universally that the 
men who are to take the lead in literature and 
science, who are to become our statesmen and 
our scholars, need a higher education than that 
afforded by our colleges. Are we willing then 
to curl) that spirit of impetuous ambition which 
is so characteristic of the American mind, and 
begin to la}' a deep foundation before we erect 
the fragile structure ? 

The majority of our students are not old 
enough when they graduate, to begin at once 
the active duties of life. 

Two-thirds of them spend a few years in 
teaching or some other temporary employment 
before they enter upon their life work. It 
cannot be said then that we do not have time 
to accomplish this. There is no need of this 
precipitate haste on the part of our young 
men. Two j^ears of advanced study will be 
of vastly more value to one destined for pi'o- 
fessional or literary pursuits than two thousand 
dollars laid up from the proceeds of actual 
practice. 



Charles Dudley Warner, who delivers one 
of the Commencement addresses this year, is 
a graduate of Hamilton of the class of 1851, 
and has gained great popularity dui'ing the 
last three or four j^ears by his various literary 
works, such as " Saunterings," " My Summer 
in a Garden" and " Back-Log Studies." He 
was one of the Commencement orators at 
Hamilton last year and at Bowdoin the year 
before. He is the editor of the Hartford Daily 
Courant. 



66 



BOWBOm ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVERY ALTEEKATE WEDNESDAY DUK- 
TSG THE COLLEGIATE TEAR AT 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE, 
Bt the Class of 1874. 

EDITORS. 

S. V. Cole, L. H. Kimball, 

W. T. GooDALB, D. 0. S. Lowell, 

F. W. Hawthorne, F. K. Wheeler, 

H. K. White. 

Terms — $2 00 a year in advance; single copies, 
15 cents. 

Address communications to Bowdoln' Orient, 
Brunswick, Maine. 

For sale at 7 Appleton Hall, Bowdoin College. 
Also by J. GrifBn and B. G. Deunison, Brunswick ; 
and A. Williams & Co., 135 Washington St., Boston. 



CONTENTS. 
Vol. III., No. 6. — July 9, 1873. 

The True Story of Helicon College 61 

Communication 63 

The Post-Graduate Course 64 

Editorial 66 

Amorum Amor 67 

Blunders 67 

Necrology 67 

Local 68 

Carcassonne 70 

College News 70 



Although Commencement, like Thanks- 
giving, comes but once in a year, the oft-men- 
tioned wheels of Time have rolled onward so 
swiftly that it has brought another with the 
preceding one yet fresh in our memories. 

Again the campus is covered, and the halls 
are thronged with the world's people trying 
to obtain at least a vague inkling of the 
mysteries of college life. How vague this is 
our own remembrance teU. us, as we look back 
to our outside view of academical institutions. 



Again Alma Mater calls back her sons 
who lay aside the dignitj'- of bench and bar, 
and in the genial atmosphere of old-time 
recollections men become boys again. 

This is the moulting season of the college. 
The old integument, that for a year has held 
in unyielding embrace the ambitious minds of 
Wisdom's devotees, is now thrown oif, and 
each class enters on a higher life. 

Our acts are four ages. First the Fresh- 
man, intently perusing the ticket for which 
he has so long labored, and harboring the firm 
conviction that another "gem of purest ray 
serene" is rescued from its dusky cavern, 
and in a few short years will sparkle in a 
nation's diadem, and be the magic talisman 
that shall drive offensive animals from our 
" national parlor." 

Sophomores lay aside ambitious thoughts 
and assume the guardianship of the Fresh- 
man. Meantime they amuse themselves with 
tin horns, and sing songs that the Fresh- 
men would consider extremely foolish if they 
did not suspect a hidden meaning lay behind 
each word. Juniors enter upon their course 
with the somewhat trite but remarkably evi- 
dent remark that " they're half way through," 
and experience has shown that sometimes they 
are more than that. Another song that they 
joyfully sing is, " In Junior year we take our 
ease," &c., which, by the way, is an excellent 
joke, and were it not that Ave don't wish to 
undeceive them we would hint that it is a po- 
etic license. 

We would fain speak of Seniors also, but 
language fails us. The " lamp of experience " 
has not yet shone upon that pathway, and it 
is unsafe to trust to imagination. 

Of the graduating class we woidd say a 
word. Our personal relations with them have 
been of the most pleasant character through- 
out our course, and a feeling of lonesomeness 
comes over us at the thought of their depart- 
ure. This is heightened by the remembrance 
that we lose with them some of our most 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



67 



highly esteemed instructors, and that when 
we return we shall find strangers in their 
stead. But partings are unavoidable in this 
life, however- much they may be regretted ; 
and so with a sincere desire for the future 
prosperity of teachers and friends and the 
hope that we who remain shall not be wholly 
forgotten, we bid them farewell. 



AMORUM AMOR. 
Ah ! from the snow-deck'd Maythorn bough 

This sad truth ye may borrow : 
Earth's gems and joys so radiant now, 

Fast-fleeting know no morrow ; 
But there's a flower that never dies, 

Strewn o'er Alp-ridge, tarn, and glen. 
The rainbow tints its sheen outvies, 

'Tis Jehovah's love for men. 

Hast culled Life's fairest floret — Love ! 

That nepenthe when oppressed, 
That olive-branch the home-bound dove 

Brings at last as sign of rest ? 
The loved one nestling in fond arms, 

May oblivious lie, e'en then. 
It will not slake with all its charms. 

Like the Spirit's love for men. 

Ambition's lust will pass, I ween. 

As the Famed have felt of yore ; 
Proud Learning tire, how vast ye deem 

The outlook from bookish lore ; 
Wealth can raise to a sovran height ; 

Knowledge sway with tongue and pen ; 
The love of loves when all grows night 

Is the Lamb's deep love fur men. 

L'ENVor. 
Thus from fair Spring's snow-perfamed bloom 

This forecast ye maj^ borrow : 
All joys of Earth, Earth will entomb, 

Each joy enfolds its sorrow. 



N'OEL.''' 



Among all the strange blunders Avhicli 
men have perpetrated, the records of art pre- 
sent some of the most ridiculous and incred- 
ible. 

Tintoret, an Italian painter, in depicting 
the children of Israel gathering manna, cau- 
tiously arms them with muskets for defense in 
case of attack. 



Cigoli painted the aged Simeon at the cir- 
cumcision of the Saviour, and deceived by a 
modern custom, decked his venerable nose 
with a pair of spectacles. 

Even Albert Durer trims the white robes 
of an angel in the garden of Eden, with the 
heavj'- flounces of modern fashion. 

A stupid Dutch artist in painting the sac- 
rifice of Isaac, represents Abraham, instead of 
using the sacrificial knife, pointing a blunder- 
buss at the head of the trembling boy. 

A French painter ornaments the table at 
the last supper of our Lord with his disciples, 
with tumblers filled with cigar lighters. 

To crown the list, the garden of Eden has 
been painted with Adam and Eve in all their 
primeval simplicity, while near them in full 
costume, is seen a hunter tvith a gun, shooting 
duclcs. 



NECROLOGY OF BOWDOIX COLLEaE, 187.3. 

1821. — John Payne Cleaveland; h. Byfleld, 
Mass., July 19, 1798 ; (1. Newburyport, Mass., March 
7, 1873, ffit. 75. 

1822.— Joseph Hale Abbott; b. Wilton, N. H., 
Sept. 2G, 1802; d. Cambridge, Mass., April 7, 1873, 
iEt. 71. 

1826.— Robert Southgate ; b. Portland, Jan., 
1808; d. Woodstock, Vt., Feb. 6, 1873, ajt. 65. 

1827.— Ichabod Goodwin Jordan; b. Saco, Oct. 
6, 1806; d. Berwick, Feb. 21, 1873, a3t. 66. 

1827. — George Farrar iloulton; b. Biicksport, 
Sept. 25, 1806 ; d. Philadelphia, Nov. 20, 1872, set. 
66. 

1833. — John Slemons Lunt; b. Portland, Sept. 
5, 1815 ; d. Deering, 1870, ajt. 55. 

1837. — Andrew Dunning; b. Brunswick, July 
11, 1815; d. Thompson, Conn., March 26, 1872, 
ait. 57. 

1838.— Dean Andrews; b. Lovell, Feb. 1.5, 1808; 
d. Marshall, 111., Sept. 14, 1872, at. 64. 

1844. — Henry Padelford Deane; b. Ellsworth, 
Oct. 9, 1823; d. Boston, March 26, 1873, ast. 49. 

1844. — William Henry Farnham; b. Bangor, 
March 24, 1824; d. Selma, Ala., July 27, 1872, 
set. 48. 

1844.— Edmund Webster Flagg; b. Bangor, 
Jitne 29, 1824 ; d. Bangor, Jan. 16, 1873, fet. 49. 



68 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



1851. — Dauiel Lewis Eaton; b. Calais, Oct. 31, 
1825 ; d. Washington, D. C, Feb. 23, 1873, ajt. 47. 

1859. — Howard Malcom Eaudlett ; b. Stratham, 
N. H., Feb. 20, 1837 ; d. Philadelpliia, May, 1873, 
set. 36. 

1861. — Albion Howe ; b. Jacksonville, Fla., May 
16, 1840 ; killed by tbe Modocs, April 26, 187'3, 
set. 32. 

1863. — George Edgar Brown; b. Hampden, 
Nov. 1, 1841 ; d. Washington, D. C, April 29, 1873, 
ffit. 33. 

1869.— John Colby Cotton; b. Wolfboro, N. H., 
April 29, 1844 ; d. Ossipee, N. H., Dec. 24, 1872, 
iBt. 29. 

NOT BEFORE EEPOETED. 

1838. — Elbridge Gerry Bassett ; b. Atkinson, N. 
H., Aug. 21, 1814, d. 1850, a3t. 36. 

1838. — Benjamin Francis Mitchell; b. N. Tar- 
mouth, Aug. 12, 1816; d. Memphis, Tenn., July 
1865, EBt 49. 



CLASS ODE. 

BT C. II. WALKER. 

Dear brothers, united in heartfelt devotion, 

To old Alma Mater our last song we raise ; 
Our hearts swell within us with grateful emotion 

As we linger to give her our tributes of praise. 
She has guided our footsteps in life's golden morning, 

She has made our hearts bolder to battle for right; 
TCe will cherish her pi-ecepts, we'll heed every warning, 

And cheered by her mem'ries go forth to the fight. 

We shall go not united, but scattered and broken 

The band which first gathered at our college shrine ; 
But we've laid on that altar our friendship's pure token. 

And the flame of our love ever brightly will shine. 
May its light like a beacon gleam far o'er life's ocean, 

That every lone voyager its clear rays maj^ see, 
Then each brother will cherish with fonder devotion 

The ties that once bound hira to old sevehtt-three. 

Though dear Alma Mater above us is bending, 

A deep shade of sorrow steals over each heart, 
And grief with our pleasure is now sadly blending. 

For soon, ay, too soon, dear classmates, we part. 
Farewells must be spoken, old friends now must sever. 

But we'll still be united in friendship and love; 
May our Father now guide us and watch o'er us ever, 

Till an unbroken band we are gathered above. 



" The Six " will leave for Springfield on 
Commencement Day. 



LOCAL. 



Lemons. 

Virtue in detail. 

Examinations are over. 

Co. E has stacked arms. 

Does your dress coat fit ? 

'76 has appeared in white hats. 

The genial June-bug is no more. 

'73's Class Day invitations are unique. 

Tickets for the concert at Griffin's (Chas.). 

Ex-President Harris will deliver the Bac- 
calaureate. 

We forbear to quote Ward Beecher on 
the warm weather. 

A " dance on the green " is being talked 
up among the liberallies. 

Sodom celebrated the Fourth hj a display 
of fireworks in the evening. 

The Assistant Treasurer's office is being 
renovated for Commencement. 

There are no rooms left for the coming 
Freshmen. '77 is literally " upon the town." 

We suggest that the Visiting Committee 
report on those promoters of health planted 
around the halls. 

Two Sophomores came near drowning 
while in bathing the other day. They report 
the sensations as delightful. One, in his fan- 
cied nearness to the judgment, confessed the 
theft of various articles which he "never took 
at all." 

The Sophomore Prize Declamation was 
very entertaining. There was not a poor 
speaker among the contestants, and the whole 
exhibition was far above the usual standard. 
The" Committee awarded the first prize to 
Hill and Virgin, and the second to Standish 



BOWJJOIN ORIENT. 



69 



and Simmons. Th^re were others whom the 
committee undoubtedly deemed worthy of 
Ijrizes, but were unable to grant them ; among 
these, Upton, in his admirable rendering of 
the " Dream of Eugene Aram," is especially 
worthy of note. 

Class Supper, '76. — The Freshman sup- 
per came off at the Sagadahoc House, Bath, 
on the evening of July 2d. The class left 
on the 6.30 train, each man proudly swing- 
ing his new cane, and now and then nervously 
feeling in his vest pocket to assure himself of 
the safety of the long-coveted Sophomore 
ticket. The exercises at the supper were 
of the usual nature, and the supper itself — 
well, 'twas the work of Maybury, and needs 
no further comment. The oration, poem, 
history and prophecy all called forth hearty 
applause from the class. 

The following toasts were drunk and res- 
ponded to : " The class of '76 " by C. 
Sargent; " Our absent President," by O. C. 
Stevens ; " The Outcast of Poker Flat," by 
C. W. Whitcomb; and "Alma Mater," by 
A. Alden. After these " everybody drank to 
everybody else," and pledged eternal devotion 
to '76. After singing, and cheers for the 
hotel and anything else wliich happened to 
be suggested, the class returned to Bruns- 
wick in teams, and incurred the wasting curse 
of the college six for disturbing their visions 
of champion flags. 



BURIAL OF ANNA LYTICS. 



" Mathematicse exsequite a classe Juniore," 
were celebrated on the evening of July 1st. 
We regret that our limited space forbids a full 
account of the ceremonies. The night was 
dark and gloomy, and the weird costumes and 
flickering lanterns contributed to the horror 
of the scene. The grave-diggers maintained 
the proverbial mirth of their occupation, and 



all the parts were well played. We give be- 
low the order of the procession, and the dirge 
as chanted by the class : — 

Brunswick Brass Band. 

Marshal. 

Aids. 

Committee of Arrangements. 

Choir. 

Grave Diggers. 

Ponies. 

Bosses. 



Pall Bearer. 
Pall Bearer. 



Pall Bearer. 



Sal 



Pall Bearer. 
Pall Bearer. 



Pall Bearer. 



Chief Mourner. 

Priest. 

The Special Mourners of the Day. 

The Calculus Division of the Class. 

Best of the Class. 



BuKiAL Service. 

" Omnes magno circum clamore fremebant 

Priucipue pius iEucas 

Ossaquc lecta cado texit CoTynKUS aheno." 

Dirgo by the Band. 

COKCREilATIO AXXA LXCTICORUM. 
Lurid red , the torch's ray 
Gleams across cur mittnight way, 
As with songs and dirges sad 
Mourn we "Anna Lyctics" dead. 

Hushed is now the busy world 
And the day's bright banner furled; 
Weeping Juniors, draw near ! 
See our " Anna" on her bier. 

When the greedy flame shall eat 
CofBn, pall and winding sheet, 
Still we'll chant our solemn lays, 
Mindful of her pristme days. 

Through many a weary night 
She's disturbed our slumbers light, 
Yet we'll sing, right mournfully, 
" Requiescat in pace." 



COMMENCEMENT WEEK. 

WEDNESDAY. 
©omincncciiicitt 35a»j. 

The House will be open for Ladies at 10 a.m., of which 
notice will be fjiven by the bell. Admission to the 
Transepts by tickets at 9.30 a.m. The E.xercises will 
commence at 10.30 o'clock, and proceed according to 
the printed Order. The Procession will form at the 
Chapel, and move at 10.15 a.m. President's Reception, 
8 P.M. 

THVBSDAT. 

The Phi Beta Kappa Fraternity will hold their An- 
imal Meeting at the Medical Lecture Koora, Adams 
Hall, at 8 o'clock a.m. 

The Annual Meeting of the Maine Historical 
Society will be held at their Library Room at 8 
o'clock a.m. 



70 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



The Cleavbland Museum: of Natural Histokt 
Tvill be opened with appropriate exercises at 10 a.m. 
Addresses by N"eheraia!i Cleaveland, ll.d., aud others. 

exercises of ®Ia§g Sat». 

The Public Exercises will commence with an Oration 
and PoEii at the Congregational Church, at H o'clock 
P.M., and be continued under the Old Oak Tree, by the 
Class Chronicles, Prophecy, Parting Address, and other 
ceremonies. Seats around the Tree will be reserved for 
those who present tickets from the Graduating Class, 
after the Exercises in the Church are concluded. 
Note. — The Public Rooms will be opened on Thurs- 
day from EIGHT to TEN o'clock A.M. 

FRIDAY. 

Examination of Candidates for admission to the several 
classes, at 9 A.M., in the Medical Lecture Boom, Adams 
Hall. 



CARCASSONNE. 

How old I am! I'm eighty years! 
I've worked both hai'd and long. 
Yet patient as mj life has been. 
One dearest sight I have not seen — 
It almost seems a wrong; 
A dream I had when life was new. 
Alas, our dreams ! they come not true : 
I thought to see fair Carcassonne, 
That lovely city — Carcassonne ! 

One sees it dimly from the height 
Beyond the mountains blue, 
Pain would I walk five weary leagues — 
I do not mind the road's fatigues — 
Through morn and evening's dew. 
But bitter frosts would fall at night, 
And on the grapes — that yellow blight! 
I could not go to Carcassonne, 
I never went to Carcassonne. 

They say it is as gay all times 

As holidays at home ! 

The gentles ride in gay attire, 

Aud in the sun each gilded spire 

Shoots up like those of Rome ! 

The Bishop the procession leads. 

The generals curb their prancing steeds. 

Alas! I kuow not Carcassonne, 

Alas ! I saw not Carcassonne ! 

Our Ticai-'s right! he preaches loud, 
And bids us to beware; 
He says, " ! guard the weakest part. 
And most the traitor in the heart 
Against Ambition's snare ! " 
Perhaps in autumn I can find 
Two sunny days with gentle wind, 
I then could go to Carcassonne, 
I still could go to Carcassonne. 



My God and Father ! pardon me 

If this, my wish, offends! 

Oue sees some hope, more high than he. 

In age, as in his infancy. 

To which his heart ascends! 

My wife, my son have seen Narbonne, 

My grandson went to Perpignan ; 

But I have not seen Carcassonne, 

But I have not seen Carcassonne. 

Thus sighed a peasant bent with age, 
Half-dreaming in his chair ; 
I said, " My friend, come go with me. 
To-morrow, then, thine eye shall see 
Those streets that seem so fair." 
That night there came for passing soul 
The church bell's low and solemn toll. 
He never saw gay Carcassonne. 
"Who has not known a Carcassonne ? 

— Selected. 



COLLHaE NEWS. 



Cornell is to have a chapel. 

Dartmouth graduates seventy-one men this 
year. 

A Freshman was heard to inquire the 
other day where he could obtain a pair of 
pants with those new sliding seats that there 
was so much talk about. He was referred to 
the sporting editor for information. — Era. 

Psi Upsilon Convention. — We cut the 
following from the Anvil of June 5th : " The 
Fortieth Annual Convention of the Psi Upsi- 
lon Fraternity, which has just been held with 
the Zeta Chapter of Dartmouth College, was 
in every particular a most successful and en- 
joyable affair. The delegates began to arrive 
on Tuesday, the 3d inst., and before the first 
business meeting, on Wednesday afternoon, 
all of the fifteen chapters were represented, 
with one or two exceptions. At three o'clock 
in the afternoon the Convention was called 
to order by its efficient President, Daniel G. 
Thompson, Esq., of New York. By the 
closest application the business of the Con- 
vention was accomplished in two sessions of 
several hours each. In regard to the found- 
ing of new chapters the Fraternity maintained 
the ground it had formerly taken, in opposi- 
tion to extending its limits, though petitions 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



71 



from prominent Universities have frequently 
been received. On Wednesday evening, by 
the kindness of Professor and Mrs. Sanborn, 
the gentlemen of the Convention attended a 
reception at their house, where they met Mr. 
and Mrs. Jas. T. Fields and several of the 
Hanover ladies. After this the assembly ad- 
journed to the Psi U. Hall, where a few hours 
were agreeably spent in a reception given by 
the Zeta Chapter. On Thursday afternoon, 
after a convenient shower had thoroughly 
laid the dust, the Convention started for the 
Shaker Community at Enfield, where Sister 
Mary and Brother Hiram were awaiting them 
with all the serenity and immaculate neatness 
for which our Shaker neighbors are proverbial. 
The Shaker collation which, to sa}^ the least, 
was a novelty to many, was served in a grove 
near the village, and though it was interrupted 
by a shower, the ardor of the delegates did 
not seem to be at all dampened. About nine 
o'clock the convention reached the Junction 
House, where an excellent supper had been 
provided, in Mr. Barron's best style. Nearly 
sixty sat down to the table, of whom about 
twenty were delegates from the various chap- 
ters. Professor Henry E. Parker of the Zeta 
Chapter officiated in his usual happy way as 
toastmaster, and Rev. Mr. Barnes of the 
Gamma Chapter as Chaplain. Among the 
toasts which were responded to, Mr. Thomp- 
son, the President of the Convention, spoke 
for Psi U., Mr. Fred A. Brown of New York 
for the Executive Council of Psi U., and Rev. 
Mr. Barnes for the Psi U. clergy. Among 
the songs, which were received with great ap- 
plause, was an ode written for the Convention 
by John Ordronaux, ll.d., of the Zeta Chap- 
ter. Several communications were read from 
distinguished alumni of the Frat.ernitj^, among 
others from Amos T. Akerman, ex-Attorney 
General of the U. S., Andrew D. White, 
LL.D., President of Cornell University, J. G. 
Holland, Charles Dudley Warner, and Gen. 
J. R. Hawley of Conn. About one o'clock 
this morning the supper was finished and all 
were called out doors to see the remarkable 
sight of a clearly defined lunar rainbow in the 
East. With this omen, of course considered 
a favorable one, and three times three cheers 
for Psi U. and the departing delegates, most 
of the members from abroad took the trains 
for their respective colleges, while the Zeta 
men turned their faces Hanoverward." 



TIME TABLE. 

Trains leave Brunswick for — 

Augusta — 8.30 A.ir.; 2.35 and 7,00 p.ir. ; 1.50 

A.iT. (Pull.) 

Bangor — 2.35 p.m. ; 1.50 a.m. (Pull.) 

Bath — 7.40 and 8.30 a.m. ; 2.30, 5.10 and 7.00 

P.M. 

Boston — 7.38 a.m.; 2.05 and 5.00 p.m.; 12 m. 

(Pull.) 
rarmington — 2.30 p.m. 
Lewiston — 7.40 a.m. ; 2.30 and 7.00 p.m. 
Portland — 7.38 a.m. ; 2.05 and 5.00 p.m. ; 12 m. 

(Pull.) 
Waterville — 2.35 p.m. ; 1.50 a.m. (Pull.) 



BUSINESS CARDS. 

S TROUT & HOLJIES, 
COCSSELORS AT LAW, 

No. 83 Middle Street (Canal Bank Building), PORTLAND, ME. 

A. A. STBOCT. OEO. F. HOLMES ('66). 

JOSEPH A. LOCKE (Bowdoin, '65), Atlornev and Counsellor at Law, 
74 Middle Street, cor. E.\change Street, PORTLAND. 



JOSIAH n. DRUMMOND (Colby, '46) CounseUor at Law, 100 Exchange 
street, PORTLAND. 



NOYES, HOLMES I COMPANY, 

219 Washinatoii St. and 10 Bromfield St., 
BOSTON, MASS. 

PUBLISHEKS AND BOOKSELLEES, 



STATIONERS, 



AU kinds of COLLEGE AND SCHOOL TEXT BOOKS, and STANDARD 
AND MISCELLANEOrS LITERATUBE, supplied at 

LOW PRICES. 

Orders by Mail or Express will receive prompt and careful attention. 
These books may be obtained through J. P. BICKFORD, Agent, No. 21 
Maine Hall. 



DITINITY SCHOOL OPHAKVAED UNIVEESITY 

This School is open to persona of all denominations. Pecuniary aid is 
afforded to those who are needy and deserving. 
The next academic year will begin 

SEPTEMBER 26rH. 

Farther information will be given on application to 

Prof. OLIYER STEARNS, D.D., 
Or Pbof. E. J. YOITNG, 

Cambridge, Mass. 



72 



BOWBOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Classical Department. 

TERMS OF ADMISSION. 

Candidates for admission into the Freshman Class are examined as fol- 

Harkness's Latin Grammar, including Prosody; Parts I. and II. Hark- 
ness's Introduction to Latin Prose Composition; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the ^neid; Cicero's Select Orations; Sallust. 

Hadley's or Goodwin's Greek Grammar; Goodwin's Greek Reader; or 
Xenophou's Anabasis, 4 books, and Homer's Iliad, 2 books. 

Arithmetic; Algebra, to equations of the second degree; Davies's 
Legendre's Geometry, first and third books. 

English Granunar; Ancient and Modern Geography. 

Scientific Department. 

TERMS OF ADMISSION. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the following subjects : — 
Mathematics — Arithmetic, including Common and Decimal Frac- 
tions, Interest, and Square Root; Algebra, to Equations of the 
Second Degree; Geometry, Books I. and m. of Davies's Le- 
gendre. 
Geography — Political Geography, and simple elements of Astrono- 
mical and Physical Geography. 
History — Leading facts in general History, and especially in Ameri- 
can History. 
Latin — Allen's Latin Grammar, or the equivalent. 
English — The examination will consist in 1st, Reading aloud a pas- 
sage from some standard author, with explanationa of gram- 
matical construction, and definition and derivation of words; 2d, 
Writing a few sentences in English, on some familiar subject, 
reference being had £o spelling and punctuation as well as to 
composition; 3d Correction^ of ungrammatical sentences com- 
posed for the purpose. 
All candidates for admission must produce certificates of their good 
moral character. 

The time for admission is the Friday after Commencement, and the 
first Thursday of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants may be 
examined at other times. 



Courses of Study. 



The regular course of Instruction is that c 
colleges of the country as eminently adapted_to s 



mended by the leading 
tre liberal culture. 



TUB SCIENTIFIC- COURSE 

has been recently organized. Thirty-four students have already entered, — 
a fact which indicates that the College has been successful in its eff'ort to 
meet the demand for a liberal course of study which shall at the same 
time look towards the actual uses and applications of knowledge. 
The studies pursued in this course are comprised in the following: — 
Languages — English one year, and optional two ; Latin one year, 
optional three ; French one year, optional three ; German one 
year, optional two ; Spanish, Italian, Swedish, Anglo-Saxon, one 
year. 
Mathematics — Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometi-y, Mensuration, 
Spherical Trigonometry, Analytical Geometry ; Differential and 
Integral Calculus, with the application of these to Surveying, 
Navigation, Projections, Dialling, Levelling, Astronomy, Mechan- 
ics, Topographical and Hydrographical Engineering. 
Natural History — Geology, Mineralogy, Botany, Zoology, with their 
relations to the Industrial Arts. 



Natural Philosophy — Mechanics, Hydrodynamics, Pneumatics, 
Optics, Astronomy, Light, Heat, Electricity, &c. 

Chemistry — In all its branches and applications. 

History and Political Science — General, Medieval and Modern His- 
toi*y. Political Economy, General Pi'inciples of Law, Interna- 
tional Law, Law of Evidence, Constitution of United States, 
Theory of tioverument, American Law. 

Philosophy — Rhetoric, Logic, Psychology, Metaphysics, Evidences 
of Natural and Revealed Rsligion, Ethics, Esthetics. 

The studies of the first two years are common throughout the Depart- 
ment and are intended to lay a broad and substantial foundation for all 
branches of subsequent study. In the last two years the studies are 
arranged in distinct courses, in accordance with certain leading objects : a 
general scientific culture, or special technical skill. Attention is particu- 
larly invited to the facilities offered for the thorough study of Civil Engi- 
neering. 



A POST-GRADUATE COURSE 



which Insti'uction will be given : 



of two years is also commenced, i 
the following schools : — 

I. Letters — Comprising Languages, Ancient and Modern (includ- 
ing the Oriental) with their literatures; Philology; Rhetoric; 
Logic ; History ; Elocution ; the Fine Ai-ts. This leads to the 
degree of Master of Arts. 

n. Science — Advanced Mathematics, Physics, Natural History and 
Chemistry, iu their uses and appUcations. This leads to the 
degree of Doctor of Science. 

HI. Philosophy — Comprising the above, considered in their reasons 
and relations ; Psychology, Metaphysics, Ethics, Esthetics ; Poli- 
tics ; Theory of Government, Constitutional History, Principles 
of Law, International Law. Leading to the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy. 

IV. Medicine — ^The Medical School of Maine. Degree, — M. D. 

Students who are not graduates will be received on satisfactory evi- 
dence of proficiency in study which will enable them to profit by this 
Com-se. 

Much and careful attention is given to Physical Culture under the train 
ing of accorapUshed Instructors. The Gymnasium is well provided with 
approved apparatus, and the opportunities for Militaiy drill and discipline 
are of the very best. 

It is but just to say that good morals and manliness are distinguishing 
features of college life at Bowdoin. 

The Library of Bowdoin is one of rare value, and the choicest works 
are constantly added. The Gallery of Paintings is well known to be one o 
the most remarkable in the country. The Cabinet and apparatus are 
ample for then- purpose. 

The annual expenses are, for tuition, &c., $90. Board $2.50 and $4.00 
a week. Pecuniary assistance, from the income of thirty scholarships and 
various other benefactions, is rendered to those who are unable fully to 
meet their expenses otherwise. 

Commencement July 10th. - Examination for admission July 12th and 
Aug. 2Sth, at 9 a.m. , 

First term begins Aug. 28th, at evening. 

Every encom-agement will be given to peraons who desire to pursue 
any study taught in the College. 

The town of Brunswick, situated on tide water — the Androscoggin River 
on one side and the Ocean on the other ; already a seat of various manu- 
factures and destined to become one of the principal railroad centres of the 
State, easy also of access from all quarters, — presents an excellent locality 
for scientific as well as literary pursuits, while the facilities afforded by 
Bowdoin College, its Libraries, Galleries of Art, Cabinets, Scientific Col- 
lections, Laboratories, and Apparatus, offer great inducements to the ear- 
nest student of the Useful and Liberal Arts 



Vol. III. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, SEPTEMBER 17, 1873. 



No. 7. 



TO A BLANK LEAF. 

Blank Leaf, -n-hat Tvouldst tUou have luo -n-iite ? 

SpeaU, thdu hast spoken never! 
A praj'cr ? a soug ? or wonldst thou bo 

A fair white leaf forever? 

N"ay! I have a little thought, 

So little that I'll -write it, 
I'll give it to thee, speechless Leaf, 

And thon niayst love or slight it: 

'Tis said when the moon shall roll no more, 

Nor tlie star beside it blinking, 
That the mind that ever once has thought 

Will still be somewhere thinking. 

Now tliy fair form they will tear or burn, 

Or to some such thing devote it; 
And nieu will forget the thought you hold 

As well as the hand that wrote it. 

But in that far time will come to mo 

This little thought I've cherished. 
And will bring its little thought with it 

Of thee and the world that perished. 

HErNRICH. 



CLARIBEL. 

Wliore Claribcl low-Iieth.— Tennyson. 

I. 

Face of skies unblurred with stonning, 

Light of suns, in bumiug gold, 
Shot through earth's life-veins and warming 

lloart of wood and breast of wold ! 
Tender buds sweet promise giving 

Of a joy they will impart ! 
the sweeter sense of living ! 

Buds are swelling in the heart. 

Clarihel is fair to see. 



Beautiful in summer weather 

Ends have bursted into bloom ; 
Up and down the gold-decked heather 

"Winds are stirring sweet perfume. 
Softly sea is rolling yonder. 

But hi,^ heart is full of moan; 
Round the gray old rocks I wander. 

But I do not go alone, — 

Claribel is dear to me. 

III. 
Far o'er field the breeze is bringing 

Music sweet, and blithe and slow. 
Out of where the bells are swinging 

In the belfry to and fro. 
Fair is life, and fairer seeming 

x\s the days do follow by; 
And r never cease my dreaming 

Till the stars slide down the sky, — 

Claribel, I love her so! 

IV. 

Beautiful in autumn weather 

Light is purpling o'er the vino; 
Bad and bloom are gone together — 

Euns the sea as red as wine. 
■Withered Leaves, fall softly yonder. 

Softer on that low gray stone! 
There I go and sit and ponder. 

And I have to go alone. 

Ah me! my Claribel lies low! 

V. . 
Earth is dark and sky is dreary. 

And the spirit longs for rest ; 
Oh ! my e3'es are weary, weary, 

Looking down the crimson "West. 
All the night I hear the rolling 

Of the wind in reed and flag; 
Sea-swung bells afar are tolling, 

"Waves are battering at the crag. 

Claribel ! dear Claribel ! 



74 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



" En Passant," Sept., 1873. 
Dear Orient, — In time that is past we 
have had remarkable proofs of the interest we 
felt for each other, and hoping it has not 
wholly died away I take the liberty of writ- 
ing you a letter. 

It is now an important period in the fash- 
ionable season — in fact it is the period which 
puts a stop to seaside pleasures and country 
vacations. It is the season when people go 
home. Somebody has said, " The happiest 
part of going away is the getting home again." 
If the author means by " getting home" that 
particular part of it which we are now under- 
going, he must have been thinking of the 
good old times when traveling was carried on 
in a different way, or he certainly was never 
on a steamboat. Now I do not know what 
particular epithets our fathers may have used 
to compensate for their slow mode of progress, 
or what praj^ers they may have offered for 
something better than a four-footed animal to 
carry them to see their friends, nor would I 
for a world detract from the glory of popular 
steam-conveyances, but I somehow feel as if 
the miles which slip so easily from under us 
now are measured in something else than rods 
and furlongs. May we not speak of a place 
as being two sea-sicks distant, or fourteen 
headaches distant ? I, for instance, am in a 
box about seven feet square, with a hole in it 
through which two breaths of air pass in and 
out once an hour — and they are remarkably 
good judges of time too. Outside something 
is shaking the apartment in very several ways ; 
inside the scene though limited is otherwise 
rather than beautiful. The chief views are 
those of a couple of berths, made, I suppose, 
for getting into, each berth containing a dear 
little mattra.se.-jnd a pillow of two small 
feathers ; underneath is also a spring, which 
a person of observation would find related to 
the coast rocks we are passing. In rhetoric 
the resemblance and illustration would be con- 
sidered happy. The next object of interest 



is a carpet-bag, which seems quite contented 
when left to itself. Over the carpet-bag an 
overcoat clings with commendable energy to 
a stout nail. Just beside the overcoat is a 
mirror that contains one of the most forlorn- 
looking pictures I think I ever saw. I do not 
like to look at it. In a corner of the room 
lies a pair of abandoned boots, and their trials 
have been worse than mine. I took great 
pains to have them "shined" just before the 
rain storm yesterday, and now the snow-white 
coverlet in the berth has taken all the black- 
ing off of them ! I thought at first I could 
collect damages of the steamboat company, 
but a friend who came in to see me (to be 
exact he could get only half way in), pointed 
out a notice posted up under the breathing- 
hole, " Passengers are particularly requested 
not to get into a berth with boots or shoes 
on." I felt very sorry, but think the over- 
sight saved my life. If I had seen the notice 
before, I should probably have taken off my 
boots and left my feet to freeze, being iii close 
proximity to the opening where the two cold 
breaths of air passed in and out. 

Taking all things into consideration I 
think I could pity a " bug in a bottle," for I 
do have one circumstance in my favor — a 
bouquet of flowers that fill the room with 
their fragrance. As I lie looking at them, 
striving to get all the sun they can, my eyes 
also are directed through the petit window, 
and I see the lace-like clouds across the blue 
sky. Let us go out of this stifling place, it is 
already noon and the storm of j'esterday has 
passed. Even a sick person can find strength 
in the scenery without. 

The coast of Maine ! I have heard of Ital- 
ian skies and Grecian shores, and believe them 
worthy their reputation; but one who sees the 
coast of Maine in a perfect day will not soon 
forget the wild, irregular line that meets the 
water, now darkening inland in the curve of 
some beautiful bay, now coming out white as 
chalk about the foot of some out-stretching 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



U 



headland. For the whole two hundred and 
fifty miles the scene presents great beauty and 
variety. Now we pass through a cluster of 
little islands lying in the quiet sea, like — well, 
like emeralds, — I believe that is the word they 
always use. Now and then we pass some isola- 
ted pieces of land that do not look at all like 
emeralds. Tiiey wear very much the appear- 
ance of baked clay — baked jiretty hard, and 
thrown from the oven immediateh^ into the 
water. Perhaps we might call them undevel- 
oped opals, or some other good name that will 
not hurt feelings. 

A barren rock standing far out in the 
waves all alone is rather interesting in its 
Avay. It looks so solid and solemn, and by its 
loneliness not only reminds one of the time 
when no living thing inhabited the earth but 
also utters vague prophecies of what may 
sometime be again. But that is looking ahead 
— let us look around. Mt. Desert, called 
" Monls Deserts " originally, now close at hand, 
presents a grand ajipearance from the sea. 
The tall, irregular hills covered with trees, 
now catching the sombre shadows of some 
stray cloud, then letting them go again, are 
objects of admiration. Perhaps the oft-quoted 
lines may last to do service hei-e once more : — 

" An island, full of hills and dells, 

All rumpled and uneven 
"With groou recesses, sudden swells. 

And odorous valleys, driven 
So deep and straight that alvraj-s there 

The wind is cradled to soft air." 

Charlie says he thinks Browning wrote 
these lines, and refers in part of the third one 
to some of the young men from college who 
abound at Bar Harbor at this time. I don't 
know how that is, but I always liked Brown- 
ing, except when he goes into the mysteries, 
or I am reading his wife's poetry. 

From Bar Harbor to Rockland is one of 
the pleasantest parts of the course. The 
approach to Castine is one of considerable 
interest. Not only do the low green banks 



strike the eye with their quiet beauty, but the 
appearance of the old town itself seems wor- 
thy the traditions told about it. Not far from 
here must the Baron of Castine have met his 
Indian bride, and Longfellow's beautiful poem 
is recalled. 

The crossing of Penobscot Bay is to be 
remembered for the great beaut}' of the sun- 
set. This event takes place to-night above a 
grand hill, a mile or two away. The dark clouds 
gathering so deep about the sun, and showing 
gold-jagged clefts, tlirough which something- 
throws a sort of metamorphosed light down 
upon the sea and into our faces, well merit the 
exclamations which the ladies are performing. 
The light is a little dim as Ave enter the broad 
harbor of Rockland, compared b}' James Free- 
man Clark with the Bay of Naples. The 
light-house on Owl's Head looks friendl}', but 
we speedily leave it in the distance and strike 
farther out to sea — we have made our last 
landing for the day, and noAv resign ourselves 
to meditations and the monotonous motions of 
the boat. The gold edge lingers a long time 
about the horizon. In the tAvilight a party of 
young tourists are singing old familiar songs, 
Avhile in their minds, no doubt, are pleasant 
memories of the summer, like the shore trees 
clear and separate now, but soon to croAvd to- 
gether and fade into one indistinguishable 
mass. Now quiet prevails. Even that old 
negro woman Avho has been singing all day to 
her refractory child, sings no longer. The 
broad belt of purple in the sky has long since 
grown broader and darker till the sky is cov- 
ered. The shadows looked Aveird upon the 
Avater. A slight wind is rising, and before 
this out-door air becomes too chilly I think I 
will go in. X. 
SMC . ^7^. 

BOATING. 

The result of the Springfield Regatta, 
though far from satisfactory to BoAvdoin, has 
nevertheless disclosed many weak points in 



76 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



the management of her boating aifairs, and 
should stimulate her to redoubled exertions 
for next summer's contest. We failed ; but 
about the failure there is a certain dignity 
which we share in common with the best col- 
legiate muscle of the country. We have 
gained another year's experience ; this a class- 
ical proverb denominates the best " coach," 
and it is certainly the only one which the rules 
of the Association allow for the next season. 
The assertion may smack of acid Isabellas, 
but it is nevertlieless true that defeat is often 
quite as valuable in the end as victory, and 
Yale, hopeful through successive years of fail- 
ure, and victorious at last, offers an example 
of jjZ«<c/i; which Bowdoin will do well to 
emulate. 

It is no easy matter to remain loyal to the 
" spruces," when summer moons and ladies' 
smiles allure to walks and waltzes ; and those 
men who willingly sacrifice all the pleasure of 
the summer season to win aquatic honors for 
their Alma Mater, the College duly appreciates. 
Our crew worked long and well, and failed . — 
from causes which lie far back of unwieldy 
boats and sluggish waters. Our boating sys- 
tem has a radical fault ; aside from the white- 
capped crew which annually fails to bring 
home the champion colors, boating at Bow- 
doin is decidedly " gauzy." We have a boat- 
house filled to the rafters with shells aud oars, 
but to our ears " spoons " and " feathers " 
convey only their primitive significance, and 
the skilled dip of an oar in the Androscoggin 
is as rare as a " sail " in Calculus. We can- 
not reasonably expect success when two or 
more green men annually take their seats in 
the boat, and we may therefore despair of 
seeing the champion flags while there are no 
experienced oarsmen outside of the " College 
Six." 

Of unskilled muscle we have enough and 
to spare ; the Association has two good six- 
oared shells in its possession ; these with the 
class boats and single shells should be filled at 



once, and at the next meeting of the Associa- 
tion some measures taken for a regatta em- 
bracing class races, &c. Let this take place 
early in October, and when the time comes 
for the selection of the next " six " we shall 
have many aspirants for seats in the boat, and 
an interest in boating matters in general, 
which will make the raising of a thousand 
dollars comparatively easy. 



MY FRIEND SYKES. 

Do you know my friend Sykes '? Some of 
you do, I am certain ; if not, I feel for you. 
He has a very patronly way witii him. I 
guess "patronly" is the word I want— >- at 
anj' rate I should say " matronly " if he was 
a woman. He watches over me, cares for me, 
and gives me friendly advice. I dre.ad the 
time when we must part, for he is getting to 
be as indispensable as a fancy cane, combining 
ornament with great utility. I happen to be 
a few months, or yeai's, older than he, but it 
was accidental and he never makes any account 
of it. 

Sykes has traveled ; he got asleep in the 
cars once and awoke in Boston, and his advice 
since that, although not urbane in itself, has 
an lu-bane flavor. 

My neckties don't suit Sykes. Poor fel- 
low ! I suppose I don't cater to his taste as 
much as I ought, especially as he does it all 
for my good, and disinterestedly. "Now, 
Jormer," he said the other day, " why do you 
wear that brown tie? you've worn it six 
months, and besides it's out of fashion." I 
felt greatly indebted to him for the informa- 
tion, for I didn't know the fashion had changed. 
But as a change of ties wasn't convenient 
just then I kept on wearing it, though I 
remembered his words just the same ; and I 
never see that brown cravat without tliinking 
of his solicitude in my behalf. Sykes knows 
I'm unsophisticated, and he thinks it his duty 
to put me on my guard. I can never repay 



\ 



BOWBOIN ORIENT. 



77 



him. He gave nie a valuable piece of advice 
the other day. I had been clerking it for 
Farley & Prince, Suttonville, and, although I 
shudder as I think of it now, I had made the 
acquaintance of a j'oung lady whom I, in my 
verdancj^ thought accomplished; though from 
what Sykes said afterwards I suppose I was 
grievously mistaken. But I anticipate. To 
return to Suttonville. That is, to return un- 
til I left, wliicli was soon, for business and 
pleasure called ine to another part of the 
State. Well, as luck would have it, the 3'oung 
lady's father wished to make an inquirj' of 
me and employed his daughter as amanuensis ; 
and I, thinking no harm, replied to him and 
partially to her. I mention all this to show 
how blindly and unsuspectingly I might have 
been led astray liad it not been for my good 
friend. He happened to be in the office when 
I got the next letter, and asked me if I had 
a female correspondent in Suttonville. Some 
would have said " None of your business " ; 
indeed, I tliink he himself would; but 
then he knows how to take care of himself, 
while I — well he seems to consider it his duty 
to look out for me. Not that I ever asked 
him to, O, no ; it is a self-imposed dutj', and 
all the more philanthropic for that reason. 
But I was saying — what was it? — oh, that 
he asked about my letter, and what could I 
do ? I saw no alternative but to make a clean 
breast of the whole, when he told me I had 
been doing very wrong — that I ought not 
to make any particular friends, male or female, 
until I had seen more of the world. I set 
out to venture the opinion that I knew whom 
and what I liked ; but just then I thought it 
would not be respectful to His Majesty and 
wisely kept silence. I- have not answered 
that young lady's father yet. I suppose Sykes 
wouldn't like it. 

Since writing the above I have' made a 
discovery. I thought Sykes was my peculiar 
friend, but I find he talks to some others in 



just the same way and they don't like it. One 
fellow said he had more impudence than Ben 
Butler, while another was more charitable, 
and thought he did the best he knew. 

Three or four thought they knew their 
own business best, and I'm rather inclined to 
think so myself. Still, I wouldn't say any- 
thing against Sykes, for he means well, and 
people shouldn't notice wha,t he sa3's when he 
gives advice that isn't wanted. 

JOKMER. 



THETA DELTA CHI FRATERNITY. 

Eta CuAKiiK. 
Whereas it hath pleased God in His wise prov- 
dence to remove from us our dear brother, George 
Edwin Smith, be it 

Besolved, That the Theta Delta Chi Fraternity, 
and especially the Eta Charge, have lost one whose 
manly virtues and intellectual attainments endeared 
him to us all. 

Besolved, That while we deeply feel our own loss, 
we would extend our lieartfclt sympathies to the 
bereaved parents and sisters in tliis time of sorrow 
and affliction. 

Besolved, That as a mark of respect to the mem- 
ory of the departed, the badge of our Fraternity be 
draped in mourning for thirty days. 

Besolved, That copies of these Resolutions bo 
sent to the iamily of tlie deceased and to the several 
charges of the Fraternity. 

E. S. HoisBS, Class 74, i 
W. A. Deeking, Class '75, V Com. 
C. S. Andrews, Class '76, ) 
Bowdoiu College, Aug. 28, 1873. 



Whereas it has pleased Almighty God in His 
supreme wisdom to remove from among us our 
respected classmate, George E. Smith, for two years 
associated with us in our studies, 

Besolved, That by his sudden and unexpected 
death, we, his classmates, are stricken with extreme 
sorrow and regret. 

Besolved, That wo shall long continue to remem- 
ber his diligent .and faithful application to his studies, 
and the patient and obliging disposition he mani- 
fested toward his associates, notwithstanding the 
discouraging condition of his health. 

Besolved, That we extend our heartfelt sympathy 
to his famUy in their bereavement of au only son 
and brother. 

Besolved, That a copy of these Resolutions be 
published in the Bowdoin Okient, and sent to the 
family of the deceased. 

W. Nevens, ) Com. of 

F. B. Osgood, v Class of 
Mtles Standish, ) '75. 



78 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DUR- 
ING THE COLLEGIATE YEAR AT 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE, 
By the Class of 1874. 

EDITORS. 

S. V. Cole, L. H. Kimball, 

W. T. GooDALE, D. .0. S. Lowell, 

F. W. Hawthorne, F. K. Wheeler, 

H. K. White. 

Terms — $2 00 a year in advance; single copies, 
15 cents. 

Address communications to Bowdoin Orient, 
Brunswick, Maine. 

For sale at 7 Appleton Hall, Bowdoiu College. 
Also by J. Griffin and B. G. Dennison, Brunswick ; 
and A. Williams & Co., 135 Washington St., Boston. 



CONTENTS. 
Vol. III., No. 7. — Sept 17, 1873. 

To a Blank Leaf. 73 

Claribel 73 

Letter 74 

Boating 75 

My Friend Sykes 76 

Kesolutions 77 

Editorial 78 

Communication 79 

Local 80 

American Association, &c 82 



Some changes have taken place in our 
College affairs since last term, and among the 
most noticeable are those in the Board of 
Instructors. The College has been both 
unfortunate and fortunate in this respect — 
unfortunate to lose men so well known and 
respected as Profs. Brackett and Goodale, and 
yet fortunate to obtain as successors others 
who came so highly recommended. 

Prof. Brackett has gone to Princeton, 
where he will have the advantages for original 



research in science which his many labors at 
Bowdoin would not allow. Prof. Goodale 
takes a position at Harvard. The former is 
succeeded here by Prof. Carmichael, a gentle- 
man who seems to be winning the respect of 
his classes ; the latter is succeeded by Prof. 
White. 

The College is to be congratulated on 
securing the services of Dr. Hopkins, ex- 
President of Wilhams, in Metaphysics. We 
understand he will be here by the beginning 
of next term. Mr. Noel-Hope has been ap- 
pointed Instructor in French. 



We acknowledge it seems a late hour to 
present a review of the proceedings and exer- 
cises of Commencement week, now fast becom- 
ing a thing of the receding past. Other and 
abler pens have written its record and criti- 
cised its merits. Two months have passed 
since that week of power, and its glories have 
long since been dimmed, and its faults long 
since been forgiven. 

But we of the Orient are peculiarly un- 
fortunate in having no earlier opportunity, so 
far as Commencement is concerned, for exer- 
cising our critical gifts and satisfying that 
rapacious passion inherent and inevitable in 
the human breast for " picking ilaws " in other 
men's doings. And while it is peculiarly 
wounding to our sensitive dignity as Seniors 
to acknowledge that there have ever been 
Seniors before, and especially to call up before 
our own memory and the notice of the world 
an epoch in their history which we have not 
yet reached, yet it would be, perhaps, inap- 
propriate to have nothing to say upon a Com- 
mencement in very many respects creditable 
both to Bowdoin and her sons. 

We contemplate no extended criticism, 
but a few comments on the most noticeable 
features. Perhaps the ablest effort of the , 
week (unless we accept the clear, forcible, 
and manly Baccalaureate of Pres. Harris) 



BOWBOm ORIENT. 



79 



was the address before the Alumni, by Prof. 
Goodwin. We could heartily coincide in the 
main with his views of the end and aim of a 
College Course, but we could not but think 
that this must be distasteful to the majority 
of Bowdoin authorities. He certainly gave 
no quarter to those who are clamorous for a 
more practical and '^scientific curriculum for 
our colleges. It was a most emphatic rebuke 
to this most popular demand of modern days. 
But we thought the Professor overshot his 
mark, or at least the true mark, in discarding 
to so great extent everything but the Classics 
and Mathematics. If the College Course is to 
be devoted almost solely to these, and the 
Professional Course exclusively to a single 
and special department, when shall we have 
our Chemistry and Natural History, Metaphy- 
sics, Rhetoric and Literature? But the ques- 
tion is still an open one, and the battle between 
the two schools is to be fought for many years 
yet. 

At the meeting of the Alumni Association 
the contest which is manifestly destined to 
be a vigorous one between the j'oung and ris- 
ing generation of Alumni and the stern old 
leaders of the Past, brought in a sharp debate. 
The questions are, "Shall the Board of Over- 
seers be elected bj^ the Alumni ?" and " Shall 
the Charter of the College be so amended that 
the State may legitimately grant her aid?" 
We will refrain from giving our own opinion 
on so delicate a subject, but will venture to 
predict that the college is destined to be placed 
on a wider and less sectarian basis than in the 
past, and be given up virtually to the control 
of its Alumni. 

The Commencement parts were, on the 
Avhole, undoubtedly creditable to the Class of 
'73, but we believe the general character of 
those, and of most Commencement parts, 
might be greatly improved, not by having 
more talented men write them, but by a simple 
change in subject and method of treating 
them. What we deprecate is the essay style 



on the Commencement platform. What we 
desire and hope to see are clear, manly, ring- 
ing orations containing some one strong idea, 
earnestly and zealously defended. Our Com- 
mencement rhetoric has too much unmeaning 
ornamentation, too many metaphor-clothed 
generalities, and not enough sturdy, vigorous 
thought and argument. 

A class of thirty-five were graduated and 
sent forth into the world, duly equipped with 
dijjloma and degree. We wish them success, 
and hope and expect to hear a good report 
from the Class of '73. 



To the Editors of the Orient. 

The manner in which Freshmen are intro- 
duced into our Secret Societies has been 
brought to our notice more forcibly than ever, 
perhaps, during the late pledging season. A 
controversy on the subject of postponing the 
time of pledging was engaged in, it will be 
remembered, at about the end of the last term. 
It was the first attempt for the attainment of 
postponing which has been made, for several 
years at least, in Bowdoin. There was at that 
time no definite action taken on the subject, 
but the convention at least showed that if 
the sentiment expressed by the delegates of 
the several societies was truly the sentiment 
of the societies, when the obstacle then exist- 
ing might be removed, postponement couM be 
effected. If the writer has not been misin- 
formed, the delegates of all the societies ex- 
pressed the wish that the arrangement might 
be carried into effect with the class of '78. 
The present term is the only one in which 
the agreement may be consummated. To 
suspend action on the matter until the winter 
term, would be disastrous, as it is desired and 
necessary that no man in '78 should be in- 
fluenced in any way or manner. The reason 
of this is too evident to require explanation. 

In the late campaign some facts were 
developed which were never before apparent. 



80 



BOWDOm ORIENT. 



The class is larger than has entered for many 
years, and the societies are more numerous. 
These facts combined have greatly increased 
the evils attendant on the old system. We 
have seen to a much greater extent than ever 
before that old hypocrisy which must always 
disgust everyone save the deluded candidate. 
We have seen the Freshman, for a short 
period, to be the apparent centre of attraction 
of numerous affable companions, but the mo- 
ment fishing is suspended he as strongly repels. 
There is no sincerity whatever in the atten- 
tions paid, and every society must realize that 
men and societies are deceived, and to the 
detriment of each, every year. This is un- 
doubtedly the most objectionable feature, 
unqualified deception. We are not forced to 
deceive, we can stand on our merits and 
defy the calumny of our enemies, some one 
may urge ; but if we consider for a moment 
in what position we should soon be if we acted 
under such advice, our views would be soon 
corrected. There is but one remedy for this, 
postponemejit. If we would do away with 
the present deception, and secure the safety 
both of candidates and of societies, there is 
no other course to be adopted. As far as can 
be judged from present circumstances nothing 
remains to hinder the adoption of postpone- 
ment by all the societies, except unwillingness 
to stand on one's own merit. No society can 
refuse that. Should any society fall under 
such an arrangement, failure would be deserved 
rightly. Cannot measures be taken immedi- 
ately to secure such desirable results ? N. 



We understand the new buildings for the 
Classical^ School at Hallowell are rapidly 
approaching completion. 

Bates College recently conferred the de- 
gree of LL.D. on Hon. Asa Redington. Short- 
ly afterwards the college received a donation 
of $10,000 from the same gentleman. Where 
is Bowdoin with her LL.D.'s? 



LOCAL. 



Lights out ! 

Election in a few days. 

Freshmen are numerous. 

A new uniform is suggested. 

Juniors report a " soft thing." 

Campus scavengers are jubilant. 

Of what avail are our certificates. 

Where shall we find a contortionist ? 

That circular saw is " brewing trouble. "rl.p' 

" How you do look with your bones off! " 

Only a few Freshmen reside within college 
w-alls. 

Freshmen keep an eye on the barometer 
about this tune. 

'76 says, " he climbed that door with the 
grace of an elephant." 

The Sophomores represent Noel-Hope as 
a prince of instructors. 

Several relicts of the late '73 have returned 
to " settle up the estate." 

The Ghost of '73 has been witnessed 
promenading the Campus. 

A fine copy of "Mother Goose" has been 
presented to the College Librar3^ 

Mr. C. C. Springer, '74, sails soon for 
Europe, to prosecute his studies there. 

Stentorian cries of " base-ball " no longer 
attract many enthusiasts to the Delta. 

St. Paul's Church has been undergoing 
quite extensive repairs during the vacation. 

The North End of Winthrop boasts of a 
piano, and the South End of Appleton two. 

Nos. 17 and 18 Winthrop have been con- 
verted into a drawing room for the use of 
Prof. Vose. 



{ 



BO WD OIN ORIENT. 



81 



R. E. Gray, m.d., of the Medical class of 
'72, has mterecl upon a course of study with 
the Seniors. 

Prof. Carmichael is endeavoring to lead 
the Seniors through the mazes of star clusters 
and nebulse. 

Our Canine Friend has been ill but is in a 
fair state of recovery, owing to tlie plentiful 
use of CeHeO. 

We think that Prof. Carmichael was fully 
justified in saying that "the spectrum analysis 
can't explain everything." 

Alas for the volunteers I The flag was 
not awarded them, but many gained the 
object for wliich they labored. 

The inhabitants of the " North End " will 
soon find themselves in danger of being 
" scattered " all over Topsham. 

As regards the driU, a Sophomore hopes 
the battalion will have no such inifortunate 
af-Fair as last year's. He is recovering slowly. 

The demand for horns has created a corner 
ill the tin market, and thereby delayed the 
celebration of six weddings of the "tin 
variety." 

The mournful sounds produced by the 
Sophomores on their tin horns are execrable. 
We wonder that we ever gloried in sucli 
childish sport. 

We wovdd refer that Freshman who asked 
us concerning the " artillerist's oath," to the 
inscription whicli appears on the chapel steps 
on damp mornings. 

Sacred and profane legend has attributed 
many an odd calling to the Sons of Zebedee, 
but it was reserved for the pastor on the hill 
to pronoimce them " successful fishers." 

Once more the Campus is invaded by 
" fiery sons of Mars," and the " Set-up Drill " 
is delighting many a poor Freshman's heart 
and straightening his rounded shoulders. 



The Freshman who oifered the tutor fifty 
cents for a pony to Livj-, desires us to say 
that he concedes the championship to that 
classmate who borrowed a broom at the Pres- 
ident's house. 

The sudden shower on Friday caused quite 
a stampede from tlie Delta. The acrobatic 
Freshmen showed then- skill in vaulting fences, 
while many of last term's " Invalids " walked 
between the posts with becoming gravity. 

In an old hymn book we find the follow- 
ing piece of information : — 

" To keep the lamp alive, 
With (lil we fill the bowl." 

How often has the truth of this been pain- 
fully conscious to us. 

The President has invited the attention of 
the students to Art. -i of the appendix to the 
College Laws. As this relates to the ex- 
change of rooms, and as there have been 
wholesale speculations in these commodities, 
serious trouble is antici})ated. 

The drill has begiui again in earnest. A 
new uniform is talked of. Tlie one proposed 
consists of a tight-fitting blue sack, belt, vfiih. 
the letter of the company on the buckle, and 
a " fatigue cap." On the whole quite a de- 
parture from the original one. 

Scene in front of " Gripus'." The " All- 
seeing Eye " struggling with an unruly mn- 
breUa, to Avhom appears gallant Junior. 

Junior — "Can I assist you Miss ?" 

" All-seeing Ej'e " (whose thoughts are uijon 
German Grammars) — " We expect three in 
the morning." ^ 

Scene at the " Tontine." Enter two in- 
fantile Freshmen. F. No. 1 (to clerk — 
" Show us to the best room m the house and 
send up hot suppers." F. No. 2 (compelled 
to say something) — " Immediately." Clerk 
(peeping down on the pair from behind the 
counter) — " We are out of nursing-bottles, 
but I win order the trundle-bed made up." 



82 



BO WD OUST ORIENT. 



Profs. Carmichael and Wliite, who succeed 
to the chairs of the Natural Sciences, show 
themselves admirable instructors, and are thus 
far popular with " the boys." The election 
of Moulton, '73, to a tutorship in Greek and 
Algebra, is regarded as an excellent selection. 

A modest Freshman in Appleton, shocked 
at the familiarity of his end-Avoraan, forbore 
to make any replies until he had called in a 
Senior, and been honored with an introduc- 
tion. On being informed by the pohte Senior, 
through the usual mode of presentation, that 
tliis was Mr. S., the gentle smoother of pil- 
lows replied that " she didn't doubt it." 

A few evenings since the " Temple Quin- 
tet " started out to serenade a newly elected 
instructor. The last named had evidently 
retired for the night, but, upon being invited 
to " hear their vow " before they went, arose 
and " came down " handsomely with the 
cigars. Elated thereby, the warblers pro- 
ceeded down the street until they reached 
that immaculate domicile wherein the bonnie 
box-makers were slumbermg. The enlivening 
strains of the " tinker and the cobbler " 
brought a half-dozen " leaded " heads to each 
window, and the " air " Avas forced to suggest 
that anything in the refreshment line would 
be appreciated. The shower of " FaU. PijD- 
pins " which followed, completely demoralized 
the " bouquet of artists " ; the tenor was 
attacked with hemorrhage at the nose, the air • 
and bass had their eyes blacked, Avhile the 
greedy baritone ran off munching the cholera 
pills, and is now a sadder and a Aviser man. 
To add to their indignities, a night patrol 
characterized their efforts as " hoAvling," and 
ordered them off his beat. If any person or 
persons have been serenaded since, it was not 
by the " Temples." 



The Trustees of the University of Chicago 
have passed resolutions admitting ladies into 
the college classes, Avithout consulting the 
editors of the Volante. Lamentable ! 



A. A. A. S. 

The American Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Science held its twenty-first 
Annual Meeting at Portland, Maine, begin- 
ning on the 20th ult., and continuing one 
week. Many important and interesting papers 
were read and discussed. An unusually large 
number of members were present, including 
the greater part of the older scientists of the 
country. Altogether, it Avas one of the most 
important meetings the Association has held. 

The officers of this meeting Avere Prof. 
Joseph Lovering of Harvard University, Pres- 
ident ; A. H. Worthen, State Geologist of 
Illinois, Vice President; Prof. C. A. White 
of BoAvdoin College, General Secretary; F. 
W. Putnam, Salem, Mass., Permanent Secre- 
tary, and W. S. Vaux, Philadelphia, Treasurer. 
No member is re-eligible to the first three 
offices, respectively. The officers elect, to 
serve at the next meeting, are Dr. John L. 
Leconte of Philadelphia, President ; Prof. C. 
S. Lyman of Yale College, Vice President, 
and Dr. A. C. Hamlin of Bangor, Maine, Gen- 
eral Secretary. The next meeting is to be 
held in Hartford, Connecticut, on the second 
Wednesday of August, 1874. 



The Volante is a Avonderful paper. We 
never doubted its ability, and we think it 
stands high also in its own opinion. The way 
in which it does some things, especially the 
way in which it makes its criticisms, might 
call the gods to envy. 

The retiring board of editors have just 
fired their parting salute — a mixture of 
muddy criticism and doubtful courtesy hurled 
at the college press in general. Thinking 
perhaps their shot might have mortal e£fectj| 
they begin by saying they are nothing but 
men — an assumption Avhich they ought to 
know carries Avith it a certain degree of re- 
sponsibility. 

They give us to understand the morals of 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



83 



the Eastern press would long since have 
been in perdition had not this beacon in the 
West led them back under the influence of 
* its benign rays. Then, after reminding all 
concerned that they always set a good ex- 
ample of criticising in a gentle manner, they 
rush among us with scythe and pitchfork, cut- 
ting down all they can and pitching them into 
the common waste-basket — the Vdantes 
opinion. 

Some papers, however, whose age or abil- 
ity have given them a right to stand, they 
pat on the head in a very patronizing way, 
calling this paper a good little paper and that 
paper a better little paper, and bidding them 
live and be happy. Such fortunates are the 
Chronicle and Advocate. The Magenta finds 
itself called a rare flower that snarls and 
shows /aZse teeth occasionally. 'Poovflozver., to 
be endowed with such a monstrous character! 

The Amherst Student is notified that it 
ought to be better. Does the Volante really 
like to be surpassed ? 

The Tripod must be content to have no 
brains. 

The Orient — but we forbear lest they 
think we take offense. The Lit. is placed at 
the head of college magazines. 

The finishing of this masterpiece is a fare- 
well to a part of the college press, and cheer- 
ing advice to the remainder to conmiit suicide. 

What opinions the newly-elected editors 
may have, we know not ; but certainly the 
dust which their predecessors have striven to 
raise around their departure we hope may not 
settle into their eyes. 



Rev. Dr. Henry E. Robbins of Rochester, 
N. Y., was elected President of Colby Uni- 
versity, at last Commencement, and has 
entered upon his duties. We understand 
that his election and acceptance give great 
satisfaction to the friends of the University, 
and this is in no wise diminished by the fact 
that Dr. Robbins is popular with the students. 
At Colby, three j^oung ladies are members of 
the Freshman Class. 



TIME TABLE. 

Trains leave Brunswick for — 

Augusta — 8.30 A.M. ; 2.35 and 7,00 P.M. ; 1.50 

A.M. (Pull.) 

Bangor — 2.35 p.m. ; 1.50 a.m. (Pull.) 

Bath — 7.40 and 8.30 a.m. ; 2.30, 5.10 and 7.00 

P.M. 

Boston — 7.38 a.m.; 2.05 and 5.00p.m.; 12 M. 

(Pull.) 
Farmington — 2.30 p.m. 
Lewiston — 7.40 a.m. ; 2.30 and 7.00 p.m. 
Portland — 7.33 a.m. ; 2.05 and 5.00 p.m. ; 12 m. 

(Pull.) 
Waterville — 2.35 p.m. ; 1.50 a.m. (Pull.) 



BUSINESS CARDS. 

S TROUT & HOLMES, 
Counselors at Law, 
No. 88 Middle Street (Canal Bank Building), POETLAND, ME. 

A. A. .<iTBOCT. GEO. F. HOLMES ('66). 

JOSEPH A. LOCKE (Bowdoin, '65), Attorney and Counsellor at Law, 
74 Middle Street, cor. Exchange Street, PORTLAND. 



JOSIAH n. DRUMMOND (Colby, '46) Counsellor at Law, 100 Exchange 
street, PORTLAND. 



NOYES, HOLMES & COMPANY, 

219 fyashington St. and 10 Bronifield St., 
BOSTON, MASS. 

PUBLISHEES AND BOOKSELLERS, 

AND WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

STATIONERS, 

AU kinds of COLLEGE AND SCHOOL TEXT BOOKS, and STANDARD 
AND MISCELLANEOUS LITERATURE, supplied at 

LOW PRICES. 

Orders by Mail or Express will receive prompt and careful attention. 
These books may be obtained through J. P. BICKFOKD, Agent, No. 21 
Maine Hall. 

DIVINITY SCHOOL OP HAEVAED UNIVEESITY 

This School is open to persona of all denominations. Pecuniary aid ia 
afforded to those who are needy and deserving. 
The nest academic year will begin 

SEPTEMBER 26Tn. 

Further information will be given on application to 

Prof. OLIVEE STEARNS, D.D., 
Or Prof. E. J- YOUNG, 

Caubrioob, Maas. 



84 



BOWBOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Classical Department. 

TERMS OF ADMISSION. 

Candidates for admission into the Freshman Class are examined as fol- 

Harkneaa's Latin Grammar, including Prosody; Parts I. and II, Hark- 
ness's Introduction to Latin Prose Composition-, Tirgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the ^neid; Cicero's Select Orations; Sallust. 

Hadley's or Goodwin's Greek Grammar; Goodwin's Greek Reader; or 
Xenophon's Anabasis, 4 books, and Homer's Iliad, 2 books. 

Arithmetic; Algebra, to equations of the second degree; Davies's 
Legendre's Geometry, first and third books. 

English Grammar; Ancient and Modern Geography. 

Scientific Department. 

TEBMS OF ADMISSION. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the following subjects : — 
Mathematics — Arithmetic, including Common and Decimal Frac- 
tions. Interest, and Square Root; Algebra, to Equations of the 
Second Degree; Geometry, Books I. and III. of Davies's Le- 
gendre. 
Geojfra;)/ty— Political Geography, and simple elements of Astrono- 
mical and Physical Geography. 
History — Leading facts in general History, and especially in Ameri- 
can History. 
Latin — Allen's Latin Grammar, or the equivalent. 
English — The examination will consist in Ist, Reading aloud a pas- 
sage from some standard author, with explanations of gram- 
matical construction, and definition and derivation of words; 2d, 
Writing a few sentences in English, on some familiar subject, 
reference being had to spelling and punctuation as well as to 
composition; 3d Correction^ of ungrammatical sentences com- 
posed for the purpose. 
All candidates for admission must produce certificates of their good 
moral character. 

The time for admission is the Friday after Commencement, and the 
first Thursday of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants may be 
examined at other times. 

Courses of Study. 

The regular course of Instruction is that commended by the leading 
colleges of the country as eminently adapted_to secure liberal culture. 

THE SCIENTIFIC COURSE 

has been recently organized. Thirty-four students have already entered, — 
a fact which indicates that the College has been successful in its effort to 
meet the demand for a liberal course of study which shall at the same 
time look towards the actual uses and applications of knowledge. 

The studies pursued in this course are comprised in the following: — 
Zrfinf/wafires— English one year, and optional two ; Latin one yeari 
optional three ; French one year, optional three ; German one 
year, optional two ; Spanish, Italian, Swedish, Anglo-Saxon, one 
year. 
Mathematics — Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, Mensuration, 
Spherical Trigonometry, Analytical Greometry ; Differential and 
Integral Calculus, with the application of these to Surveying, 
Navigation, Projections, Dialling, Levelling, Astronomy, Mechan- 
ics, Topographical and Hydrographical Engineering. 
Natural History — Geology, Mmeralogy, Botany, Zoology, with their 
relations to the Industrial Arts. 



Natural Philosophy — Mechanics, Hydrodynamics, Pneumatics, 
Optics, Astronomy, Light, Heat, Electricity, &c. 

Chemistry — In all its branches and applications. 

History and Political Science — General, Medieval and Modern His- 
tory, Political Economy, General Principles of Law, Interna- 
tional Law, Law of Evidence, Constitution of United States, 
Theory of Government, American Law. 

Philosophy — Rhetoric, Logic, Psychology, Metaphysics, Evidences 
of Natural and Revealed Rehgion, Ethics, Esthetics. 

The studies of the first two years are common throughout the Depart- 
ment and are intended to lay a broad and substantial foundation for all 
branches of subsequent study. In the last two years the studies are 
arranged in distinct courses, in accordance with certain leading objects : a 
general scientific culture, or special technical skill. Attention is particu- 
larly invited to the iacilities offered for the thorough study of Civil Engi- 
neering. 



A POST-GRADUATE COURSE 

of two years is also commenced, in which Instruction will be given in 
the following schools: — 

I. Letters — Comprising Languages, Ancient and Modern (includ- 
ing the Oriental) with their literatures ; Philology ; Rhetoric; 
Logic ; History ; Elocution ; the Fine Arts. This leads to the 
degree of Master of Arts. 

H. Science — Advanced Mathematics, Physics, Natural History and 
Chemistry, in their uses and applications. This leads to the 
degree of Doctor of Science. 

m. Philosophy — Comprising the above, considered in their reasons 
and relations ; Psychology, Metaphysics, Ethics, Esthetics ; Poli- 
tics ; Theory of Government, Constitutional History, Principles 
of Law, International Law. Leading to the degi-ee of Doctor of 
Philosophy, 

rv. Medicine — The Medical School of Maine. Degree, — M. D. 

Students who are not graduates will be received on satisfactory evi- 
dence of proficiency in study which will enable them to profit by this 
Course. 

Much and careful attention is given to Physical Culture under the train 
ngof accomplished Instructors. The Gymnasium is well provided with 
approved apparatus, and the opportunities for Military drill and discipline 
are of the very best. 

It is but just to say that good morals and manliness are distinguishing 
features of college life at Bowdoin. 

The Library of Bowdoin is one of rare value, and the choicest works 
are constantly added. The (Jallery of Paintings is well known to be one o 
the most remarkable in the country. The Cabinet and apparatus are 
ample for their purpose. 

The annual expenses are, for tuition, &c., $90. Board $2.50 and $4.00 
a week. Pecuniary assistance, from the Income of thirty scholarships and 
various other benefactions, is rendered to those who are unable fully to 
meet their expenses otherwise. 

Commencement July 10th. Examination for admission July 12th and 
Aug. 28th, at 9 A.M. 

First term begins Aug. 28th, at evening. 

Every encouragement will be given to persons who desire to pursue 
any study taught in the College. 

The town of Brunswick, situated on tide water — the Androscoggin River 
on one side and the Ocean on the other ; already a seat of various manu- 
factures and destined to become one of the principal railroad centres of the 
State, easy also of access from all quarters, — presents an excellent locality 
for scientific as well as literary pursuits, while the facilities afforded by 
Bowdoin College, its Libraries, Galleries of Art, Cabinets, Scientific Col- 
lections, Laboratories, and Apparatus, offer great inducements to the ear- 
nest student of the Useful and Liberal Arts 



Vol. hi. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, OCTOBER 1, 1873. 



No. 8. 



THE DRYAD. 

One day when the winds were still, 

And the sun was low down in the sky, 

And sun -wares from hill to hill 
Rolled, bearing an exquisite dyo 

Unto all the waves of the wood. 

Till the miles of forest -sea 
TVcro covered with tints of blood, — 

A dryad stepped out of Its tree. 

And feeling a blight in the air. 

And recalling a day that was spent, 

"With an old-time song, in despair. 
The dryad began to lament: 

" The fair young Summer is dead ! 

The breath from the Summer is gone ! 
In a robe of crimson red 

She is lying all still and alone. 

"The light fallen out of her eyes! 

A coldness drawn over her breast! 
And colder tho lights in the skies 

■Will look on the world she has blessed. 

" How I miss the sound of her voice 
In the song of brook and bird ! 
In the forest paths the noise 
Of her stops is never heard, 

"In vain will the dryads meet. 

And the wind come up from the sea. 
For the dearest of all they '11 greet 
No more by the trysting tree. 

"The large leaves glowing bright, 
Sail slowly, sadly down 
On the river of golden light 

That flows over field and town. 

"0, her life shines into her death! 

As the sunset resembles the dawn. 
Still lively indeed, — but the breath 
And soul of her being are gone." 

Heineioh. 



EPITAPHS. 

We wandered to the church-yard the 
other day and read the inscriptions. Then 
we reflected. Had we been a poet, doubtless 
we should have mused. But we are not. 
Notwithstanding this deplorable fact, if we 
cannot amuse the public with our musings we 
will afflict them with our reflections. 

We read a few accounts of the lives of the 
departed, and for a time thought with the 
child of whom Milton, or Josephus, or some- 
body else wrote — " Where are the bad folks 
buried?" At length the aforenamed reflec- 
tions came to our aid and we pondered thus: 
All flesh is grass, and the grass withereth. 
That was poetical ; the only trouble being it 
was not strictly original. We do not hesitate 
to confess it — we had heard the same idea 
advanced before and do not Avish to be cred- 
ited with it. Besides, added to the lack of 
originality was the fact that we were not by 
nature favored of the Muses, and our cogita- 
tions grew prosaic forthwith. Why must 
men die before their good qualities can be 
discerned ? 

Has a man great love of approbation (a 
phrenological deformity possessed by some), 
and is he starving for flattery? Let him just 
give up the ghost and forthwith hidden vir- 
tues spring to light, and those who thought 
of him before only with indifference, now vie 
in giving him praise ; but unfortunately the 
poor fellow is hardly in a condition to realize 
and fully appreciate it. 

A woman dies who in her lifetime was a 
household drudge, scolded by her husband, 
disobeyed by her children, neglected by her 
neighbors ; but no sooner has the breath left 
her clayey tabernacle than benignant Dor- 



86 



BOWBOIN ORIENT. 



cases come from every quarter to console the 
afflicted relatives and extol the good-hearted- 
ness of the dear departed ; husband and chil- 
dren speak of her in tender tones, and a costly 
stone is raised above her corse, on which is 
chiseled, 

" N"one knew her but to Iofb lier." 
Poor thing! she never suspected it while 
alive. 

"Many a time and oft" have we witnessed 
the obsequies of those who had no praise in 
life, but whose actions and intentions were 
too often unkindly criticised; yet no sooner 
did the mystic seal of death close lip and eye 
and ear, than the tongues of men were" loosed 
and they spake words that would have cheered 
the heart of the most desponding if uttered 
during life. O, human inconsistency ! Why 
not observe the same rule through life? As 
if the dead care Avhat is said about them ! 
For our part we would much prefer our epi- 
taph while living. We wish men in general 
were a little more like tombstones — upright 
and square — free to communicate the good 
deeds and qualities of others, but silent where 
no good can be said. 

Would that we had the power of meta- 
morphosis, for then we would bring some of 
the good, heavenly tombstones out into society, 
and station fault-finders, tale-bearers and slan- 
derers in their place, where their grumbling, 
babbling and insinuations would concern the 
dead alone, whom they could not injure. 



SCIENTIFIC OBSERVATIONS. 

[By pevmissmn of Prof. Carmichael Tve reprint the 
following from The College Neics-Lette>:'\ 

Dm-ing the night of March 25th, of the 

present year, a light, crystalline snow had 

fallen, and a moderate wind left the surface 

smooth and firm, but without a crust. On 

the following morn the writer had occasion 

to pass near the Iowa Central track, in front 

of a house occupied at the time by a Pro- 



fessor of Iowa College. Happening to look 
down I saw the snow pretty well covered 
with fine winding furrows, much like the 
tracks of some small insect bodies, or still 
more strikingly resembling the traces left by 
worms in the ooze of drying pools. 

It was not the season certainly to look for 
animal life, yet I confess I could not think of 
any other explanation for such remarkable 
furrows. They had about the breadth of a 
goose quill, were very tortuous or convoluted, 
and stretched out would have measured from 
one to ten inches. The suggestion that these 
were formed by some animal, new to science, 
seemed to be confirmed by the observation 
that at the end of every furrow a small black 
body, having about the size of a house fly, 
could be seen, or if not at first visible, could 
be found by removing the snow. 

What were these moving specks? A 
glance showed them to be not worms, but 
cinders from the passing locomotives. How 
could cinders thus crawl and burrow ? Not 
from the wind, for that could have moved 
them but in one direction ; not from gravity, 
for while some had moved down an inclined 
plane, others had actually moved up hill. 
The sun had been partially obscured during 
the morning, but soon after the time of first 
observation appeared, when the cinders which 
had not already done so, quickly burrowed in 
the snow. Some fragments of bituminous 
coal were placed upon the snow. These, too, 
soon worked out of sight, not going down in 
a straight line, but back and forth. The rea- 
son why black objects penetrate snow is very 
familiar ; they absorb more heat than the 
snow, and the latter is melted by this warmth. 
Should the accession of temperature be not 
too great the film of water would, as it were, 
grease the way of the cinder, and like a drop 
of water on a red hot surface, it would be in 
a state of equilibrium, easily disturbed by 
incident forces. The heat coming from above 
and the cinder being only a medium conduc- 



BO WD OIN ORIENT. 



87 



tor, the film woukl form most rapidly along 
the upper edge, and as the surrounding snow 
could not be perfectly uniform the adhesion 
of the film to the cinder and also to the snow, 
would give the particle its initial motion in 
the direction in which this force acted most 
strongly. Having started, the further ad- 
dition of heat would be principally conducted 
away through the film on the side to which 
it had already been drawn, and not being 
balanced by any attraction towards the fur- 
row in its wake, it would move steadily 
onward. Meeting with irregularities and 
obstacles it would naturally turn to the right 
and left. Such would seem to be the ex- 
planation of the remarkable movements of 
these particles. 

Tlie absence of suitable conditions since the 
above observation, has prevented any attempt 
to imitate the movement. The trial must cer- 
tainly be made when the sun is not shining 
brio-htly, as the heat then communicated would 
cause the particles to rapidly sink in the snow. 
Even when entirely covered with snow it was 
found that during bright sunshine fragments 
of coal would continue to bore their way. 
Several years ago in examining the glacier 
'■^ Mer de jjlace" in Switzerland, it seemed to 
me that the sand of the lateral moraines was 
subject to some force which scattered it. We 
now see that this is by no means impossible, 
though further observations would be neces- 
sary for its confirmation. 

The movement of bowlders upon ice is a 
well known phenomenon. The mass of rock 
fending off raj^s of the sun protects the ice 
underneath, while that surrounding it is grad- 
ually melting away. Thus the bowlder slowly 
rises upon a pedestal, and as the heat is the 
most iutense upon the south, it at last topples 
over on that side. Tlie mass of rock rises 
upon a second pedestal, and again falls in the 
same direction. By a repetition of this pro- 
cess the bowldei's, which glaciers almost always 
carry, are constantly walking, or rather leap- 



ing, on one leg towards the south. In the case 
of sand the action is entirely different, for here 
the heat absorbed is entirely communicated to 
the ice, and the small patches of this material 
melt deep holes in the ice. These openings 
are filled with water, and the traveler vainly 
seeks the bottom with an Alpine walking stick. 
The holes are not vertical, but always point 
toward the sun at midday, and hence are 
called Mittagsloclier (midday holes). We now 
see that small grains may also have a horizon- 
tal gliding motion upon congealed water. 



JOHN GUTENBERG. 

Of all the triumphs of modern genius the 
discovery of the art of printing has been the 
most important and most fruitful : and j'et of 
all, its origin is most obscure, its history most 
enveloped in fable. It has taken centuries 
for the world to learn the worth of the bene- 
faction and the merit of the benefactor, and 
when this was tardily appreciated, the in- 
ventor's name was buried in the oblivion of 
the past. But the research of later years has 
proved beyond question that the credit of 
taking the step which has led the way to every 
other step in modern progress, is due to John 
Gutenberg of Mainz. He was born at that 
place in or about the year 1400. His family 
was of honorable descent and of considerable 
wealth. But little is known of his early life, 
save that about the year 1824 he removed to 
Strasbourg. This was the scene of his great 
invention and of most of his active life. Gut- 
enberg was a man of wonderful mechanical 
genius and inventive powers. He became 
famous in the city for his strange arts and 
skillful contrivances. One of these was the 
art of polishing stones, which he taught to 
others, whose profits he shared with them. 

What time he began to study types and 

presses it is difficult to ascertain. But some 

time previous to 1439 we begin to hear of a 

I certain special art yet more valuable than its 



B WD OIN OBIENT. 



predecessors, but around which, as around 
them, a shroud of mystery was thrown. Al- 
though to Gutenberg all the credit of its dis- 
covery was attached, yet, as before, others 
were taught the art and shared the gains of 
the business. There can be little doubt that 
this was the origin of printing. Here was 
laid the corner stone of the future structure. 
For before the year 1439 one of Gutenberg's 
partners died, and his heirs instituted a suit 
against the former for the recovery of certain 
damages. The case was decided in Guten- 
berg's favor, December 12, 1439. But the 
great importance of this trial, whose records 
we still have, lies in the evidence of the wit- 
nesses which proves that the wonderful art 
these Strasbourg mechanics so much prized, 
was nothing more nor less than printing. 
There are various paragraphs in the testimony 
referring to presses, types, forms, and lead as 
a material they had to purchase. Two things 
are pretty conclusively shown, that the date 
of the discovery of printing was between 
1435 and 1439, and that before the latter 
date metal types had been introduced. It 
does not appear that Gutenberg had, prior to 
this time, published any printed books, but the 
initiatory steps in the great enterprise were 
undoubtedly taken. Pecuniarily the invention 
was disastrous to the inventor, for we soon 
find him stuggling with financial embarrass- 
ments. About 1445, he returned to Mainz, 
and in 1449 entered into partnership with 
Johann Faust to whom, for many years, the 
invention was ascribed. 

John Trithemius, the biographer, in 1515, 
placed the invention of the art in 1451, 
although he justly gives to Gutenberg the 
main credit of the discovery. But his dates 
are undoubtedly wrong although his account 
of the progress of the invention is interesting 
and valuable. He says : " At this time (1451), 
in the city of Mainz on the Rhine, in Ger- 
many, and not in Italy, as some have errone- 
ously written, that wonderful and then un- 



heard-of art of printing and characterizing 
books was invented and devised by John 
Gutenberg, a citizen of Mainz, who, having 
expended almost the whole of his property in 
the invention of this art, and on account of 
difiiculties which he experienced on all sides, 
was about to abandon it altogether, when, by 
the advice and through the means of John 
Faust, likewise a citizen of Mainz, he suc- 
ceeded in bringing it to perfection. At first 
they formed (engraved) the characters or let- 
ters in written order on blocks of wood, and 
in this manner they printed the vocabulary, 
called a ' Catholicon.' But with these forms 
(blocks) they could print nothing else, because 
the characters could not be transposed in these 
tablets, but were engraved thereon, as we 
have said. To this invention succeeded a 
more subtile one, for they found out the 
means of cutting the forms of all the letters 
of the alphabet, which they called matrices, 
from which again they cast characters of cop- 
per or tin, of sufficient hardness to resist the 
necessary pressure, which they had before en- 
graved by hand." 

In 1455, Gutenberg again became involved 
in a quarrel with his partner which resulted 
in lawsuit. Tliis time Gutenberg lost and 
was compelled to surrender their entire stock, 
and with it, of coui-se, the invention, into the 
hands of Faust, and retire from the business. 
He still, however, remained in Mainz, and we 
have good evidence that he continued to print, 
although no books of his publishing are ex- 
tant. Like all that unfortunate class of new- 
idea men, Gutenberg received little honor 
while alive, and for many years after his death 
the world failed to realize the greatness of his 
achievement. He died about the close of the 
year 1467 in the city of Ms birth. Posterity 
has endeavored, in some degree, to make 
amends for the ill-success of Gutenberg dur- 
ing his life. In 1837 a splendid monument 
in bronze,- by Thorwaldsen, was erected to 
his memory in Mainz ; and in Strasbourg, the 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



89 



scene of his immortal discovery, a similar 
honor has been conferred. 



CLASS ELECTIONS. 

The Seniors in their election this year 
have fallen into the same errors which have 
so often brought trouble and ill-feeling upon 
their predecessors. The result and the special 
causes which led to it we give in another 
column. The great primitive cause which 
brought on such results Ues far back of all 
this, almost in the very structure of our Col- 
lege Society. We do not mean, we do not 
think it our place, to discuss this particular 
case. We intend here only to consider the 
general question, " What is the proper method 
of holding a class election ? " 

We will answer this question, Yankee- 
like, by asking another, What is the purpose 
of this election, what are these officers elected 
for ? For Class Day merely. All tliis prep- 
aration points directly at this. All these offi- 
cers are chosen to be the exponents of the 
class on that Day of Days. The Oi-ator is not 
chosen to represent a society but to deliver 
the class oration. The Poet is not selected to 
satisfy the political ambition of a certain clique 
but to write the class poem. If, then, the 
object we all have in view is that our class 
day may be most creditable to us, the question 
is answered. Class honors should be awarded 
onl}' to the men who are best fitted to sustain 
them. It matters not of what society he is, 
or how personally unpopular, or how much or 
how little already honored, the man for the 
place is the man to be elected. 

Again, if a single society, from peculiar 
good fortune, has the men for every position, 
every one should be filled from that societj'. 
We know not how heretical or unconventional 
this may be, but, though it is a theory hitherto 
unexpressed in Avords, we believe it must be 
the sentiment of every candid man. Of 
course we shall expect difference of judg- 



ment as to the fitness of various candidates. 
Of course personal feeling and society pride 
wiU creep in to mould opinions. But the basis 
of decision, the test question, should be who is 
the best man, and not to what society does he 
belong. Let us seek to bury from sight 
society names and society distinctions at these 
elections. Let us remember that it is class 
honor and not society honor that is to be 
maintained on class day. Let class patriotism 
swamp QXQvy consideration of society pride. 
It may be said that this will do for an ideal 
theory but it would be utterlj^ impossible to 
make it practical. We do not believe it. We 
do not believe at all in ideals that are not 
fitted for real experience. "Where thei-e is a 
will there is a way." When men love an ideal, 
whose realization depends entirely upon them, 
what obstacle is there in the way of its feasi- 
bility ? 

It may be said again that while the per- 
sonal merit of the men should be the chief 
criterion, one society should not be left unrep- 
resented or another reap all the honors. We 
have no sj'mpathy with this society emulation 
in an affair tiiat concerns the class alone. If 
society considerations are to control the mat- 
ter at all, they should control it altogether, and 
such will inevitably be the result. The oidy 
way to remedy its abuses is to sweep away 
the s3-stera altogether. 

Most of all (and here we know we have 
the sympathy of everj' one) we deprecate and 
denoimce that S3^stem which has of late years 
ruled class elections and reflected such dis- 
credit on those concerned in it. We mean 
the combinations of two or more societies 
against all the others to reap all the honors 
themselves. We care not how hard we hit 
here for we hit every one. It is a most detest- 
able way of electing class officers, and fitly 
illustrates the universal depravity of the 
human heart. We hope and believe the sj^s- 
tem'is on its last legs, that the example of the 
class of '74 will be a warning to its successors. 



90 



JBOJVDOI]^ ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PUBLISHED EVEET ALTERNATE "WEDNESDAY DUK- 
ING THE COLLEGIATE TEAR AT 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE, 
Br THE Class of 1874. 

EDITORS. 

S. V. Cole, L. H. Kimball, 

W. T. GooDALE, D. 0. S. Lowell, 

F. W. Hawthorne, F. K. Wheeler, 

H. K. White. 

Terms — • $2 00 a year in advance; single copies, 
15 cents. 

Address communications to Bowdoin Orient, 
Brunswick, Maine. 

For sale at 7 Appleton Hall, Bowdoiu College. 
Also by J. GriflSn and B. G. Deunison, Brunswick ; 
and A. Williams & Co., 135 Washington St., Boston. 



CONTENTS. 
Vol. III., No. 8. — Oct. 1, 1873. 

The Dryad 85 

Epitaphs 85 

Scientific Observations 86 

John Gutenberg 87 

Class Elections 89 

Editorial 90 

Local 91 

The Society Campaign 93 

Boating Meeting 93 

Freshman OfBcers 93 

Alumni Record 94 



The Senior election has resulted in a seri- 
ous division in the class. Both sides deplore 
the result, but both are firm in their determi- 
nation not to yield. The few facts which are 
undisputed are these : Two parties were 
formed, based, as has been the case so many 
times before, on the jealousies of the various 
secret societies. It is even disputed which 
side took the field first, each party throwing 
the odium of the first act of hostility on the 



other. The party which we will call Side 
No. 1 secured a call by the proper authority 
for a meeting to be held on the afternoon of 
Friday, September 19th. Side No. 2 declared 
that this w^as a trap sprung upon them when 
some of their men were away and unable to 
reach the place in time, and determined, if 
possible, to eifect an adjournment. Their 
opponent denied the charge and affirmed that 
the afternoon in question was the fairest time 
for the election. The meeting was held at 
two o'clock, and after a little preliminary 
skirmishing, the test question of adjournment 
was taken, and resulting in a tie, the tempor- 
arj' chairman gave the casting vote in the 
affirmative. Thereupon Side No. 1 withdrew 
to a neighboring room and proceeded to elect 
the list of officers given below, asserting as 
their reason for this action that the adjourn- 
ment had been effected by the vote of a 
member who was at the time suspended, and 
that the illegality of his vote nullified the 
adjournment. Side No. 2 denied the illegality 
of his vote on the ground that he had the 
express permission of the President to attend 
this meeting, and they also affirmed that the 
second meeting was not attended by a quorum 
of the class. Accordingly on the following 
morning, the time to which the meeting was 
adjourned, they again assembled and elected 
the following officers : Marshal, W. M. Pay- 
son; President, Harry Johnson ; Orator, C. 
M. Ferguson ; Poet, F. W. Hawthorne ; 
Chronicler, W. T. Goodale ; Prophet, A. G. 
Bradstreet ; Odist, A. L. Perry ; Chaplain, 
F. K. Wheeler; Parting Address, H. V. 
Moore; Committee on Music, C. H. Hunter, 
C. A. Pike, A. H. Powers; Committee on 
Arrangements, G. B. Wheeler, J. W. Pray, 
Thos. Kneeland. The officers elected on the 
preceding day were : Marshal, R. A. Gray ; 
President, T. C. Simpson ; Orator, H. G. 
White ; Poet, L. H. Kimball ; Chronicler, W. 
H. Moulton ; Prophet, S. V. Cole ; Odist, A. 
L. Perry ; Chaplain, J. P. Eickford ; Parting 



BOWBOIN ORIENT. 



91 



Address, E. N. Merrill ; Committee on Music, 
E. S. Hobbs, C. T. Kimball, C. J. Palmer; 
Committee on Arrangements, C. E. Smith, 
H. H. Emery, Thomas Kneeland. 



The last, worst, and most unpopular act of 
our military government, so fast becoming a 
military despotism, has been enacted and car- 
ried into effect. Henceforth every student 
must provide himself with a uniform, what- 
ever may be his means, whatever his individ- 
ual choice. The sole alternative is squarely 
and sternly presented to him, " Buy a uni- 
form or be expelled." No plea of inability 
will be accepted ; no excuse will avail. In 
fact, so far as drill is concerned, the word ex- 
cuse has been blotted out of its vocabulary ; 
the existance of such a thing is almost wholly 
ignored. 

It is understood that some men have re- 
solved to stand out and refuse to submit to 
this. If so, their fate is predetermined. Glori- 
ous martyrdom ! We believe there is no pos- 
sible justification for this act on the part of 
the authorities. We fail to see by what intri- 
cate and tortuous line of argument the Fac- 
ulty convinced themselves of their moral right 
to enforce it. Their only plea is the plea of 
mi'i'ht. The only defence possible is tliat they 
have the lawful authority to do anything they 
choose in the government of the College, 
however revolting to every principle of jus- 
tice or generosity. So far from having ex- 
pendiency as its justification, the act was the 
height of folly. It will work positive harm 
to the institution at home and abroad. It 
has done more than anything else in the gov- 
ernment of the military department to inflame 
that spirit of sullen but hitherto passive dis- 
content which has long pervaded the College. 
Never did Bowdoin come nearer to the brink 
of mutiny than she did immediately after the 
promulgation of this order. When the facts 
are known to the public, as they wiU. be sooner 



or later, it cannot fail to meet with its disap- 
probation. The plan from the outset has met 
with no favor outside the little circle of those 
to whom it has been a pet scheme. This last 
and most overbearing act of all will cast new 
odium upon it. The drill has driven off stu- 
dents already, and it will drive off more and 
more as it becomes more and more rigid and 
dictatorial in its requirements. 

If the expenditure were necessarj'- to carry 
out the main end of the military department 
it would have some justification. But no 
such plea can be urged. The sole object is to 
enable the battalion to make a showy display 
on the parade ground. 

We do not know what will come of it, but 
venture to predict this is the beginning of the 
end. 



LOCAL. 



Quid nimc ? 

Fishing is over. 

Pianos are increasing. 

" How we do bounce ! " 

" Lots of fun " at class elections. 

Open wood-fires are very popular. 

Horns and water are still plentiful. 

Sportsmen report ducks as numerous. 

Who pitched that tent on the Delta ? 

The ends are unusually dark this term. 

Winthrop advertises for a garc^on de cham- 
hre. 

Men of no musical tastes are complaining 
of pianos. 

'77 had printed ballots at their class elec- 
tion. Style ! 

Adjutant's orders are folded in the form of 
a cocked hat. 



92 



BOWDOIN OBIENT. 



As usual the Sophs were victorious in the 
foot-ball match. 

The captains of Go's A and D sport 
some swell blades. 

All the Societies have " swung out," even 
the staid Orthodox. 

Men who cut Sunday evening prayers are 
called Forest church devotees. 

Fine weather for riding. The drives in 
the suburbs are very attractive. 

Since Prof. C.'s little lecture, tobacco can 
be bought of '74 at ruinous prices. 

L. H. Kimball, '74, has returned, after an 
absence of three months in Europe. 

A member of '75 is arranging for a series 
of " hops " during the present term. 

A '77 man, disliking the term Freshman, 
speaks of his classmates as " new fellows." 

With a rope-pull, a hold-in, and the prob- 
ability of some cane " rushes,'' the next three 
weeks will be full of excitement for under- 
classmen. 

According to the " new tactics " every 
member of the college is required to purch.ase 
a uniform. Several men propose to leave 
town under a suspension of the rules. 

Prof. desires more uniformity in 

spittoons. Old hats, crayon boxes, and sheets 
of paper are good enough for every day, but 
before visitors they don't compare favorably 
with elegant cuspidores. 

A postal card, containing the following, 

was picked up on the Freshman recitation 

room floor this morning : — 

"Dear Father, — They came into our room — 
blotved out light — stood us on table — bad to scan 
Livy — had to spell three-syllabled words — hard 
ones — and I want you to come down Mondav. 

D— . 

Scene in the " court of inquiry." Baris- 
ter-in-chief, and cross-examiner (to Junior) 

/ 



— " Do you leave your door unlocked ? " Jun- 
ior (carelessly) — " Well — yes." Bar. — " Do 
you think any student would enter the room 
and take a pail of water therefrom ? " Jun- 
ior (right up — "brash") — " O, no." Bar. 

— "Why not ? " Junior — " Because J JiavnH 
any pail ! " Thanks — doesn't smoke — good 
evening. 

A Freshman has sent home some tin-tj'pes 
to be distributed among his former friends. 
They represent him as he appeared on the 
morning after his initiation. He stands erect, 
a Livy under one arm, the other resting on his 
musket, with bayonet fixed; a fatigue cap 
hangs over his ear, while upon the broad lap- 
pel of his new diagonal shines his society pin. 
In the letter which accompanies the pictures 
he is careful to inform his sister that the pink 
tinge on his cheek is wholly the work of the 
artist. 

Prior is a Junior, fond of wine and hospit- 
able withal. As he lay on his sofa the other 
evening, after frequent visits to his sideboard, 
the following colloquy occurred. Prior (with 
closed eyes, and rubbing his unshaven chin 
across his shirt-front) — "I (hie) say, chum, 
what's Joe Jefferson's name (hie)?" Chiun 
(sharply) — " Why, Joe Jefferson, ain't it ? " 
Prior — " O yes (hie), I never could remem- 
ber names." And Prior opened his English 
Literature and fell asleep over the chapter on 
Dryden. 

Vapor has appeared at the club for the 
last three days with his linen covered with 
mildew. Vapor doesn't like to be " chinned " 
about it continually, so he has explained. It 
appears that Vapor's laundress had failed to 
acquaint her boy with the countersign ; that 
young man, failing to " cheek " it on the 
sentinel, and having an appointment with the 
end-woman's daughter, threw V.'s wash under 
the hedge where it remained several days. 
At last a timid corporal brought it in on the 
point of his bayonet, thinking it was some 



■k 



(^.cM^"^ 



.f 



ifhA 



i/y 



BOWDOIN OBIENT. 



93 



new kind of " soft-shell " which the " yaggers " 
had deposited there for distinctive purposes. 
Vapor thinks guard mounting is a farce. 



THE SOCIETY CAMPAIGN. 

Below we append the names of those, so 
far as we have been able to obtain them, who 
have been initiated into the Secret Societies 
this Fall : — 

A. A. i>. 

SOPHOMORES. 

•W. A. Rubiuson. 

FRESHMEN. 

E. Blake, G. A. IlDlbrook, 

N. C. lii-own, W. A. Sanboru, 

J. B. Cbapman, H. D. Wiggin. 



¥. Y. 



r. H. Dillingbam, 
C. Haningtou, 
F. J. Lyncle, 
F. A. Mitchell, 



F. M. Palmer, 
C. A. Perry, 
W. Perry, 
C. B. Seabury, 



A. K. E. 

JUNIORS. 

S. W. Wbitmoro. 

FRESHMEN. 

C. E. Cobb, C. W. Morrill, 

I). D. Oilman, 0. L. Nickerson, 

P. H. Iiigalls, K. E. Peary, 

0. M. Lord, AV. Steplieuson, 

G. L. Thompson. 

Z. >I'\ 



SOPnOMORES. 

Albert S(mies. 



A. J. Bolster, 
W. T. Cobb, 



D. B. Fuller, 
L. U. Keed, 



W. K. Williams. 
0. A. X. 

FRESHMEN. 

J. K. Green, E. C. Metcalf, 

W. C. Green, J. A. Koberts, 

S. A. Meloher, E. A. Scribner, 

L. A. Stanwood. 



BOATING MEETING. 

The Boating Association, on Monday, 
elected the following officers for the ensuing 
year: Commodore, C. H. Hunter; Vice Com- 
modore, G. F. Harriman ; Secretary, E. Gerry, 
Jr. ; Treasurer, F. R. Upton ; Executive Com- 
mittee, W. T. Goodale, C. F. KimbaU, W. H. 



Houlton. Remarks were made about sending 
a crew to the race next year, and it was the 
feeling of the meeting that a crew should be 
sent. A crew Avill go to work on the river 
this fall, so as to be prepared for the summer 
campaign. 



FRESHMAN OFFICERS. 

The following list of officers have been 
elected by the Freshman class, '77, of Bow- 
doin College, for the ensuing 3'ear: Presi- 
dent, Dwight Wiggin ; Vice President, F. H. 
Crocker ; Treasurer, "W. Cobb ; Secretary, J. 
K. Green; Orator, B. Fuller; Toast Master, 
Roberts; Prophet, H. Smith; Historian, E. 
Blake ; Poet, C. A. Perry ; Committee of 
Arrangements, Chas. Seabury 1st, R. Wil- 
liams 2d, W. C. Green 3d ; Committee on 
Odes, A. M. Sherman 1st, Sanborn 2d, Dun- 
bar 3d. 



At Oxford, some twenty years ago, a tutor 
of one of the colleges limped in his walk. 
Stopping one day last summer at a railway 
station, he was accosted by a well-known poli- 
tician, Avho recognized him and asked him if 

he Avas not the chaplain of College at 

such a time, naming the year. The doctor 
replied that he was. " I was there,'' said the 
interrogator, "and knew you by 3'our limp." 
" Well," said the doctor, " it seems my limp- 
ing made a greater impression than my preach- 
ing." " Ah, doctor," Avas the reply, with 
ready wit, " it is the highest compliment Ave 
can pay a minister to say that he is knoAvn by 
his walk better than by his conversation." 

Harvard College has received more than 
four hundred applications for admission to its 
Freshman class — a fact entirely without pre- 
cedent in the educational history of the 
country. A dozen years ago all the under- 
graduates in the four classes at Harvard 
hardly exceeded the number mentioned. — 
Teacher'' s Record. 



94 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



ALUMNJ RECORD. 



[We earnestly request contributions for this 
department from tlie Alumni and friends of the 
College.] 

'17. — John Widgery died in Portland, 
August 2d. He was a member of the Cum- 
berland Bar at the time of his death. He 
had been clerk of the Mississippi House of 
Representatives, and also Mayor of Little 
Rock, Arkansas. He resided in St. Louis for 
many years. 

'27. — Hon. John P. Hale who was thought 
to be at the point of death, a fortnight since, 
is now so much improved that his friends an- 
ticipate his recovery. 

'44 — Joseph Titcomb of Kennebunk, was, 
at the last meeting of the Boards, elected 
Treasm-er of the College. He was the Dem- 
ocratic nominee this year for Governor. 

'49. — Wm. Hobson is to be found as 
Attorney and Counsellor at Law, at 35 Old 
State House, Boston, having formed a partner- 
ship with Mr. James Pickering. 

'65. — Rev. J. E. Fullerton, formerly of 
Bath, has accepted a call to the Congregational 
church in Southbridge, Mass. 

'66. — Dr. Frederick H. Gerrish has ac- 
cepted a call to lecture at the University of 
Michigan, upon Materia Medica, the chair of 
which he will still continue to hold here. 

'69. — Willard H. Perley was drowned in 
Lake Huron, on his passage to Detroit, a few 
days since. He was formerly a law student 
in the office of Howard & Cleaves, in Port- 
land. At the time of his death he was prac- 
ticing his profession in Detroit. 

'70. — Burdus R. Melcher has resigned his 
position as Instructor in Greek at this Col- 
lege, and has accepted a call to the Saco High 
School. 

'70. — Torrey and Oakes have received 
positions at Bellevue Hospital. 

'71. — N. F. Curtis lately received his de- 
gree of M.D., from the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons. 



'73 — F. A. Mitchell has received the ap- 
pointment of Ambulance Surgeon at Bellevue 
Hospital. 

THE CLASS OF 1878. 

Loren F. Berry is principal of the Bruns- 
wick High School. 

Wm. A. Blake is reading law in Bangor. 

J. M. Boothby is in Brunswick. 

Hervey W". Chapman has the High School 
in Kennebunk. 

N. D. A. Clarke is teaching in Boothbay. 

E. J. Cram is teaching at Winthrop. 
J. A. Cram is teaching at Wells. 

A. L. Crocker intends entering the Ma- 
chine Shop of the Saco Water Company. 

B. T. Deering 

I. L. Elder is teaching at Orrington. 
J. F. Elliot is first Assistant in Lawrence 
Academy, at Groton, Mass. 
A. C. Fairbanks 
W. G. Fassett is in Portland. 

F. A. Floyd is teaching the High School 
at Brewer. 

R. E. Gould goes into business in Bidde- 
ford. 

F. M. Hatch will studj^ law in Portsmouth, 
N. H. 

A. E. Herrick is at " Little Blue." 
A. G. Ladd is at Groveton, N. H. 
J. W. Lowell is studying theology at Au- 
dover. 

A. F. Moulton is Tutor at Bowdoin. 

G. S. Mower is at Newberry, S. C. 

A. F. Richardson is still teaching at Bridg- 
ton Academy. 

D. A. Robinson is in Bangor. 
F. C. Robinson is in Bangor. 

C. C. Sampson is in Harrison. 

D. W. Snow is in Portland. 

C. M. Walker has a school at Naper City, 
Cal., at a salary of $1500 in gold. 

F. S. Waterhouse is studying law with 
Hon. T. B. Reed in Portland. 

F. E. Whitney has the High School at 
Dedham, Mass. 



BOWDOm ORIENT. 



95 



F. A. Wilson has the Fryeburg' Academy. 

A. P. Wiswell is studying law with his 
father in Ellsworth. 

E. H. Deering of Portland, Me., has been 
engaged as teacher of Greek in Nichols Acad- 
emy, Dudley. 

Speaking of the dying out of General 
Societies in Eastern colleges, the Volante of- 
fers some remarks worthy of consideration, 
though we do not wholly agree with the con- 
clusions : — 

" No Greek society, no local affair," it says, 
" has occasioned this want of interest in our 
societies. The national taste for the conver- 
sational style of oratory has done the Avork — 
done it, we fear, only too eft'ectually. Able 
men who belong to no secret organizations are 
no more regular in their attendance upon the 
open societies than the Greek society men. 
All believe the best way to acquire the easy 
grace of the conversational school is by spend- 
ing more time in social circles ; and there is 
where you can generally find them on society- 
night. 

" The truth is, public speaking is no longer 
as popular as in former times. The jjcn has 
undermined the rostrum, and though you may 
hear men talk of republican eloquence, it is a 
thing of the past. The tremendous develop- 
ment of the press during the last twenty-five 
years is the real cause of this revolution in 
oratory. During that period there has been 
a silent but a mighty struggle between these 
two agencies in moulding public opinion. The 
press is victorious. The old school of oratory 
has been stripped both of its fustian and its 
thrilling earnestness. The new school boasts 
of nothing but a harmless elegance. The 
press has destroyed the old and is devom-ing 
the new school. Public speaking will ere 
long be numbered among the lost arts." 



A Scotch church having bought an au- 
tomaton organ, there being no organist to be 
found near, started it on the time of Dundee, 
on Sunday. The clerk being unable to stop 
it, when it was set a-going it played that 
cheerful tune just eighty-seven times before 
it stopped. 



TIME TABLE. 
Trains leave Brunswick for — 

Augusta — 8.25 A.M.; 2.40 and 6.55 p.m. ; 1.55 

A.M. (Pull.) 
Bangor — 2.40 P.M. ; 1.55 a.m. (Pull.) 
Bath — 7.40 and 8.25 a.m. ; 1.20, 2.40, 4.50 and 

6.55 P.M. 
Boston — 7.35 A.M.; 1.20 and 4.40p.m.; 12 M. 

(Pull.) 
Farmington — 2.40 p.m. 
Lewiston — 7.40 a.m. ; 2.40 and 6.55 p.m. 
Portland — 7.35 A.M.; 1.20 and 4.40 P.M. ; 12 m. 

(Pull.) 
Waterville — 2.40 p.m. ; 1.55 a.m. (Pull.) 



BUSINESS CARDS. 

S TROUT & HOLMES, 
Counselors at Law, 
No. 88 Middle Street (Canal Bank Building), PORTLAND, ME. 

A. A. STROUT. GEO. F. HOLMES C66). 

JOSEPH A. LOCKE (Bowdoin, '65), Attorney and Counsellor at Law, 
74 Middle Street, cor. Exchange Street, POllTLAND. 



JOSIAH n. DRUMMOND (Colby, '46) CounseUor at Law, 100 Exchange 
street, PORTLAND. 

NOYES, HOLMES & COMPANY, 

219 Washhigton St. and 10 Bromfleld St., 
BOSTON, MASS. 

PUBLISHERS AND BOOKSELLEES, 

AND BETAIL 



STATIONERS, 



AU kinds of COLLEGE AND SCHOOL TEXT BOOKS, and STANDARD 
AND MISCELLANEOUS LITERATURE, supplied at 

LOW PRICES. 

Orders by Mail or Express will receive prompt and careful attention. 
These books may be obtained through J. P. BICKFORD, Agent, No. 21 
Maine Hall. 



DIVINITY SCHOOL OF HAEVAED UNIVEESITY 

This School is open to persons of al! denominations. Pecuniary aid la 
afforded to those who are needy and deserving. 
The next academic year will begin 

SEPTEMBER 26th. 

Further information will be given on application to 

Prof. OLIVER STEARNS, D.D., 
Or Prof. E. J. YOUNG, 

Caubridgb, MAS3. 



96 



BOWBOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Classical Department. 

TERMS OF ADMISSION. 

Candidates for admission into the Freshman Class are examined as fol- 

OWS : — 

Harkness's Latin Grammar, including Prosody} Parts I. and 11. Hark- 
nes8*a Introduction to Latin Prose Composition; VirgU, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the ^neid; Cicero's Select Orations; Sallust. 

Hadlej's or Goodwin's Greek Grammar; Goodwin's Greek Reader; or 
Xenophon's Anabasis, 4 books, and Homer's Iliad, 2 books. 

Arithmetic; Algebra, to equations of the second degree; Davies's 
Legendre's Geometry, first and third books. 

£nglish GrammEir; Ancient and Modern Geography, 



Scientific Department. 

TERMS OF ADMISSION. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the following subjects : — 
itfa/Aema(ics— Arithmetic, includmg Common and Decimal Frac- 
tious. Interest, and Square Root; Algebra, to Equations of the 
Second Degree; Geomtitry, Books I. and III. of Davies^s !«- 
gendre. 
Geography — Political Geography, and simple elements of Astrono- 
mical and Physical Geography. 
History — L::ading facts ia general History, and especially in Ameri- 
ca q History. 
Latin — Allen's Latin Grammar, or the equivalent. 
English— The examination will consist in 1st, Reading aloud a pas- 
sage from some standard author, with explanations of gram- 
matical construction, and definition and derivation of words; 2d, 
Writing a few sentences in English, on some familiar subject, 
reference being had to spelling and punctuation as well as to 
composition; 3d Correction^ of ungrammatical sentences com- 
posed for the purpose. 
All candidates for admission must produce certificates of their good 
moral character. 

The time for admission is the Friday after Commencement, and the 
first Thursday of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants may be 
examined at other times. 



Courses of Study. 

The regular course of Instruction is that commended by the leading 
colleges of the country as eminently adapted^to secure liberal culture. 

THE SCIENTIFIC COURSE 

has been recently organized. Thirty-four students have already entered, — 
a fact which indicates that the College has been successful in its effort to 
meet the demand for a liberal course of study which shall at the same 
time look towards the actual uses and applicatioiM of knowledge. 

The studies pursued in this course are comprised in the following: — 
Languages — English one year, and optional two ; Latin one year* 
optional three ; French one year, optional three ; German one 
year, optional two ; Spanish, Italian, Swedish, Anglo-Saxon, one 
year. 
Mathematics — Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, Mensuration, 
Spherical Trigonometry, Analytical Geometry ; Differential and 
Integral Calculus, with the application of these to Surveying, 
Navigation, Projections, Dialling, Levelling, Astronomy, Mechan- 
ics, Topographical and Hydrographical Engineering. 
Natural History — Geology, Mineralogy, Botany, Zoology, with their 
relations to the Industrial Arts. 



Natural Philosophy — Mechanics, Hydrodynamics, Pneumatics, 
Optics, Astronomy, Light, Heat, Electricity, &c. 

Chemistry — In all its branches and applications. 

History and Political Science — General, Medieval and Modem His- 
tory, Politiciil Economy, General Principles of Iaw, Interna- 
ti:>nal Law, Law of Evidence, Constitution of United States, 
Theory of Government, American Law. 

Philosophy — Rhetoric, Logic, Psychology, Metaphysics, Evidences 
of Natural and Revealed Religion, Ethics, Esthetics. 

The studies of the first two years are common throughout the Depart- 
ment and are intended to lay a broad and substantial foundation for all 
branches of subsequent study. In the last two years the studies are 
arranged in distinct courses, in accordance with certain leading objects : a 
general scientific culture, or special technical skill. Attention is particu- 
larly invited to the facilities offered for the thorough study of Civil Engi 
neering. 



A POST-GRADUATE COURSE 



of two years is also commenced, in which Instruction will be given in 
he following schools: — 

I. Letters — Comprising Languages, Ancient and Modern (includ- 
ing the Oriental) with their literatures; Philology; Rhetoric; 
Logic; History-; Elocution; the Fine Arts. This leads to the 
degree of Master of Arts. 

n. Science — Advanced Mathematics, Physics, Natural History and 
Chemistry, in their uses and applications. This leads to the 
degree of Doctor of Science. 

m. Philosophy — Comprising the above, considered in their reasons 
and relations ; Psychology, Metaphysics, Ethics, Esthetics ; Poli- 
tics ; Theory of Government, Constitutional History, Principles 
of Law, International Law. Leading to the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy. 

rv. Medicine — ^The Medical School of Maine. Degree, — M. D. 

Students who are not graduates will be received on satisfactory evi- 
dence of proficiency in study which will enable them to profit by this 
Course. 

Much and careful attention is given to Physical Culture under the train 
ngof accomplished Instructors. The Gymnasium is well provided with 
approved apparatus, and the opportunities for Military drill and discipline 
are of the very best. 

It is but just to say that good morals and manliness are distinguishing 
features of college life at Bowdoin. 

The Library of Bowdoin is one of rare value, and the choicest works 
are constantly added. The Gallery of Paintings is well known to be one o 
the most remarkable in the country. The Cabinet and apparatus are 
ample for their purpose. 

The annual expenses are, for tuition, &c., $90. Board $2.50 and $4.00 
a week. Pecuniary assistance, from the income of thirty scholarships and 
various other benefactions, is rendered to those who are unable fully to 
meet their expenses otherwise. 

Commencement July XOth. Examination for admission July 12th and 
Aug. 28th, at 9 a.m. 

First term begins Aug. 28th, at evening. 

Every encouragement will be given to persons who desire to pursue 
any study taught in the College. 

The town of Brunswick, situated on tide water — the Androscoggin River 
on one side and the Ocean on the other ; ahready a seat of various manu- 
factures and destined to become one of the principal railroad centres of the 
State, easy also of access from all quarters, — presents an excellent locaUty 
for scientific as well as literary pursuits, while the facilities afforded by 
Bowdoin College, its Libraries, Galleries of Art, Cabinets, Scientific Col- 
lections, Laboratories, and Apparatus, offer great inducements to tlie ear- 
nest student of the Useful and Liberal Arts 



Vol. III. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, OCTOBER 15, 1873. 



No. 9. 



Hon. EDW. EMERSON BOURNE, LL.D. 

Br Peof. a. S. Packaed. 

An alumnus of the class of 1816, and a 
Trustee of the College, died in Kennebunk 
Sept. 23. It is fitting that the Orient should 
contain a sketch of his life and character. 
He was the second son of John and Elizabeth 
Bourne of Kennebunk ; was fitted for college 
at Berwick Academy ; immediately after grad- 
uating entered upon the study of law in the 
office of the late George W. Wallingford, 
(Ilarv. 1795) ; was admitted to the practice 
1819, opened an office in Albion, Kennebec 
Co. ; after a few months removed to York, 
and then, on the election of Hon. Joseph 
Dane to Congress, at the suggestion of Mr. 
Dane, returned to his native town, which was 
his home during the remainder of his life. 
Devoting himself to his profession he became 
prominent and successful. He received the 
appointment of County Attorney from Gov. 
Kent in 1838, and a second time in 1840. In 
1856 the office of Judge of Probate having 
become elective, he was chosen to that posi- 
tion which he held sixteen j'ears, discharging 
the duties to the entire satisfaction of all who 
appeared before his court. On resigning his 
office, in consequence of increasing bodily 
infirmity, he received a cordial and graceful 
tribute from his brethren of the profession, to 
his abilitj'', uprightness, unfailing courtesy and 
humane consideration and sympathy for those 
whose rights were committed to his charge. 
At one time a vacancy having occurred on the 
bench of the Supreme Court of the State, his 
name was prominent for the place ; but he 
discouraged the appointment. 

Of a truly public spirit. Judge Bourne 
identified himself readily with the interests 



of his town. He sympathized strongly with 
the efforts in the cause of temperance, both 
in public and more private ways. From early 
manhood he Avas zealous in promoting the 
interests of the religious society (Unitarian) 
with which he was connected, and for forty 
years was the efiicient superintendent of its 
Sabbath school. In lectures to the members 
of this school he began the work which occu- 
pied his spare hours during his later years, a 
history of Wells. For five years he was on 
the board of Selectmen, represented his town 
in five successive sessions of the Legislature 
of the State, and in other ways received proofs 
of the respect and confidence of his fellow citi- 
zens. Though always taking a lively interest 
in public affairs, and decided and ardent in his 
political opinions, he never aspired after, nor 
held, political offices. 

Judge Bourne had a strong bias for histor- 
ical inquiry. For nearly forty years he was a 
member of the Maine Historical Society, con- 
tributing valuable papers at its meetings, and 
for nine years was its President, succeeding 
Hon. William Willis in that office. No one, 
probably, was so familiar with the history of 
the southern border of the State ; its public 
and private sources of historic information he 
had thoroughly explored. Reference has al- 
ready been made to the history of Wells, of 
Avhich Kennebunk once formed a portion. 
This was the work, as has been said, of the 
days and hours he could spare from profes- 
sional duties. He had nearly completed this 
labor of years. Indeed, he declared a day or 
two before his departure that three days would 
finish it. It is hoped that it may be given to 
the press, and we are confident that the thor- 
oughness of his work will make it a highly 



BOWB OIN ORIENT. 



valuable contribution to our local history. But 
his inquiries had embraced all points touching 
the general history and early colonization of 
our coast. His address delivered at Bath in 
commemoration of the two hundred and fifty- 
seventh anniversary of the settlement at the 
mouth of the Kennebec, afforded proof of 
extensive and accurate research. He was a 
corresponding member of the New England 
Historical and Genealogical Society, and con- 
tributed papers to its Register as also to the 
Historical Magazine. 

Judge Bourne was a man of great indus- 
try and activity of mind, of a truly pubhc 
spirit, generous, genial, hospitable, liberal to 
the poor and to good objects, of a high tone 
of character, and of a sincere and earnest 
religious spirit. He was for several years a 
Trustee of his Alma Mater, and received her 
highest academic honor. 

He had suffered from infirm health for 
three or four years. He joined the Scientific 
Association in the excursion to Bartlett, . N. 
H., during its recent meeting at Portland, and 
the effort proved too much for his strength. 
His disease, which was of the heart, renewed 
its violence, and after weeks of severe suffer- 
ing, in full and triumphant Christian hope, he 
died. His funeral was attended by several of 
his legal brethren, by a representation from 
the Maine Historical Society and the College, 
and a large concourse of relatives and friends. 
The village stores were closed during the 
funeral solemnities, and every mark of respect 
was shown to the memory of a beloved and 
honored citizen. 



INCIDENTS FROM GERMAN UNIVER- 
SITY LIFE. 
By Peofessoe Caemichael. 
In these days of scientific advancement, 
the greatest era of discovery in the Avorld's 
history, when revelations of distant worlds 
and distant times, the unfolding secrets of 



material, force, and fife, facts more strange 
and striking than the tales of fiction, are so 
frequent that only the thorough student may 
hope to keep abreast with them, it is natural 
to inquire into their origin. 

Where are the mines of scientific truth, and 
who were the fortunate finders of the golden 
nuggets, star analysis, organic synthesis, and 
the multitude of exact observations which con- 
stitute the wealth of modern science ? 

It is not now our intention to inquire into 
the causes of the sterility of America and the 
fruitfulness of Germany in scientific research. 
Only a few facts of near or remote bearing 
upon this subject will be presented. 

It is a notorious fact that our country is, 
m this respect, the antipode of Germany 
among civilized nations. With all our boasted 
ingenuity, it must be confessed that the prin- 
ciples of our machines and manufactures are 
the product of foreign thought. America is 
famous for the application of principles, but 
in Germany the discovery of them is as regu- 
lar and certain an occupation as the digging 
of ore or the planting of grain. It is among 
German students we must look for the ma- 
terial from which the ranks of German scholars 
are recruited, and yet a hasty consideration of 
these would show them to be the last from 
whom an addition to the store of human 
knowledge might be expected. 

As it is difficult to describe to a German 
an American college, from the lack of such 
institutions upon the continent, so is it nearly 
impossible to convey to an American an ade- 
quate conception of a European University. 

Up to his sixteenth or seventeenth year, 
the German lad attends the Gymnasium. 
Here the government is rigorous and exacting. 
The hours and courses of study are prescribed, 
and the vices and peccadilloes, which will not 
only be winked at, but even encouraged dur- 
ing his university career, are sternly prohibited. 
The youth early learns that, in conversation 
and in society, he is to remain in the back- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



99 



ground. Even at this early stage, his train- 
ing is strikingly different from that of his 
American counterpart. Alas that that good 
old word education, implying the develop- 
ment of latent powers, should have come to 
such a bad end ! 

Facts discovered in some continental lab- 
oratory, and briefly announced by their inves- 
tigators, are seized upon by ill-informed and 
unskillful translators, and then, most likely 
distorted by religious bigotry or popular igno- 
rance, are put in book form Ijy commercial 
speculators, and taught by country pedagogues 
whose oracular certitude is based upon the 
narrowness of their information. Thus it 
comes that liu'king errors and superstitions of 
ages, we hope passed forever, are still incul- 
cated and believed in, with the certainty of 
mathematical axioms. Incidentally this system 
begets a reliance upon ill-defined words with 
a lack of self-reliance and philosophical candor. 

How often is the irrefutable argument ad- 
vanced, " It says so in the book." How 
often is the advice of Mephistopheles ac- 
cepted. 

Pupil — " You have increased my distaste 
for this [philosophy]. I should Uke quite 
well to study theology." Mephistopheles — " I 
would not lead you astray in respect to this 
science, it is so difficult to avoid the false 
path, there lies in it so much concealed pois- 
on, and from medicine it is so difficult to dis- 
tinguish. It is best also here if you only 
listen to one and swear to the master's words, 
then you go securely through the gate to the 
temple of wisdom." Pupil — " Still, there must 
be some meaning connected with the word." 
Mephistopheles — " Very well ; but you need 
not trouble yourself too much about that; 
even when there is a lack of meaning a word 
va&Y serve a good turn. You can contend 
excellently with words; you can prepare a 
system with words ; your faith can rest 
excellently upon Avords ; and from words can- 
not an iota be taken away." 



The German pupil is early taught that the 
dictum of book or teacher is but tentative, 
that fallibilit}^ rests upon man and his works, 
and nature alone may speak with authority. 
Human authorities are not indeed to be re- 
jected, but to be tested and verified, and to be 
accepted until proved to be fallacious. Thus 
it is that text-books are in a great measure 
supplanted in German schools by ' talks' with 
the teacher. On fair holidays and Sundays 
troups of gymnasial pupils may be seen sally- 
ing out into the country with their green 
specimen boxes on their backs, frequently 
accompanied by their teachers, counting the 
parts of flowers and the legs of insects, col- 
lecting every thing of interest as thej- go. 
Thus the youth enters the University with 
trained e3'es and ears. 

The eyes and ears of the American stu- 
dent, we may possibly consider, in accordance 
with the Darwinian theory, partially aborted 
by disuse. Let us take an an example. The 
instructors of Astronomy, Zoology, Botany, 
and Geolog3% dwell fondl^^ upon the composi- 
tion of the atmosphere, and point out sev- 
erally its beautiful adaptation to vegetable 
and animal life, and its relation to the life of 
distant times and distant worlds. Yet the 
average student frequently runs this gauntlet 
with such success that, though he confesses 
to a lurking suspicion that oxj'gen is alwaj's 
present, yet he would prefer not to be pressed 
as to the remainder of its constituents. 

A consideration of the methods of linguis- 
tic instruction in the two countries would 
afford nearly an equal contrast. 

In the German schools ancient and modern 
languages arc very early taught by what might 
be called a natural method — by practice in 
speaking. As a consequence the liberally 
educated German is frequently in a condition 
to speak French and English fluently, and to 
understand with facility written or spoken 
Greek and Latin. As in the case of the writer, 
we presume many of our graduates, some years 



100 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



out of colleges, retain .a lively sense of the 
rules and exceptions of the ancient languages, 
but we fear they are much in the state of the 
rule once stated for testing the worth of eggs, 
" If you place them in Avater the good ones 
wiU either sink or swim, but I cannot for the 
life of me remember which." 

We do not mean to decry the methods now 
used, nor do we pretend to have fairly stated 
the case, for we presume they produce the 
training of mind intended, but they are very 
different, and their results are equally so. We 
learn, too, that methods have much improved 
since our day, and that rules are becoming 
mere generalizations, founded upon numerous 
examples, to aid the memory rather than the ab- 
stract representation of philological principles. 

After leaving the Gymnasium the young 
student must serve two years in the army, but 
here a little option is allowed him ; he may 
enter the army before his university career or 
after it. As a soldier, by a somewhat fi-ee use 
of language, he is called a volunteer. 

Though a man is thus robbed of two of 
the choicest years of his life, we cannot recall 
anj'- case of grumbling. It is simply a duty, 
a necessity, an offering of the patriotism which 
has been instilled from the earliest years, and 
there is no room for discussion. This period 
of life spent in camp routine is not entirely 
lost, for there is acquired a manly, erect form 
and a rugged constitution. 

It would be interesting to know if military 
discipline Avould be endured with the same 
complacency if it were reduced to the mini- 
mum compatible with a successful pursuit of 
knowledge, but we fear according to well- 
known psychological principles that neither its 
hygienic or patriotic advantages would save it 
from general disfavor. We have, at this point, 
just reached the subject with which we started, 
and propose, if we are allotted space, to con- 
sider the virtues and the follies of the German 
student, with an account of the university 
prison and the practice of duelling. 



[COMSItJNICATIOSr.] 

The conduct of the student is necessarily 
governed by the teacher from the teacher's 
point of view, and it is that fact only which 
justifies us in advancing a counter claim on 
our side and criticising the teacher from the 
student's point of view. And we are not cer- 
tain but that this is the proper standpoint 
after all, since the teacher's aim ever is, or 
should be, the student's profit. 

Teachers are not all alike : different char- 
acters have different modes of development ; 
different departments of knowledge require 
different methods of instruction ; different 
classes need to be dealt with in different ways. 
But notwithstanding these differences there 
are some leading principles to be adopted, 
some great defects to be guarded against in 
every case we can conceive of. 

Among the many different methods of the 
many different teachers, we have noticed two 
great heads under which they seem to class 
themselves, two widely dissimilar ideas vari- 
ous instructors have of the scoiDe of the reci- 
tation, two leading plans on which they seem 
to conduct them. Some teachers regard a 
recitation as merely an examination, others 
look upon it as the development and exposi- 
tion of the lesson already supposed to be 
learned. Without at present discussing the 
merits of the two views let us look at two 
pictures. 

A class is assembled in the recitation room, 
hurriedly and anxiously taking a last look at 
the appointed lesson. With a quick, martial 
step the stern, starch Professor enters the 
room, glancing impatiently around as though 
provoked that he should have been kept so 
long from his victims. With eyes fiercely 
turned upon those who seek to hide themselves 
from the coming storm by getting excused, he 
submits reluctantly to this law of custom. 
Right before him is a dull youth, and dullest 
by far in this particular branch, hurriedly 
memorizing the first paragraph, under the ter- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



101 



lible presentiment that he shall be " the first 
man up." The teacher calls iip his class by 
lot, so that no one may have the slightest idea 
when his turn will come, or what subject he 
will have to discuss, and may recite in the 
very poorest possible manner. The teacher's 
face is almost lighted by a smile as he reads 
the first name. Jones ! is the missive his lips 
send out, short but terrible as a death sentence 
to one heart. The boy rises; his presenti- 
ment was right ; the fii'st paragraph is right 
on his lips, when with a monstrous bound the 
Professor jumps to the very last page of the 
lesson, " The relation of the Parallax to the 
determination of the distances of the stars." 
The boy shudders; he had no idea there were 
such fearful words in the lesson. But he 
begins and once begun stammers on, his mind 
filled with some faint conception of the topic 
he is discussing, but mingling almost at every 
sentence some fragments of that first para- 
graph, and hopelessly reflecting how much 
better he could recite on this topic had all 
those preceding pages been talked of and 
explained. He stops and looks and waits, 
but not a comment escapes the lips of the 
immovable Professor. 

" I wonder if that is right. I didn't under- 
stand what the book said, nor what I said 
myself very well. Fd like to know about it." 
But probably he never will know. " The 
effect of the centrifugal and centripetal forces 
on the eccentricity of planetary orbits." Hor- 
rors ! what does he mean ? The boy studies 
the chemical composition of the ceiling. The 
Professor smiles as he sees the noose tighten- 
ing and the victim sinking. But he is not yet 
done. Still more he mercilessly plies the boy 
with questions taken here and there from every 
part of the lesson, couched in the most obscui'e 
and technical language, twisted and distorted 
in every shape and manner possible, until the 
dizzy youth falls upon his seat wondering at 
the erudition of the teacher and amazed at 
his own stupidity, with all his own ideas, good 



or bad, scattered to the winds, and not a new 
one added in their place. And so the recita- 
tion proceeds, the teacher doing his utmost to 
mislead and m3'stify and entrap the student, 
the latter, acting on the defensive, compelled 
to resort to the same means against the teacher. 

'Tis another room, another class, another 
teacher. 'Tis a cheery, patient, warm-hearted 
Professor this time, gladly reaching a helping 
hand to the dullest, proudly urging on the 
most talented, carefully elucidating every point 
as he goes on, varying the monotony of ques- 
tioning with explanations and observations, 
anecdote and information of every sort, trying 
to interest and profit as well as examine and 
rank his pupils. 'Tis an attentive, interested 
and intelligent class this time, reaping a good 
harvest of knowledge, not only from text book 
but from teacher and recitation. 

Which is the best way? There can be 
but one answer. We all know what is right 
in others, though we too often mistake it ui our- 
selves. There is a principle that we are at 
least seeking to develop by these illustrations 
which we believe in some cases needs to be 
studied and applied. The province of the 
teacher is not to examine but to instruct. 

We know the ranking system in our col- 
leges makes it necessary to combine something 
of the former with the latter, but we do not 
believe ranking is half so hard as some teach- 
ers make it. One would suppose from obser- 
vations taken in some recitations that the 
sole object of a college course Avas to ascer- 
tain the exact gradation in talent and scholar- 
ship of the young men of oiu- country, and 
apportion certain honors according to the 
gradation thus ascertained. If the ranking 
system necessitated this method of conducting 
recitations we would say let us put an end to 
ranking forever. We are glad that the great 
majority of teachers are free from this error, 
and hope that the remainder Avill speedily 
correct what we believe to be a grievous 
fault. Student. 



102 



BOfVDOm ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PUBLISHED EVEET ALTERNATE "WEDNESDAY DUE- 
ING THE COLLEGIATE YEAR AT 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE, 
By the Class of 1874. 

EDITORS. 

S. V. Cole, L. H. Kimball, 

W. T. GooDALE, D. 0. S. Lo-well, 

r. W. Hattthorne, F. K. Wheeler, 

H. K. White. 

Terms — $2 00 a year in advance; single copies, 
15 cents. 

Address communications to Bo"wdoin Orient, 
Brunswick, Maine. 

For sale at 7 Appleton Hall, Bowdoiu College. 
Also by J. Griffin and B. G. Dennison, Brunswick ; 
and A. Williams & Co., 135 Washington St., Boston. 



CONTENTS. 
Vol. III., No. 9. — Oct. 15, 1873. 

Hon. Edw. Emerson Bourne 97 

Incidents from German University Life 98 

Communication 100 

Our Beading Boom 102 

Local 103 

Editors' Book Table 105 

Dr. Woods's Library 107 



(It is a matter of absolute necessity that 
all unpaid subscriptions should be settled 
immediatelj''. Our. printers' bills become 
due at the close of each month, and we rely 
on our subscriptions to meet them. Let" 
every one, then, who is indebted attend to 
this matter at once. 



:) 



Since our last issue it has been represented 
to us that wrong inferences might be drawn 
from an article that appeared in it as to the 
kind and cost of the uniform which students 



are required to purchase. Li order to correct 
any such inferences, if we have given rise to 
them, we give the facts. The uniform con- 
sists of a blue flannel blouse, a forage cap, 
Avhite belt and cross. The entire cost will be 
$5.60. The old gray uniform, worn by about 
one-third of the cadets, costs about $30. 



OUE READING EOOM. 

What an incalculable blessing it is to have 
a good reading room ! We don't mean one 
of your shabby one-horse concerns that you 
find in a country academy, but a real first- 
class college reading room, fitted with all the 
modern improvements, stocked Avith all the 
leading journals and choicest magazines of the 
day, regularly and promptly filed, carefully 
and systematically kept in their proper places, 
jealously guarded from mutilation and pillage ; 
a room where smoking, and loud talking, and 
scuffling are sternly ke^Dt at a distance ; where 
the regulations of the association even are 
posted up in conspicuous places, so that no 
one may have the audacity to disobey them ; 
a room which is always kept nicely warmed, 
and in the evening well lighted ; whose quiet 
and comfort ever stretch out an inviting hand 
to the literary-minded student; where on a 
stormy, blustering night, you may go and 
have a real cosey, pleasant, profitable time 
over the pages of the last Harper or Atlantic. 
Why, students of Bowdoin College, do you 
reahze it, or don't you ever go in and behold 
the privileges you may enjoy ? If you never 
have gone in to behold don't ever do it, but 
stay away, and rest on in the blissful assur- 
ance that just such an ideal reading room as 
we have described awaits your pleasure at 
any moment. But must we who patronize 
the reading room submit any longer to the 
outrageous manner in which it is conducted ? 
We have been talking and scolding for years ; 
but all our complaint has done little more 
than heap up the abuses. We know long- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



103 



continued wrongs beget forbearance, and we 
suppose this must account for the long-suffer- 
ing we have exhibited. We believe we need 
no longer submit to it — thatsomething can and 
must be done. Yes, everybody will smile at our 
earnestness and evident inexperience. But 
what is there incurable, we would ask, about 
any of the abuses that make our reading 
room an actual discredit to the College and 
her students ? Is that ideal establishment we 
pictured at the beginning absolutely outside 
the range of possibility ? 

Do the students understand what they are 
doing to maintain the institution ? They are 
paying out three hundred dollars every year 
for its support. They have a regularly organ- 
ized association and regularly elected officers, 
a committee who are apparently willing 
enough to assume their trust. They employ 
a student to bring up and hie the papers daily. 
They have a convenient room, small to be sure, 
but which might be nicely fitted -ap (and 
it is rumored that a new room is to be pro- 
vided in the chapel building), and what is 
the result of all this ? A reading room, we 
repeat, that is an actual discredit to all con- 
cerned in it. We believe this need not be. 

In the first place, if we .are to have the 
new room, let us have it at once, and inaugu- 
rate all the reforms in our new quarters. The 
room will be admirably situated, not so con- 
venient and easy of access, but removed from 
the bustle and noise to Avhich the other is sub- 
jected. In fact the latter has become a mere 
loafing-room for disorderly students, and those 
who go to read are completely outnumbered 
and vanquished. Can't we have a meeting of 
the Association to appoint a committee to 
effect that removal at once, or will the stand- 
ing committee secure it, if it is possible ? We 
suppose the matter is really in the hands of 
the President, and we doubt not a mere re- 
quest would be sufficient to secure his consent 
and co-operation. We deem this the most 
important step ui the reformation we propose. 



Again, we would like to know whether, 
and, if it is just, how that three hundred dol- 
lars is eaten up every year? Did such a 
thing as a report from its committee ever 
suggest itself to the Association ? Of course 
they are not personally responsible, for, as we 
understand it, the money is in the hands of 
the Treasurer, but they should be held ac- 
countable for its entire disbursement in some 
way. Again, we would ask, do the finances 
of the institution warrant any outlay in kero- 
sene oil and lamp chimnej^s, or is it deemed 
best that the students should not patronize 
the reading room in the evening ? 

Order and cleanliness ought to be guaran- 
teed by the common decency and sense of 
propriety of students who visit the room, 
but we are sorry to say this is not the case. 
Some energetic means must be taken to en- 
force the rules which look down so impotently 
from the walls. 

If nothing else can be done, we can, as a 
last resort, appoint a vigilance committee, 
whose special duty it shall be to maintain 
quiet in the room and report delinquents to 
the proper authorities. 

It should be a crime .against the laws of 
the College to violate the rules of decency and 
abuse the rights of property, as is done every 
day right before our eyes. 

It may be called a trifling matter, but 
Avhen it is carried on j^ear after year to the 
annoyance and almost persecution of those 
who desire to profit by the reading room, it 
becomes a matter of serious concern. We 
hope our appeal will not be unheeded. 



It is a singular coincidence that, at the 
present time, the pins of three out of the five 
secret societies are draped in mourning. 
Alpha Delta Phi mourns the death of W. H. 
Perley, class '69 ; Delta Kappa Epsilon, the 
death of L. Lothrop, '69 ; and Theta Delta 
Chi, the death of G. E. Smith, '75. 



104 



BOWDOIN OEIENT. 



LOCAX. 

" War times" these ! 

" O -well, that's all right." 

The blouses have arrived at last — Jail 
Birds ! 

E. N. Merrill, '74, sailed for Europe, 
October 9. 

Some of the privates are alarmingly face- 
tious on the parade ground. 

" Who vrill be the next to leave us " is a 
matter of great interest to all. 

The Seniors are refreshing their reasoning 
powers with Butler's Analogy. 

The Precession of Equinoxes has proved 
a second '■'■pons asinorum'" to '74. 

In the absence of the Commodore of the 
Bowdoin Navy, who is the " boss ? " 

Jack has changed his tables from pocket 
to carom, and wishes the boys to patronize 
him as of yore. 

Friday afternoons are now spent in bur- 
nishing guns and equipments, preparatory to 
inspection drill. 

Owing to the scarcity of apples, the Apple- 
ton Cider Company has been obliged to sus- 
pend operations. 

The " Powers that be " have been enjoy- 
ing themselves of late, at their protracted 
evening sessions. 

That good and inoffensive member of '75, 
who would not kill a fly, has been summoned 
before the Inquisition, much to his astonish- 
ment. 

The thii'tieth annual convention of the 
Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity wiU be held 
with the Rho Chapter, at Lafayette College, 
Easton, Pennsylvania, on the 15 and 16th of 
October. The delegates from Bowdoin are 
W. T. Goodale and J. W. Pray. 



A Senior was duly initiated into Peucinia, 
at the last meeting. He has since been repeat- 
ing '■'■ pinos loquentes " with a peculiar signifi- 
cance. 

The Peucinian initiation took place Mon- 
day evening, October 6th. The '■'■pinos lo- 
quentes " were present in full force, and added 
much to the solemnities of the occasion. 

A petition has been in circulation among 
the many friends of the Rev. Mr. Taylor, in 
College, requesting that he reconsider his res- 
ignation as rector of the Episcopal Church. 

The campus has its " Frog Pond " at last. 
Two of the above mentioned individuals were, 
not long since, taken from the north end of 
Winthrop well in a condition " too numerous 
to mention." 

Bugle Election was held Friday, in Me- 
morial Hall. The following are the editors 
for the ensuing number : Senior editor, H. G. 
White ; Junior editors, G. R. Swasey, Wilson 
Nevins, C. W. HHl, C. L. Clark. 

The four companies are making rapid prog- 
ress under their efficient captains. It has been 
rumored that they march even better than the 
squad of commissioned and non-commisioned 
officers. Of course that cannot be so. 

Junior Class Officers : President, S. C. 
Whitmore ; Vice President, E. H. HaU ; Sec- 
retary, O. Pierce ; Treasurer, R. G. Stanwood; 
Orator, W. G. Hunton; Poet, E. H. Noj^es; 
Prophet, B. W. Hewes, Historian, H. R. True; 
Committee of Arrangements, Briggs, Upton, 
Rice. 

At a meeting of the Athenean Society, 
Thursday evening, October 2d, a goodly num- 
ber of promising Freshmen became the de- 
votees of the Goddess Athena. Remarks 
were made by those present, relative to the 
present prosperous condition of the society, 
and it seemed to be the general opinion that 
the literary meetings ought to be and would 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



105 



be carried on. W. Pulsifer was elected Sec- 
retary vice J. J. Bradley. 

A meeting of the Bowdoin Base-Ball As- 
sociation was held in the Senior Recitation 
Room, on the afternoon of Oct. 6th. Gerry, 
74, Vice President, presided. The Treasurer 
made his annual report, and the following offi- 
cers Avere then elected. President, E. Gerry, 
Jr., '74 ; Vice President, G. R. Swasey, '75 ; 
Secretary, F. C. Payson, '76 ; Treasurer, W. 
Alden, '76 ; Directors, Hunton, '75 ; Sanford, 
'76 ; Stephenson, '77. A committee was ap- 
pointed to select a College Nine. Briggs, '75, 
made some remarks relative to a game with 
the Bates Nine, and the Treasurer was 
instructed to raise money for that purpose. 
The Nine wUl sport some new uniforms. 

The annual "rope-pull" between the Soph- 
omores and Freshmen came off on the morn- 
ing of October 4th. There was the usual 
confusion in taking positions — excited Sophs, 
seizing the Freshmen end of the rope, and 
vice versa. The Umpii'e, Briggs, '75, finally 
reduced the contestants to order, and gave 
the word " pull ! " From the first it M-as evi- 
dent that the Sophomores were superior; 
they pulled uniformly and steadily, while '77 
swayed from side to side, and jerked the rope 
violently at intervals. One Freshman was 
seen wiping his eye glasses, another stopped 
to grind holes in the gravel as a brace for his 
feet, and a third tried the old trick of a " half- 
hitch " round the tree ; there was no one by 
to encourage them by crying " I'll cut it, I 
wUl," as in the days of the sympathetic Ban- 
yan. The " pull " lasted three miuutes, and 
was a clear victory for '76. 



Those Sophomores of Williams College 
who disregarded college regulations the other 
day, for the sake of performing escort duty 
to three of their classmates who were sus- 
pended for hazing, have come to their " sober 
second thought " and returned to their duties. 



EDITORS' BOOK TABLE. 



First Foue Books of the Axabasis of Xeno- 
PHOX, with Notes, a Map of the Espedition, and 
a Complete Yocabulary. By Asahael C. Ken- 
drick, LL.D., Professor of Greek in the University 
of Rochester. New York : Sheldon & Company, 
677 Broadway. 1873. 

At this period in the history of classical 
learning, when a knowledge of Greek and 
Latin is at everybody's command, and text 
books of rare scholarship and superb typogra- 
■phj are already in our hands, we must look 
for something pretty substantial behind the 
title page of a new comer to ensure it a hearty 
welcome. Especially does this remark apply 
to editions of Xenophon's Anabasis, a work 
whose gracefulness and simple beauty have 
long since given it a permanent place in our 
fitting schools. 

Judged by this standard — severe, perhaps 
— the work before us seems in many particu- 
lars to stand the test. 

With map, vocabulary, notes, itinerar}'-, 
and a short summary of grammatical and rhe- 
torical principles, it is armed Avith all the 
appliances for enabling a young student to 
work with considerable ease and dig sense 
out of the magical " Grecian dots." 

The map is Kiepert's, and in this case its 
features are considerably bettered and bright- 
ened with colored lines showing the route of 
the ten thousand and the extent of the Sa- 
trapy of Cyrus. 

The itinerary contains a summary of the 
story with all its minutiaj — such as the num- 
ber of days on a march, or at a halt, parasangs 
advanced each day, place of encampment, 
events, and also the particular book and 
chapter in the Anabasis where each item is 
recorded. 

As to the notes. Dr. Kendrick's reputation 
as a Greek scholar should be sufficient guar- 
anty. The only criticism we can apply to 
them is the one more or less applicable to all 
text books with notes we ever saw — namely, 
the giving undue promineirce to some points 



106 



BOWBOIN ORIENT. 



and passing over others quite as noticeable in 
silence. The references made are chiefly to 
the grammar of Prof. Hadlej', the editor's re- 
vised edition of Bullion's, and to " Goodwin's 
Greek Moods and Tenses." 

The only objectionable feature about the 
work is in the appearance of the text itself. It 
appears as though seen through an invisible 
mist, just showing the effect without betray- 
ing the cause. This, it seems to us, must 
be wearying to the eyes of the pupil. Per- 
haps the trouble is with the pupil of our eyes ; 
at any rate we think it might be alleviated by 
looking at heavier type and a less ghostly- 
white paper. 

A Shoet-Hand Legible as the Plainest Writ- 
ing, and Requiring no Teacher but the Book. 
With a Simplifned System of Verbatim Eeport- 
iDg. By the Rev. W. E. Scovil, m.a. Fifth 
American Edition. Edited and published by W. 
E. Scovil, Jr., B.A., No. 70 AVilliam Street, New 
York, 1873. Price $1.25. 

So far as we are able to judge with our 
limited knowledge of short-hand, this Uttle 
work well merits the attention of reporters 
and all others interested in this species of 
writing. In simj)licity the system of Mr. Sco- 
vil seems to possess advantages over others 
now prevailing, and perhaps we cannot better 
show in just what respects than by quoting 
one or two of the accompanying testimonials. 
Here is one from A. G. Hapgood, Esq., a.b., 
Harvard University " : — 

" Among the most important of the nu- 
merous recommendations of your system is 
the omission of those heavy strokes and vow- 
el points which are so common in most sys- 
tems, and by which rapidity and legibility are 
diminished. Yours is the simplest, the easi- 
est to learn, and the most legible I have ever 
seen." 

H. N. Shepard, Esq., Cambridge, Mass., 
says : " Your short-hand is very easily learned, 
and I am siu'prised at the little labor it re- 
quires to gain a good practical proficiency in 
it. My experience has fully confirmed the 



statement on your title-page, ' legible as the 
plainest writing.' " 

The external appearance of the book is all 
that could be desired. It is tastefully bound 
in green cloth, and is of convenient size to be 
carried in the pocket. 

Old and Neiu for October contains an arti- 
cle of eleven pages on the Springfield Regatta, 
with diagrams illustrating the course and the 
position of the different crews at every half 
mile. 

Among the other contents are the first 
part of "A Tale of the Simplon," by the ed- 
itor ; " Puck," Wm. W. Young ; " My Time 
and What I've Done with It " is continued ; 
"Socialism in Europe," Austin Bierbower; 
" Country Sights and Sounds," M. H. Hink- 
ley ; " A Flower Eoom," Marie Howland ; 
" The Changeling," Latienne ; " The Father 
of Zebedee's Children," G. Haven Putnam ; 
" Susan Goes to Derby"; "Is Seeing Believ- 
ing ? " O. S. Adams. " Scrope, or the Lost 
Library " reaches its twentieth chapter. The 
Examiner has for contents: Literature and 
Dogma ; Sibley's Harvard Graduates ; Ques- 
tion of the Day ; Woman in American Socie- 
ty ; Dimitri Roudine ; Other New Books. 

The October Lippincot€s has the following 
table of contents : " The New Hj'periou. 
From Paris to Marley by Way of the Rhine. 
IV. A Day in Strasburg." Illustrated. Ed- 
ivard Strahan. " From the Potomac to the 
Ohio." Illustrated. " An Episode in the Life 
of a Strong-Minded Woman." Marshall Neil. 
" The King of Bavaria." U. JE. " On the 
Church Steps." Chaps, x.-xii. Conclusion. 
Sarah C. Hallowell. "A Strange Land and 
a Peculiar People." Will Wallace Rarney. 
" Similitude." Emma Lazarus. " Our Home 
in the Tyrol." Chaps, xi. and xii. Illustrated. 
Conclusion. Margaret Howitt. " Unsaid." 
Charlotte F. B.ates. " Laurentinum." A. A. 
B. "A Princess of Thule." Chaps, xvi.-xviii. 
William Black, author of " The Strange Adven- 



BO WD OUST ORIENT. 



107 



tures of a Phaeton." " The Last of the Idyls." 
F. F. Elms. "Our Monthly Gossip" — An 
Evening in Calcutta, No Danbury for Me, 
Another Ghost, Notes. " Literatiu'e of the 
Day " — Hamertou's " Intellectual Life." 



DR. WOODS'S LIBRARY. 

The Argus speaks thus of the loss of the 
valuable library of Prof. Woods of Bowdoin 
College, which was totally destroyed by fire 
at Brunswick, Aug. 8 : The manuscript re- 
ferred to was the edition of the famous Hak- 
luyt manuscript, which Dr. Woods discovered 
in Wales in 1869 and had nearly prepared 
for publication, with copious annotations, un- 
der the auspices of the Maine Historical So- 
ciety. This manuscript, which for many years 
was lost, the heads only being preserved in 
the British Museum, gives an account of the 
earliest Englisli settlements on the American 
continent, and proves that they were founded 
upon the coast of Maine. While the Profes- 
sor was iu London he incidentally heard that 
this manuscript was in possession of Sir Thos. 
Phillips, a rich but very eccentric gentleman, 
residing in Wales. He very seldom formed 
any new acquaintances, and the Doctor had 
almost despaired of seeing him, when he 
became acquainted with a lady who knew Sii- 
Thomas, and after much trouble succeeded in 
procuring an introduction. Even then the 
manuscript was not allowed to be taken from 
the house, and had to be copied. This copy, 
with the results of four years of diligent 
study, is now lost, and the work is to do all 
over again. The book was nearly ready for 
the press, and was looked for with great inter- 
est by historical students in both hemispheres, 
so that the delay in its publication will occa- 
sion a disappointment, not merely local but 
almost world-wide. 



Prof. Dixi Crosby, ll.d., of Hanover, N.H., 
died recently, aged seventy-three years. 



Heliotype Publication 

— OF THE — 

GRAY COLLECTION 

— OF — 

ENGRAVINGS 

Harvard College, 

— BY — 

JAMES R. OSGOOD & CO., Publishers, 

BOSTON. 

Messrs. James R. Osgood & Co. have the pleasure of announcing that 
by the desire of the President and Fellows of Harvard College, they are 
now publishing Heliotype reproductions of the principal art treasures of 
the " Gray Collection of Eugra^Tngs," owned by Harvard College. This 
Collection is one of the most complete and perfect in the country. It con- 
tains the choicest and moat costly proofs of many of the best engravers of 
the world, and is especially rich in the original works of Albert Durer, 
Rembrandt, Marc-Antonio, Lukaa Van Leyden, Caracci, and others. It 
comprises the beat engravings of Raphael Morghen, Longhi, Toschi, Ander- 
loni, MuUer, Willie, Desnoyers, Mandul, Strange, Sharpe, Woollet, and 
other leading engravers, from the pictures of Raphael, Titian, Correggio, 
Guido, Leonardo da Vinci, Murillo and other celebrated artists. The por- 
traits by Velazquez, Van Dyck and others, and tlie engraved heads of dis- 
tinguished persoQS by Nantouil, Edeliuck, Masson and Houbraken are a 
most important feature of the collection. 

The publishers are enabled by means of the rapidity, faithfulness and 
artistic quality of the HeHotyi>e Process, to offer beautiful reproductions 
from the choicest and most costly works of art at the luwL'st possible prices. 
Rare etchings or artist-proof engravings worth hundreds of dollars each, 
may be reproduced and snld at prices varying from fifty cents to two or 
three dollars, thus bringing the tre;i3ure3 of arl-galleries within the rciich 
of all, and affording a means of art-education hitherto unattainable. 
About 70 subjects are now ready. 

Special prices made with Colleges and Institutions of Learning. Nearly 
10,000 prints have been sold to the students of Harvard. 

'W. T. GOODAIiE, Publishers* Agent, 

For Bowdoin College. 

FURNITURE WAREROOMS, 

No. I Arcade Building Brunswick. 

MAltVEY STETSON, 

Manufacturer and Dealer in PAKLOR AND CHAMBER FURNITUEE, 
of every description. Mattresses, Feather Beds and Feathers, Spring Beds, 
Carpets, Trunks and Valises. 
Studeota will always find here a first class assortment. 



BUSINESS CARDS. 



STKODT & HOLMES, 
COUNSELOHg AT LAW, 

No. 88 Middle Street (Canal Bank Building), PORTLAND, ME. 

A. A. STROtJT. GEO. F. HOLMES ('66). 

JOSEPH A. LOCKE (Bowdoin, '65), Attorney and Counsellor at Law, 
74 Middle Street, cor. E.xchange Street, PORTLAND. 



108 



BOWBOm ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Classical Department. 

TERMS OF ADMISSION. 

Candidates for admission into the Freshman Class are examined as fol- 
ows : — 

Harkness's Latin Grammar, including Prosody, Parts I. and H. Hark- 
ness's Introduction to Latin Prose Composition; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and six books of the iEneid; Cicero's Select Orations-, Salluat. 

Hadley's or Goodwin's Greek Grammar; Goodwin's Greek Reader; or 
Xenophon's Anabasis, 4 books, and Homer's Iliad, 2 books. 

Arithmetic; Algebra, to equations of the second degree; Davies's 
Legendre's Geometry, first and third books. 

English Grammar; Ancient and Modern Geography. 

Scientific Department. 

TEEMS OF ADMISSION. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the following subjects : — 
Mathematics — Arithmetic, including Common and Decimal Frac- 
tions, luterest, and Square Root; Algebra, to Equations of the 
Second Degree; Geometry, Books I. and HE. of Davies's Le- 
gendre. 
Geography — Political Geography, and simple elements of Astrono- 
mical and Physical Geography. 
History — Leading facts in general History, and especially in Ameri- 
can History. 
Latin — Allen's Latin Grammar, or the equivalent. 
English — The examination will consist in 1st, Reading aloud a pas- 
sage from some standard author, with explanations of gram- 
matical construction, and definition and derivation of words; 2d, 
Writing a few sentences in English, on some familiar subject, 
reference being had to spelling and punctuation as well as to 
composition; 3d Correction^ of ungrammatical sentences com- 
posed for the purpose. 
AU candidates for admission must produce certificates of their good 
moral character. 

The time for admission is the Friday after Commencement, and the 
first Thursday of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants may be 
examined at other times. 

Courses of Study. 

The regular course of Instruction is that commended by the leading 
colleges of the country as eminently adapted_to secure liberal culture. 

THE SCIENTIFIC COURSE 

has been recently organized. Thirty-four students have already entered, — 
a fact which indicates that the College has been successful in its effort to 
meet the demand for a liberal course of study which shall at the same 
time look towards the actual uses and applications of knowledge. 
The studies pursued in this course are comprised in the following: — 
Languages — English one year, and optional two ; Latin one year, 
optional three ; French one year, optional three ; German one 
year, optional two ; Spanish, Italian, Swedish, Anglo-Saxon, one 
year. 
Mathematics — Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, Mensuration, 
Spherical Trigonometry, Analytical Geometry ; Differential and 
Integral Calculus, with the application of these to Sin-veying, 
Navigation, Projections, Dialling, Levelling,- Astronomy, Mechan- 
ics, Topographical and Hydrographical Engineering. 
Natural History — Geology, Mineralogy, Botany, Zoology, with their 
relations to the Industrial Arts. 



Natural Philosophy — Mechanics, Hydrodynamics, Pneumatics, 
Optics, Astronomy, Light, Heat, Electricity, &c. 

Chemistry — In all its branches and applications. 

History and Political Science— General, Medieval and Modem His- 
tory, Political Economy, General Principles of Law, Interna- 
tional Law, Law of Evidence, Constitution of United States, 
Theory of Government, American Law. 

Philosophy — Rhetoric, Logic, Psychology, Metaphysics, Evidences 
of Natural and Revealed Religion, Ethics, Esthetics. 

The studies of the first two years are common throughout the Depart- 
ment and are intended to lay a broad and substantial foundation for all 
branches of subsequent study. In the last two years the studies are 
arranged in distinct courses, in accordance with certain leading objects : a 
general scientific culture, or special technical skill. Attention is particu- 
larly invited to the facilities offered for the thorough study of Civil Engi 
neering. 



A POST-GRADUATE COURSE 



of two years is also commenced, in which Instruction will be given in 
he following schools: — 

I. Letters — Comprising Languages, Ancient and Modem (includ- 
ing the Oriental) with their literatures; Philology; Rhetoric; 
Logic ; History ; Elocution ; the Fine Arts. This leads to the 
degree of Master of Arts. 

n. Science — Advanced Mathematics, Physics, Natiu^l History and 
Chemistry, in their uses and appUcations. This leads to the 
degree of Doctor of Science. 

m. Philosophy — Comprising the above, considered in their reasons 
and relations ; Psychology, Metaphysics, Ethics, Esthetics ; Poli- 
tics ; Theory of Government, Constitutional History, Principles 
of Law, International Law. Leading to the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy. 

rV. Medicine — ^The Medical School of Maine. Degree, — M. D. 

Students who are not graduates will be received on satisfactory evi- 
dence of proficiency in study which will enable them to profit by this 
Course. 

Much and careful attention is given to Physical Culture under the train 
ngof accomplished Instructors. The Gymnasium is well provided with 
approved apparatus, and the opportunities for Mihtary drill and discipline 
are of the very best. 

It is but just to say that good morals and manliness are distinguishing 
features of college life at Bowdoln. 

The Library of Bowdoin is one of rare value, and the choicest works 
are constantly added. The Gallery of Paintings is well known to be one oi 
the most remarkable in the country. The Cabinet and apparatus are 
ample for their purpose. 

The annual expenses are, for tuition, &c., $90. Board $2.50 and $4.00 
a week. Pecuniary assistance, from the income of thirty scholarships and 
various other benefactions, is rendered to those who are unable fully to 
meet their expenses otherwise. 

Commencement July 10th. Examination for admission July 12th and 
Aug. 28th, at 9 a.m. 

First term begins Aug. 28th, at evening. 

Every encouragement will be given to persons who desire to pursue 
any study taught in the College. 

The town of Brunswick, situated on tide water — the Androscoggin River ; 
on one side and the Ocean on the other ; already a seat of various manu- 
factures and destined to become one of the principal railroad centres of the . 
State, easy also of access from all quarters, — presents an excellent locality ' 
for scientific as well as literary pursuits, while the facilities afforded by 
Bowdoin College, its Libraries, Galleries of Art, Cabinets, Scientific Col- 
lections, Laboratories, and Apparatus, offer great inducements to the ear- " 
nest student of the TTseful and Liberal Arts 



Vol. III. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, OCTOBER 29, 1873. 



No. 10. 



DAT DREAMS. 

Tho' a gnarled and knotty subject, yet my fancy bids me sing 
Of the fence across the high^vay, of that rude, misshapen 

thing, 
Built of uptorn roots and fragments of what once were 

forest trees. 

Standing straight like spinsters prudish, or coquetting with 

tho breeze ; 

And I fancy 

That I can see 
In those shapes, so rude and twisted, 

Something hidden 

That, unbidden, 
Speaks of forms that once existed 
In tho wildwood. 

And as on a winter evening sitting by tho glowing fire — 

"Where the flamelets dart and vanish, dying low, then leap- 
ing higher, 

"Whore our fancy holds free riot, and wo sit and think and 
dream. 

And impossible conceptions mingle with the firelight's 

gleam, — 

Fonns of Beauty, 

Deeds of Duty, 
Love and Hope and Joy and Fear, 

All commingling, 

Set us tingling 
"With sensations droll and queer, 
As in childhood, — 

So I sit and gaze upon those crooked roots so grim and bare, 

Ugly souvenirs of beings that were beautiful and fair. 

And their many shapes enchant me like those forked 

tongues of flame, 

And I look and feel the longing that no mortal e'er could 

name, — 

But no woman, 

Man, or human 
Being but has felt the same 

Joyous, serious, 

"V"ague, mysterious, 
Fond desire without a name 
To be spoken. 



And as now in life's bright morning, I am happy, gay, and 

free. 
And I daily meet with blessings, blessings meant alone 

for me, — 
To myself I murmur, as the Past and Present I compare, 
Had not all been as it has been things would not he as 
they are; 

For one little 
Jot or tittle, 
In the centuries agone, 
Had it faltered 
"Would have altered, 
Nay, destroyed tho perfect dawn 
That has broken. 

Thus in ways I cannot fathom speaks the fence across tho 

way, 
For without its uncouth features I had scarcely thought 

to-day 
Of my debt of obligation — of tho thankfulness I owe 
To the Author of my being vrho doth every good bestow ; 
"Why, I know not, 
For they show not 
Any signs of love or duty ; 
And their many 
Forms uncanny 
Surely cannot boast of beauty 
In the least ; 

Tot with silent voice they greet me, and I feel a subtle 

sense 
Of poetical suggestion coming from that rustic fence, 
Lifting me above the Present, filling me with thoughts 

sublime 
Of that inexperienced Future far beyond the realms of 
Time, 

Through whose portals 
Gaze all mortals 
Who to happiness aspire, — 
"Where is pleasure 
Beyond measure, 
And the acme of desire, — 

Perfect peace. 

OunEts. 



no 



BOWDOm ORIENT. 



THE BROOK. 

Eippling, lauglaing little brooklet — 
Bubbling, dimpling into eddies 
Down the grassy banks, a wanderer 
Trickling over stones and pebbles, 
Stepping stones to future greatness 
Laughingly surmounting; 
Musical thy voice in summer; 
Always full of merry humor; 
'Neath the shady banks in ripplets. 
Laving all the flowering rootlets. 
Whispering to the reeds and willows 
Gentle words of sweet contentment. 
Zephyrs soft caress thee fondly, 
And the storm bespeaks thee blandly, 
For thy mirth goes on unceasing. 
Louder with the winds increasing. 
Hoarser with the thunders crashing. 

Laughing them to scorn. 
"Winter may awhile restrain thee 
And his icy hand detain thee; 
But he cannot still thy singing. 
And thy plaintive voice still ringing 
Through its prison wall asceudeth. 
And with nature's chorus blendeth. 

Foaming, leaping, whirling, seething, 

Tumbling, tossing iuto wavelets. 

Who would recognize the brooklet 

In that grand majestic river 

Where the sun's rays glance and quiver 

And the tide rolls heavily. 

Still methinks I hear those accents 

In the intervals of silence. 

Mingled with the constant plashing 

Of the waters landward dashing, 

And the sombre sounding cadence 

Of the swelling waves, 
Accents of the well-known brooklet 
When it laved the thirsting rootlets. 
Whispered to the reeds and willows, 
Wandered through the fruitful fallows, 
Leaving in its onward motion 

Irrigating rills behind. 

Fattstus. 



INCIDENTS FEOM GERMAN UNIVER- 
SITY LIFE. 
Br Peofessoe Caemichael. . 

II. 

In entering a German University no exam- 
ination is required. The candidate presents 
testimonials of good character, and a certifi- 
cate of graduation from the common schools. 
He is at first admitted on probation, and after 
a short time, having paid a matriculation fee 
of about five dollars, and having sworn to 
obey the University laws and regulations, is 
summoned into the presence of the prosector, 
as the presiding officer of the University is 
called, and after a very dull address of advice 
and welcome, is taken by the hand and pro- 
nounced a member of the institution. 

As the matriculation fee did not exactly 
make a round sum the student would gener- 
ally receive back change, whereupon another 
official would approach with a large contribu- 
tion box, conspicuously labeled, " For the 
Poor." Most persons, in their joy at having 
reached such an important stage in intellec- 
tual development, gladly gave all that re- 
mained as a thank-offering, and it was amus- 
ing to notice the sly manner with which the 
others, slipping all the important coins into 
their pockets, would, with the most philan- 
thropic expiression, deposit a sum only possible 
in a German currency. 

One of the most obnoxious features of 
continental governments, to a traveler, is the 
excessive development of legal enactments. 
Whichever way you turn you are apt to run 
against a law. From this burden of ,the 
citizen the well-beloved student is entirely 
relieved. The police have no power to arrest 
Mm, and it is only when dismissed from the 
University that he can be brought before the 
civil court. 

There is not a single exercise or lecture 
that the student is obliged to attend ; there is 
no time or course of study prescribed ; and 
recitations which chiefly comprise the course 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Ill 



ill our own higher institutions are in them 
unknown. The student comes and goes fi'ee 
from all restraint and supervision; remaining 
such a time and attending such lectures as 
may please liim. We have known instances 
where the student had heard scarcely as many 
lectures as he had been sessions in attendance. 

Some forty years ago a certain man ordered 
in his last will and testament that his fond 
nephew should receive annuallj-, during his 
university career, the sum of two hundred 
dollars. The remarkable career of the nephew 
now bids fair to reach a half-century. 

Like some water-logged craft this gray- 
headed student, "The Ancient" as he is 
popularly called, still stems the tide of uni- 
versity life. To acquaintances who would 
know the time of graduation, the information 
is still imparted that the finishing touches are 
being given to the theme, and his examination 
is to take place without delay. 

The new comer finds the University to be 
a projected picture of himself, or rather that 
whicli he makes it ; if he has a slender purse 
his lodgings and fare will be mean enough, 
yet the advantages he seeks will be in a great 
measure obtainable. If he comes suj^ported 
b}^ the resources of rich, indulgent and incon- 
siderate parents, there is scarcel}- a limit to 
his prodigality; the fees for privileges and the 
tax upon luxury are certain, however, to reach 
the limit of his sui^plies. 

The ardent, ambitious student, who would 
rise high in the civil service of his country, 
or in the opinion of men, knows well there is 
no time to waste. There is no need that the 
teacher should compel his atteudanoe, or even 
encourage him. This class seems peculiarly 
free from the numerous ailments to which 
students' flesh is heir, for let the time, placB, 
or weather, be what it may, the lecturer 
may rely upon their presence. As the Ger- 
man Professor's salary, smaU enough in any 
event, is in a great measure contingent upon 
the number of his auditors, we might expect 



him to take great pains in securing an elegant 
diction, courtly manners, and an eloquent 
deliver}^, but nothing of the sort is discover- 
able ; on the contrary there seems frequently 
an utter absence of all those devices by which 
our own orators make themselves attractive. 
If we follow the throng of students to ascer- 
tain the grounds of popularity, we are more 
apt to find the cei>tre of attraction a man of 
unprepossessing if not insignificant bearing. 
The speaker, with ej^es fixed on the yellow 
manuscript, without gesticulation or change 
of tone, mumbles through the hour. Not a 
single expression of feeling or stroke of wit 
relieves the monotony or would prove him to 
be more than a word machine. Yet this man's 
name may be known bej'ond the seas, and 
students hj fifties hang iqjon his lips listening 
as if for glad tidings or for the disclosure of 
their fate. 

Here is the celebrated Professor of Phys- 
ics, a small, smooth-faced, almost contemptible 
appearing man, whose shabb}-, ill-fitting cloth- 
ing and soiled linen would seem to indicate 
poverty, a man so clumsy in his actions that 
he is scarcely to be entrusted with his own 
apparatus, yet his lectures are thronged, for 
every one knows him to be a genius. Long 
before Morse had invented the telegraph, this 
little professor had discovered and practically 
used it, and the wires then stretched from his 
laboratory to the astronomical observatory 
stand to this Haj. 

Some of the most wonderful instruments 
of precision, and the most striking discoveries 
of the present century, have emanated from 
his studio. When he speaks, his shrill voice 
trembles, his body quivers, and the words are 
brought into the world with most absurd 
gestures and grotesque grimaces, yet never 
have I seen even a smile upon a student's face. 

It is the great problem for the American 
educator to solve, how to create such a scien- 
tific and literary hunger among the young. 
The system of rank and of class honors is 



112 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



notablj'' deficient, and, on the other hand, 
whenever we have seen the German plan 
tried it has signally failed. How many, as if 
surfeited with knowledge, turn with loathing 
from their books, though the absolute amount 
received is considerably less than that acquired 
by their German counterparts ! Where is the 
spur which the pupil and not the teacher shall 
apply ? How may such a keen, generous, 
healthy appetite be developed ? 

The industrious class of German students, 
above referred to, may be more numerous, 
they are certainly not so conspicuous as that 
whose chief aim is fun and frolic. 

In the German Universities are numerous 
chartered fraternities or corps, whose object is 
partly convivial and partlj^ for the encour- 
agement and practice of duelling. From 
their midnight revels the University court de- 
rives its chief occupation and the University 
prison the most of its occupants. 

They form a merry set, pleasant to con- 
template, and though their occupations appear 
frivolous if not criminal, from these Germany 
has drawn some of its best statesmen and most 
learned scholars. It is a peculiar phase of 
life and merits special attention. 



THE EIGHT OF BOLTING. 

The sagacious move of Gen. Butler at 
Worcester, has provoked a wide range of dis- 
cussion, and political editors, the country over, 
are marshaling their pros and cons with a 
rapidity and subtlety that is marvelous even 
for them. The origin of the discussion is 
briefly stated. At the Worcester Convention 
Gen. Butler introduced a resolution premising 
that a certain delegate had announced his in- 
tention of bolting should Butler be nominated, 
and debarring him from a seat in the Conven- 
tion. This aroused a vigorous opposition, as 
everything does which Gen. Butler proposes, 
and the resolution was finally smothered in 
the Committee-room, the majority not having 



the courage to put themselves on record either 
way. 

The principle involved is of moment to 
every American citizen, since its decision af- 
fects not only the vitality of political parties 
but even the principles which underlie our 
republican form of government. , We are 
heartily in sympathy with the tenor of Gen. 
Butler's resolution. We believe it to be the 
essence of political honor and justice. What- 
ever rights a man may claim as a priyate citi- 
zen, the moment he enters a convention of his 
party, as a member, his individual character 
disappears, and he morally binds himself to 
abide the issue of that Convention. The 
vital principle upon which rests the strength 
of political Conventions, parties, and our Re- 
public itself, is the right of the majority to 
rule, and the duty of the minority to submit. 
What man to-day acknowledges the right of 
secession ? And yet the principle involved is 
the same. The supporters of a certain candi- 
date expend all their energies in endeavoring 
to control a convention in their own interests, 
expecting, if successful, to receive the support 
of the opposition. They enter the Conven- 
tion tacitly acknowledging their allegiance, 
and they have no more a moral right to refuse 
to abide the action of the Convention than an 
American citizen has to refuse to obey the 
authority of the General Government. 

But it may be urged that a man may thus 
be compelled to accept men and measures 
which he cannot consistently do. The remedy, 
or rather the preventive, is very evident. 
He must of necessity know the plans which 
the various cliques of his party will advocate, 
and if the probabilities are that he cannot hon- 
orably support the action of the Convention, 
he should not enter as a member. The Wash- 
burn Republicans of Massachusetts, if they 
could not accept Gen. Butler as their candi- 
date, should have followed the advice of the 
New York Evening Post, and presented Gov. 
Washburn's name to the people, announcing 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



113 



that they should not attend the Convention 
and could not consider themselves bound by- 
its action. 

The root of the difficulty is that every 
man thinks and acts differently, and learns so 
naturally to magnify little matters of preju- 
dice into great mountains of right and wrong. 
There is a vast difference between right itself 
and what a man considers right. If we would 
live under a republican form of government, 
we must learn to waive even our sentiments 
of right and wrong. We must remember 
that the good of the whole iudirectly involves 
the good of each individual. 

If the party to which a man belongs takes 
an erroneous position, it is not his duty nor 
his privilege to basely desert it. By far the 
nobler and better course for him is to remain 
within his party, battle manfully against the 
error, and strive, if possilAe, to eradicate it. 

The great eri'or in the lives of such men as 
Wendell Phillips, is in cutting lose from party 
affiliations and placing themselves either in 
advance of or behind public opinion. How 
much nobler would have been their lives, how 
much greater their influence if they had con- 
nected themselves with some of the living 
political parties of the day, voluntarily laying 
aside their own personal opinions if necessary. 
We believe it to be the duty of every Ameri- 
can to become a member of some party. From 
the nature of our institutions, political parties 
will control the destinies of our Republic, and 
it behooves every man to devote all his energies 
to purifying and strengthening his party rather 
than to quibbling upon what he considers the 
proper method of running our political ma- 
chinery. Radical. 



We copy the following from the Springjield 
Republican : — 
I'o the Editors of the Springjidd EcpiihUcan. 

One of the pleasantest incidents of regat- 
ta week was the presentation of a handsome 



cameo ring, by a number of his Springfield 
friends, to George Price, the trainer of the 
Bowdoin crew. The affair was intended as a 
surprise ; so, after tea, Thursday, the crew, 
accompanied by Mr. Price, started for Mr. 
Harrigan's, for the nominal purpose of taking 
leave of him before starting for home. Our 
hearty reception upon arriving was in cheer- 
ful contrast with the walk from our quarters 
through a pelting rain. Our host conducted 
us into his sitting-room, and informed us that 
he had been selected to make the presentation, 
but he felt more like Gen. Grant on that oc- 
casion than ever before, inasmuch as he was 
utterly unable to make A speech. This ring 
his friends in Sju-ingfield had asked him to 
present to Mr. Price, as a " slight token of 
their regard for him as a gentleman and an 
oarsman." Mr. Price responded in a few 
words, stating both Ir's surprise and apprecia- 
tion, and declared that his belief was unshaken 
in the " St. John stroke," as exemplified by 
the Bowdoins, despite ihe untoward circum- 
stances of the da}'. A collation was then 
served by our host, of which we all showed 
an undoubted appreciation. 

" BOWDOIN." 

Brunswick, Mc, July 20. 



Prof. Dixi Crosljy, LL.D.,of Hanover, N.H., 
died a few weeks since at the age of seventy 
three years. He was born in Sandwich, N.H., 
pursued his academical studies at Gilmanton, 
and his professional studies with his father and 
with his brother. For a time he pi-acticed in 
Gilmanton and Laconia ; in 1838, became 
Professor of Surgery in Dartmouth Medical 
School, and later has also been appointed to 
other positions there. He represented Hano- 
ver in the State Legislature, and in 1862 was 
chosen State Railroad Commissioner. Prof. 
Crosby was a man who made his mark in his 
profession and in the community. He leaves 
two sons, both physicians: Dr. A. B. Crosby, 
a Professor of Surgery at Hanover and at 
Medical College at Brooklyn, JST.Y., and Dr. 
A. H. Crosby, a well known phj^sician of 
Concord. 



114 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PUBLISHED EYEET ALTEENATE WEDNESDAY DUE- 
TSii THE COLLEGIATE XBAE AT 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE, 
By the Class or 1874. 

EDITORS. 

S. V. Cole, L. H. Kimball, 

W. T. GooDALE, D. 0. S. Lowell, 

r. W. Hawthorne, F. K. Whbelee, 

H. K. White. 

Teems — $2 00 a year in advance; siugle copies, 
15 cents. 

Address communicatious to BowDortsr Orient, 
Brunswick, Maine. 

For sale at 7 Appleton Hall, Bowdoiu College. 
Also by J. Griffin and B. G. Deuuison, Brunswick ; 
and A. Williams & Co., 135 Washington St., Boston. 



CONTENTS. 
Vol. III., No. 10. — Oct. 29, 1873. 

Day Dreams 109 

The Brook 110 

Incidents from German University Life. II. . . . 110 

The Eight of Bolting 112 

Editorial Notes 114 

The Cornell Tragedy 115 

Base Ball 117 

Local lis 

Alumni Notes 119 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



The manager of the Bowdoin course of 
lectures desires us to state, by way of expla- 
nation, that the course was started under the 
impression that there would be no Senior 
course : if there were, however, this course 
would not interfere, as it comes so early in 
the season. Furthermore, this course was not 



started in any spirit of opposition, and to prove 
this, he states that the opportunity was offered 
to a Senior before it was to the present man- 
ager. 



Rather interesting time the Bowdoin Nine 
must have had at Lewiston, recently. One of 
the number received a fall, injuring the knee so 
severely that crutches have been found con- 
venient. Another had a digit or two dis- 
jointed, while a third collided as to his superior 
maxillary bone (so the doctor tells us) with 
the ball just returning fi'om the bat. 

Judging from hearsay (and there is a good 
deal of it), we suppose the Bates College ball 
ground is quite a landscape. 



If the parties who took the Bible from 
the Chapel desk consider they have done a 
commendable act, either they are greatly mis- 
taken, or their vocabulary is essentially differ- 
ent from ours. Under ordinary circumstances 
the crime of Bible-stealing is said to be dimin- 
ished in direct ratio as the perpetrator needs 
scriptural instruction. But when one steals a 
Bible having connected with it such associa- 
tions as this particular copy has, very little 
can be' said in the way of excuse. If any one 
really desires a copy of the holy book, and has 
no means of buying it, he need not necessa- 
rily resort to unlawful means for the purpose 
of satisfying his desire. It is generally un- 
derstood that Mr. Jordan Snow keeps Bibles 
to give away. Moreover, if any one in Col- 
lege will come to this office and state his case, 
we should be very happy to supply him with 
a fac-simile of King James's version. Now 
with reference to the theft which we are con- 
sidering, either one or two things is the case : 
The perpetrators of the act have little sense 
of propriety and no regard for the feelings of 
one of our most respected professors, or they 
will speedily restore the Bible to its 'proper 
place. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



115 



THE CORNELL TRAGEDY. 

It is not often in the course of college his- 
tory that an event occurs so startling in its 
nature, and so terriljle in its lesson, as the one 
just witnessed by the students of Cornell Uni- 
versity. We hear of all kinds of college bar- 
barities, but not of college tragedies ; we hear 
of frights and accidents, but not of fatalities. 
Here is an exception ; here is a students' freak 
resulting in the instant death of one young 
man and the imminent peril of two othei's. 
Probably the facts are already known to many 
of our readers, but a brief sketch of the affair 
may not be out of place, for the information 
of such as have overlooked it in the daily 
papers. The name of the victim was J\Iorti- 
mer M. Leggett, youngest son of Commis- 
sioner Leggett of the United States Pension 
Office. The occasion was a college initiation. 
It was about nine o'clock in the evening when 
a dozen members of the Kappa Alpha frater- 
nity gathered outside the village of Ithaca, 
for the purpose of introducing young Leggett 
into the mysteries of the society. The latter, 
it seems, was blindfolded, and, for some rea- 
son unknown to us, was left standing, with 
two other persons, beside the brhik of the 
gorge through which the stream found its way. 
The remainder of the party, being in the 
neighborhood, suddenly heard a rustling of 
leaves and bushes, and on looking up found 
the three had disappeared. At first, they 
were somewhat at a loss, but on approaching 
nearer heard groans coming from below. The 
terrible truth flashed upon them ! The three 
had fallen over the precipice. Immediatel}'' 
proceeding to the bottom of the ravine they 
found Leggett lying on a bank of earth, one 
of his companions close beside him, the other 
about eight feet distant. Hereupon, one of 
the party named Northup started for assist- 
ance, and on the way met Professor Crane of 
the University. The two obtained a carriage 
and returned as speedily as possible to the 
spot. By means of a gate wrenched from a 



neighboring fence, the injiured persons were 
conveyed to the carriage, which was driven 
to the village, where medical assistance could 
be obtained. 

It was found that Leggett was fatally in- 
jured. He had fallen about fifty feet. His 
skuU was fractured and the bones of the neck 
dislocated. He lived only half an hour, and 
during that time was luiconsciously moaning, 
" Oh, don't," " take it off," probably referring 
to the bandage over his eyes. The others 
had bones broken and were severely, though 
not fatally, injured. 

The case of Leggett was especially sad. 
He was but seventeen j-ears old, already a 
graduate of Columbia Law School of Wash- 
ington City, and his connection with Cornell 
University embraced the short period of four 
weeks. 

Now how is the cause Avhich brought him 
to his death to be considei'ed ? " Accident " 
is the verdict of the coroner's jury. Accident 
it certainly was, looking at it from the stand- 
point of leniency to the members of the Kappa 
Alpha fraternity, but considered in the light 
of justice it was something more. We must 
place it somewhere among that class of deeds 
known in civil law as accidents for want of a 
better name, but in the moral code distin- 
guished as culpable offenses. Leggett's death 
may be called a crime on the part of his com- 
panions against common sense. That is the 
onl}^ alternative left against considering it an 
intentional murder. 

Now just at this point an array of facts 
comes up before us from every college in the 
land. Coi'nell is by no means the worst insti- 
tution that exists, nor do her students show 
less sense of propriety than those of other 
colleges. Deeds savoring of old-time barbar- 
ity and modern inanity combined, have been 
found at our very doors. Hundreds of things 
are made to happen in a college course, which 
might terminate in fatal accidents for aught we 
do to prevent them. Rough sports in college, or 



116 



BOWDOm ORIENT. 



anywhere else, — for colleges haven't exclusive 
jurisdiction in this respect, — belong away back 
in the Middle Ages, when personal daring was 
a young man's laudable ambition. Now-a-days 
such things are to be deprecated, whether con- 
nected with society initiations or Freshman 
hazing, or with any other name. Only once 
in a great while do freaks terminate so seri- 
ously as the one at Cornell, but it is not 
because they are not thrust forward by the 
same kind of preliminaries. Considering the 
multitude of examples, though several could 
be cited where death has paid the penalty, the 
wonder is that more do not come to fatal 
results. The only difference between those 
which do not and those which do is this : 
The former, by some fortuitous and inexplica- 
ble twistings of fate, slip away from sight with 
impunity and are heard of no more, while the 
latter take the normal path marked out for 
them by thoughlessness and fun and terminate 
in " accidents." 

Even suspension from ropes, icy-cold pump 
baths at midnight, and other characteristic 
sports, though highly gratifying to the perpe- 
trators, are seldom for the best health of the 
individuals most nearly concerned. Blowing 
up halls with gunpowder, of which Stough- 
ton Hall at Cambridge had a taste two years 
ago, accomplishes little good for the occupants. 
Then such immaterial assaults as extraordi- 
nary frights work no real benefit to the owner 
of a vivid imagination. 

But where is the remedy ? Must students 
on entering college be required to present cer- 
tificates of good moral character ? That was 
a dead letter long ago. We all have good 
moral characters, and whether we have or not 
has little to do with the question. Must col- 
leges refuse admittance to such as are inclined 
to indulge in thoughtless sports ? Very good 
rule, but, besides its impractibilitj'^, its other 
defect spoils it : it is altogether too inclusive. 
Colleges running on this principle would soon 
find themselves missing a very large factor 



necessary to their existence. The reason is, 
we are all human — all have done more fool- 
ish things than wise ones — all will continue 
to do about as we please when amenable to no 
particular law, or to a law having no particu- 
lar penalty attached. 

Nor is this state of things so very incom- 
patible with good intentions ; it would cer- 
tainly be too much of a misrepresentation to 
say that real injury is ever intended. The 
one thing needful is this : Students must come 
to feel they are under the same restraints in 
college as out of college. That is, the strong 
arm of the civil law must be allowed to reach 
over the fence into the campus, and college 
authorities should see that those under their 
charge perfecth^ understand the situation. To 
be sure this takes away from college life a 
good deal of its romance ; we are sorry for 
that — we like romance ; we are even ro- 
mantic ourselves. But law is not romantic, 
and in discussing the province of law we must 
lay aside our own personal feelings. If such 
authority were over us, no doubt in the mo- 
ments when we do our private cursing we 
should kick at it severel3^ But then there is 
always an appreciable comfort in kicking at 
something solid — something which we know 
is for our good — which will neither take 
offense nor be kicked over. This constitutes 
the " benevolence of law." 

The old-time prejudices must die out. 
Students have been taught they are not min- 
isters of his Satanic Majesty ex officio, simply 
because they are students — they may cer- 
tainly become so if they choose, but that must 
be the result of a separate and personal com- 
pact which college presidents have no power 
to make. 

If any persons really do wish to have their 
allegiance recorded in said "Netherlands," 
they must remember that International Law 
has not yet been extended in that direction, 
and they cannot claim with us the rights of 
ex-territoriality. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



117 



But our strictures are too severe. If we 
can gather an3'thing from the drift of the 
times, the motion of progress is in the better 
direction. College papers in general have 
taken decided stands against hazing, the skel- 
etons of which have long since been picked 
to pieces in many of our colleges ; and some 
of them have taken quite as decided stands 
against the minor barbarities, such as 
" rushes," " hold-ins " and other bone-break- 
ing amusements. 

The time is surely coming — as it was 
three thousand years ago, some sceptic sug- 
gests — when a student will be considered by 
the uncharitable world as capable of being 
three things at the same time — a student, a 
responsible agent and a gentleman. If this 
sad event at Cornell should be the means of 
giving a new impulse to that spirit of reform 
already strong in the land, perhaps the death 
of Leggett will not have been in vain. 



BASE BALL. 

The first game of the term was played 
with the Bates nine at Lewiston on the 18th. 
About fifty from the different classes had ac- 
companied our nine, making, with the Bates 
men, a very enthusiastic crowd. The game 
was called at 10 o'clock. Capt. Gerry Avon 
the toss and sent his men to the field. The 
Bates men took the bat and scored a single 
run ; the Bowdoins met with similar success, 
and everything promised a close game. In 
the second inning, Gerry dislocated his knee 
while running to the second base, and Sea- 
bury, '77, was substituted ; Briggs had pre- 
viously injured his thumb, — and things 
didn't lookso promising. We succeeded, how- 
ever, in " white-washing" Bates for four suc- 
cessive innings, at the beginning of the sixth 
the score standing, Bowdoins 5 ; Bates 1. 
The game was sharp and exciting, with very 
few runs ; the Bowdoins were superior in the 
field, but Noble's adroit left-hand throwing to 



the first didn't improve their score any. In 
the sixth inning Bates scored 3 and the Bow- 
doins 1 — the game continued very exciting ; 
among the spectators betting began to be 
lively, not only on the result of the game, but 
on individual runs, first-base hits, &c. 

(A cigar vender was here kind enough to 
drop his stock in trade upon the turf, and '76 
was about to make a rush on the weeds, when 
" The Boss " branded on the box caught their 
eyes and they forbore.) At the end of the 
eighth inning the score stood 7 to 4 in our 
favor, but the Bates boys opened the " bloody" 
ninth with nine runs, and we finished the 
game without altering our score by a single 
"tally." 

Owing to a range of mountains in the left 
field, the playing in that quarter was some- 
what obstructed. Briggs and Paj'son, how- 
ever, took twodifiicult flies there, in both cases 
the " dead-red " being just distinguishable 
over the highest peak. 

The following is the score : — 



Whitman, c 2 

Wheeler, 2d b 5 

Fuller, p 3 

Bripgs, J b 4 

Wright, s. s 3 

Gerry, 3d b 3 

Payson, 1. f. 3 

Stephenson, r. f. 2 

Sanford, c. f. 2 

27 



BATES. 

O. 

Burr, c 2 

Noble, p 3 

Oakes, s. s 4 

Uall, 1 b 3 

Whitney, 2(1 b 3 

Adauis, 3d b 3 

Olayson, 1. f. 3 

Fuller, c. f. 2 

ClaysoD, r. f. 4 



2/ 13 

INNINGS. 

12 3450789 

Bowdoin 1 10 2 110 1 0— 7 

Bates 1 3 9 — 13 

Scorers — Bowdoin, W. Alden, 76. Bates, L. M. Pal- 
mer. Umpire — M. Hamlin, Lewiston. 



The Seniors have discontinued Butler's 
Analogy for the present, and are now listening 
to some very fine lectures by Prof. White, on 
Physiology. 

A Senior was guilty of the following : 
" What is the difference between the sun and 
a shooting star ? " " One is a sun (son) and 
the other a ' darter.' " He still survives. 



118 



BOfVDOm ORIENT. 



LOCAL. 

Exit ^ Hold-In." 

" Come up to Burgclorf." 

Everybody is " liard-up." 

Where are the " Prindles " ? 

How we miss the Bugle call ! 

Did you buy a match-scratcher f 

■ The bulletin board is in trouble again. 

The Appleton end-women are on a strike. 

The Faculty no longer holds night sessions. 

Are the " Lions of Judah " to be re- 
organized ? 

The " bummers " are preparing for the 
fall campaign. 

The opera will be brought out the first 
week in November. 

A swell in '77 deplores the want of " tone" 
in the fall style hats. 

Noel-Hope gave a seance dcclamatoire in 
Adams Hall on Friday evening. 

H. R. Patten, '75, and J. E. Sewall, '76, 
have returned, after a trip to Liverpool, in the 
" good ship Sterling." 

It may be very pleasant and edifying for a 
person to shout at the top of his voice as he 
passes up the, stairs. "We fail to see it, how- 
ever. How stupid in us ! 

The adjourn from drill on the last two 
days of the Topsham Fair, was gratefully re- 
ceived and duly appreciated. A number of 
the students graced the grounds with their 
presence. 

The following Seniors have been appointed 
to take part in the Senior and Junior Exhibi- 
tion, at the end of the term : Salutatory, F. 
K. Wheeler ; Orations, A. G. Bradstreet, C. 
M. Ferguson, T. Kneeland, I. S. Locke, A. L. 
Perry, T. C. Simpson, H. Gr. White. 



A sign, bearing the inscription, Madame 
Boutelle, Clairvoyant, has come to light in the 
north end of Wiuthrop. Whence it came is a 
mystery except to an F. E. W. 

Perhaps it may do very well to answer 
" Yes, Sir" to the first two or three questions, 
but when a person answers "Yes, Sir" to 
" What is the inclination of the earth's orbit 
to the plane of the eclijDtic?" it becomes very 
transparent. 

Prof. Noel-Hope gave readings both here 
and in Bath, last week. We understand he is 
to give extensive readings during the coming- 
vacation, and is in want of an agent to pre- 
cede him and prepare the way. " None but 
experienced hands need apply." 

A few evenings since, while sitting listen- 
ing to the rain as it pattered on the darkened 
panes, hurrying footsteps and the cries of 
"Freshman! Cane!" aroused us. They soon 
passed on. Probably some poor Fresh, pro- 
tected by the darkness and rain, had sallied 
forth in order to gratify his insatiable desire 
to swing a cane. Poor deluded creature ! 
Even darkness does not always cover trans- 
gressions ! 

At the College meeting for the election of 
Bugle editors, it was voted that there be 
but one editorial this year, that one to be writ- 
ten by the Senior editor. Heretofore it has 
been customary for each of the editors to try 
his hand at the editorial quiU. This, it was 
claimed, gave the Bugle a superabundance 
of reading matter, which was very singular in 
its general tone. The change will lighten the 
duties of the Junior editors very materially, 
so that this year we shall expect some new . 
features in our annual publication. 

A dark transaction. A few evenings since 
after the wind, rain, and thick darkness had 
rendered navigation difficult, two Seniors were 
haastning in the opposite direction, and in 
the same straight fine. The result was a 






BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



119 



■violent concussion. One of the parties meas- 
ured his length in the mud, while the other 
gazed anxiously around for a ball of fire which 
danced before his eyes for some seconds. He 
soon became conscious of what had happened, 
however, and for some time after wore his eye 
draped in moiu-ning in remembrance of the 
aifair. 



ALU3INI NOTHS. 

[We earnestly request contributions for this 
depiirtment from the Alumni and. friends of the 
College.] 

'37. — Albert R. Hatch is talked of as 
Democratic nominee for Governor of New 
Hampshire. 

'69. — Leavitt LothroiD, formerlj^ of Bruns- 
wick, was accidentally shot by the discharge 
of a pistol in the hands of a cai-eless compan- 
ion, on Monday, Sept. 22d. It was thought 
at first that the wound was not a fatal one, 
but it eventually proved so. He died at noon 
on the following Friday. The untimely death 
of young Lotlu'op has cast a gloom upon a 
large circle of friends and acquaintances. 
He was born in Lisbon, Me., in 1848, came 
to Brunswick in 1865, graduated from thi^ 
institution in 1869, and soon after accepted a 
position in the corps of Civil Engineers, where 
he made rapid advancement. While visiting 
friends in Louisiana he was induced to become 
a partner in a sugar plantation near New Or- 
leans, and it was here that he met his death. 
He was a young man of fine ability and prom- 
ise, of energy and moral worth, and his loss 
will be deeply felt in the society in which he 
moved. 

'71. — E. H. Lord has been elected In- 
structor in Sciences in Lowell High School. 

'73. — A. C. Fairbanks is studying music 
at the New England Conservatory, Boston. 
Room 350 Tremont St. 



Heliotype Publication 

— OF THE — 

GRAY COLLECTION 

OF — 

ENGRAVINGS 

Harvard College, 

— BT — 

JAMES R. OSGOOD & CO., Publishers, 

BOSTON. 

Messrs. James R. Osgood & Co. have the pleasure of announcing that 
by the desire of the President and Fellows of Harvard College, they are 
now pubUshing Heliotype reproductions of the principal art treasures of 
the " Gray Collection of Eogravings," owned by Harvard College. This 
Collection is one of the most complete and perfect in the country. It con- 
tains the choicest and most costly proofs of many of the best engravers of 
the world, and is especially rich in the original works of Albert Durer, 
Rembrandt, Marc-Antonio, Lukas Van Leyden, Caracci, and others. It 
comprises the best engravings of Raphael Morghen, Longhi, Toschi, Ander- 
loni, MuUer, "ffillie, Desnoyers, Maodel, Strange, Sharpe, WooUet, and 
other leading engravers, from the pictures of Raphael, Titian, Correggio, 
Guido, Leonardo da Vinci, Murillo and other celebrated artists. The por- 
traits by Velazquez, Van Dyck and others, and the engraved heads of dis- 
tinguished persons by Nanteuil, Edelinck, Masson and Houbraken are a 
most important feature of the collection. 

The publishers are enabled by means of the rapidity, faithfulness and 
artistic quality of the Heliotype ProcL-ss, to offer beautiful reproductions 
fram the choicest aud most costly works of art at the lowest possible prices. 
Rare etchings or artist-proof engravings worth hundreds of dollars each, 
may be reproduced and sold at prices varying from fifty cents to two or 
three dollars, thus bringing the treasures of art-galleries witliin the reach 
of all, and affording a means of art-education hitherto unattainable. 
About 70 subjects are now ready. 



W. T. GOODALE, PnblisherB' Agent, 

For Bowdoin College. 



FURNITURE WAREROOMS, 

No. I Arcade Building Brunswick. 

HARVEY STBTSOJSr, 

Manufacturer and Dealer in PAKLOR AND CHAMBER FURNITTIRB, 

of every description. Mattresses, Feather Beds and Feathers, Spring Beds, 
Carpets, Trunks and Valises. 
Students will always find here a first class assortment. 



BUSINESS CARDS. 



S TROUT & HOLMES, 
COUHSELOBS AT LAW, 

No. 88 Middle Street (Canal Bank Building), PORTLAND, ME. 

A. A. STBOUT. GBO. F. HOLMES ('66). 

JOSEPH A. LOCKE (Bowdoin, '65), Attorney and CounseUor at Law, 
74 Middle Street, cor. Exchange Street, PORTLAND. 



JOSIAH H. DKUMMOND (Colby, '46) CounseUor at Law, 100 Exchange 
street, PORTLAND. 



120 



BOWBOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Classical Department. 

TEEMS OF ADMISSION. 

Candidates for admission into the Freghman Class are examined as fol- 

Harkness's Latin Grammar, including Prosody; Parts I. and II. Hark- 
ness's Introduction to Latin Prose Composition*, Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Qeorgics, and six books of the ^neidj Cicero's Select Orations; Sallust. 

Hadley's or Goodwin's Greek Qranunar; Goodwin's Greek Reader; or 
Xcnophon's Anabasis, 4 books, and Homer's Iliad, 2 books. 

Arithmetic; Algebra, to equations of the second degree; Davies'a 
Legendre's Geometry, first and third books. 

£DgUsh Grammar; Ancient and Modern Geography. 

Scientific Department. 

TERMS OF ADMISSION. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the following subjects : — 
Mathematics — Arithmetic, includmg Common and Decimal Frac- 
tious, Interest, and Square Root; Algebra, to Equations of the 
Second Degree; (Jeometry, Books I. and III. of Davies's Le- 
gendre. 
Geography — Political Geography, and sunple elements of Astrono- 
mical and Phyiical Geography. 
History — Leading facts in general History, and especially in Ameri- 
can History. 
Latin — Allen's Latin Grammar, or the equivalent. 
English — The examination will consist in Ist, Reading aloud a pas- 
sage from some standard author, with explanations of gram- 
matical construction, and definition and derivation of words; 3d, 
Meriting a few sentences in English, on some familiar subject, 
reference being had to spelling and punctuation as well as to 
composition; 3d Correction^ of ungrammatical sentences com- 
posed for the purpose. 
All candidates for admission must produce certificates of their good 
moral character. 

The time for admission is the Friday after Commencement, and the 
first Thursday of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants may be 
examined at other times. 

Courses of Study. 

The regular course of Instruction is that commended by the leading 
colleges of the country as eminently adapted ,to secure Uberal culture. 

TUB SCIENTIFIC COURSE 

has been recently organized. Thirty-four students have already entered, — 
a fact which indicates that the College has been successful in its effort to 
meet the demand for a liberal course of study which shall at the same 
time look towards the actual uses and applications of knowledge. 
The studies pursued in this course are comprised in the following: — 
Languages — English one year, and optional two ; Latin one year, 
optional three ; French one year, optional three ; German one 
year, optional two ; Spanish, ItaUan, Swedish, Anglo-Saxon, one 
year. 
Mathematics — Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, Mensuration, 
Spherical Trigonometry, Analytical Geometry ; DifiFerential and 
Integral Calculus, with the application of these to Surveying, 
Navigation, Projections, Dialling, Levelling, Astronomy, Mechan- 
ics, Topographical and Hydrographical Engineering. 
Tfatural History — Geology, Mineralogy, Botany, Zoology, with their 
relations to the Industrie Arts. 



Natural Philosophy — Mechanics, Hydrodynamics, Pneumatics, 
Optics, Astronomy, Light, Heat, Electricity, Jfec. 

Chemistry — In all its branches and applications. 

History and Political Science — General, Medieval and Modern His- 
tory, Political Economy, General Principles of Law, Interna- 
tional Law, Law of Evidenee, Constitution of United States, 
Theory of Government, Americftn Law. 

Philosophy — Rhetoric, Logic, Psychology, Metaphysics, Evidences 
of Natural and Revealed Religion, Ethics, Esthetics. 

The studies of the first two years are common throughout the Depart- 
ment and are intended to lay a broad and substantial foundation for al 
branches of subsequent study. In the last two years the studies are 
arranged in distinct courses, in accordance with certain Iwding objects : a 
general scientific culture, or special technical skill. Attention is particu- 
larly invited to the faciUtiea offered for the thorough study of Civil Engi 
neering. 



A POST-GRADUATE COURSE 

of two years is also commenced, in which. Instruction will be given ia- 
he following school* : — 

I. Letters — Comprising Languages, Ancient and Modem (includ- 
ing the Oriental) with their literatures ; Philology ; Rhetoric; 
Logic ; History ; Elocution ; the Jine Arts. This leads to the 
degree of Master of Arts. 

n. Science — Advanced Mathematics, Physics, Natural History and 
Chemistry, in their uses and applications. This leads to the 
degree of Doctor of Science. 

m. Philosophy — Comprising the above, considered in their reasons 
and relations ; Psychology, Metaphysics, Ethics, Esthetics ; Poli- 
tics ; Theory of Government, Constitutional History, Principles 
of Law, International Law. Leading to the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy. 



IV. Medii 



-The Medical School of Maine. Degree, — M. D. 



Students who are not graduates will be received on satisfactory evi- 
dence of proficiency in study which will enable them to profit by this 
Course. 

Much and careftil attention is given to Physical Culture under the train 
ngof accomplished Instructors. The Gymnasium is well provided with 
approved apparatus, and the opportunities for Military drill and discipline 
are of the very best. 

It is but just to say that good morals and manliness ure distinguishing 
features of college life at Bowdoin. 

The Library of Bowdoin is one 6T rare value, and the choicest works 
are constantly added. The Gallery of Paintings is well known to be one oi 
the most remarkable in the country. The Cabinet and apparatus are 
ample for their purpose. 

The annual expenses are, for tuition, &c., $90. Board $2.50 and $4.00 
a week. Pecuniary assistance, fVom the income of thirty scholarships and 
various other benefactions, is rendered to those who are unable fully to 
meet their expenses otherwise. 

Commencement July 10th. Examination for adm^sion July 12tb and 
Aug. 2Sth, at 9 i..u. 

First term begins Aug. 38th, at evening. 

Every encouragement will be given to persons who desire to pursue 
any study taught in the College. 

The town of Brunswick, situated on tide water— Uie Androscoggin River 
on one side and the Ocean on the other ; already a seat of various manu- 
factures and destined to become one of the principal railroad centres of the 
State, easy also of access from all quarters, — ^presents an excellent locality 
for scientific as well as literary pursuits, while the fSaciiities afforded by 
Bowdoin College, its Libraries, Galleries of Art, Cabinets, Scientific Col- 
lections, Laboratories, and Apparatus, offer great inducements to the ear- 
nest student of the Useful and Liberftl Arte 



i 



Vol. III. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, NOVEMBER 12, 1873. 



No. 11. 



INCIDENTS FROM GERMAN UNIVER- 
SITY LIFE. 
By Peofessoe Caemichael. 

HI. 

We very well remember the look of sur- 
prise we encountered, when, upon our first 
arrival, we inquired the way to the University ; 
for a German University, let it be understood, 
is nowhere, everywhere. Throughout the 
city are seen traces of it ; yet, scattered as its 
buildings are, one must go far and search long 
to discover all the laboratories, observatories, 
lecture rooms, offices and museums which com- 
pose it. It is not identified with any particu- 
lar tract or city quarter. The students too, 
though manifesting a strong partiality for 
cheap streets, exhibit the greatest variety of 
tastes in the selection of their domiciles. There 
are few, if any, occasions when all the stu^ 
dents are called together, and whatever asso- 
ciations are formed are through the restaurants 
and club-houses. Every student is supposed 
to have some resort where he meets with those 
who, from intellect, rank, or from fighting or 
beer-drinking qualities, are most congenial. 
Those who do not belong to any regularly 
constituted fraternity are called " savages." 
Many of the fraternities profess to have had 
an exceedingly remote origin, and this their 
occupations certainly do not belie. Each has 
a garb peculiar to its members, who may be 
recognized at considerable distances by the 
brilliant hues with which they are supposed 
to be decorated. A new comer is called a 
" fox," and it is frequently interesting to fol- 
low the development of a shy, slouching, 
awkward lad into a fighting champion of a 
brotherhood. He comes from the gymnasium 
with white, thin face and slender form, and in 



a few weeks his cheeks are red and full, with 
here and there a sword wound. He now 
wears a small cap resembling a smoking cap, 
made of brilliant cloth, with golden spangles 
and embroiderj% and upon his back a gay 
jacket with slashings. High above his knees 
reach the great " cannon " boots, burnished to 
the last degree of perfection, and the heels are 
decorated with spurs, though he may never 
have ridden a horse in his life. He is never 
without a cane, and is frequently followed by 
a dog, who is esteemed in exact proportion to 
his physical and mental ugliness. He of course 
practices fencing, monopolizes the pavement, 
compelling the "savages" and even the ladies 
to make room, and comports himself as if the 
universe were challenged to produce his equal. 
Were there only one such hero his reign 
iipon the pavement would be complete ; but 
there are many such, and conflict is inevitable. 
Let us suppose one intentionally or accident- 
ally to touch another's arm in passing ; the 
other turns and demands an explanation, in- 
stead of which he with many bows receives a 
card; this is the challenge. 

A German duel is not nearly so dangerous 
as its name might imply. It is true that noses 
and ears are frequently hacked off, eyes gouged 
out, and cheeks scarred, but even these altera- 
tions of physiognomy, with the exception of 
the loss of eyesight, are considered far from 
undesirable. The only fatal case of which we 
have had any knowledge, is that of a by- 
stander who was struck by a flying fragment 
of sword. 

The encounters are mostly arranged, not 
to revenge any supposed insult, but in honor 
of the brotherhood. Thus, one leader boast- 
fully remarks : " We have ten men who are 



122 



BOWDOm ORIENT. 



\ 



spoiling for a fight." " Oho ! " replies the 
leader of another fraternity, " We have at 
least that many." Thereupon they pair off 
their associates, appointing the time and place 
of their combat. It may thus happen that one is 
brought to face his friend. Those who con- 
tend are generally supposed to be equally skill- 
ful in the management of their weapons. 
The swords employed in these encounters have 
thin, long blades, which are cut off squarely at 
the ends, and possess exceedingly sharp cor- 
ners. The hilt is a huge affair, covered with 
an iron basket. 

The participants must confine their attention 
to one another's faces, for their bodies are pro- 
tected by huge leather aprons ; and the older 
and more bloody and torn these become, the 
more highly are they esteemed. The eyes are 
protected by goggles without glasses, which 
protect them from blows, and prevent, as they 
are strapped tight, the flowing of blood into 
them. The sword is held with the hand raised 
high in the air, and blows are warded off sim- 
ply by swinging it from side to side. 

It will be seen that the instrument is never 
used for thrusts, as with foils, but only for 
cuts. 

The rendezvous is generally some neigh- 
boring inn, which is carefully guarded by sen- 
tinels. There Avould seem to be little need of 
this, for duels of this character are generally 
encouraged by the Government, and when the 
officers of University justice visit these fields 
of blood, they are apt to throw out beforehand 
a hint of their coming, and always find, there- 
fore, good order prevailing on their arrival. 

With their bodies encased in leather, and 
their arms thoroughly protected, the foes are 
kept separate by the two seconds, who stand 
between with crossed swords. Upon the 
signal '■'■los gelien'^ being pronounced, the 
seconds withdraw. 

The principals rush together, and then, if 
they are good swordsmen, there is a gleam of 
steel, with an occasional play of sparks, for so 



light are the weapons that they are swung 
with wonderful rapidity. All the motions 
are made with the wrist, the arm being held 
constantly above the head. It is impossible to 
follow the blows, only the effects are discern- 
able. Now and then a lock of hair, as if 
drawn by some invisible agency, suddenly 
takes flight towards the ceiling. The instant 
a cut is perceived, the seconds rush between, 
and a halt is made. The physician, who is 
always in attendance, examines the wound, j 
and, if necessary, sews it up for a fresh en- 
counter. Now follows a comical scene. The 
glory of either participant is dependent upon 
the number of cuts inflicted upon his antago- 
nist, as well as the number of times the needle 
must be employed in sewing them up. Even 
a minute scratch counts as well as a severe 
gash in augmenting the score of its fortunate 
author. Hence, the moment rest is ordered, 
each party is seized by the seconds of his 
opponent and submitted to microscopic ex- 
amination. The absurd disputes that thus arise 
are settled by an umpire previously chosen. 
The time of actual fighting is fixed at eight 
minutes, though the whole time of the con- 
test may be several hours. Should either be 
unable to hold out the appointed time, he 
loses caste among his associates, and is deprived 
of his regalia, until, by a later contest with 
a less skilful opponent, or by the exhibition of 
greater pluck, he regains them. The result of 
the duel is represented by the score, which is 
written upon a black-board ; the cuts, stitches 
and microscopic scratches being assigned pe- 
culiar values. 

Though the wounds are rarely serious they 
are frequently severe. 



[COMMDNICATIOlf.] 
To the Editors of the Orient. 

Not being a siibscriber to your paper, nor 
very well acquainted with its character, I 
hardly knew at first whether the following 
article would be appropriate to its columns 



BOWBOIN ORIENT. 



123 



or not, but I saw no other way to express 
publicly what I wish to say, and so I have 
taken this. Arriving in Brunswick on the 
6.30 train one evening a week or two ago, and 
having a little business to transact in town, 
but being obliged to hurry away as soon as it 
■was done, I determined to return on the mid- 
night train after finishing my business, as I 
knew no one in town but our venerable Prof. 
Packard and a few old citizens. I could think 
of no more pleasant way of spending my 
time than to take a stroll over the colleges, 
though 'twas a stormy, blustering night ; but 
I had not visited the place since the first class 
reunion, three years after our graduation, 
when we came back to get our " A. M.'s." 

But little could be seen in the darkness 
and rain, and yet there was a sort of inspir- 
ing sensation, a magnetic flow of emotion, in 
treading the same paths trod so many years 
ago. But, finding that I must secure a refuge 
somewhere, I suddenly thought of the old 
reading room, and visions of the pleasant 
hours I used to spend in that cosey place ku'ed 
me on to the old retreat. But I looked into 
the room where it used to be, and the unex- 
pected darkness almost startled me. " It has 
probably been moved," I thought, and stum- 
bled into another dark cavern. In coming 
away, I met a student, as I supposed, who, on 
my inquiring for the reading room, directed 
me to the room I first entered. " But you 
don't put out your lights as early as this," said 
I ; 'twas only eight o'clock. " The President 
told the student who lights the end not to 
light the reading room this term, sir, and so 
it remains in darkness." On my expressing 
my surprise and regret that it was so, he told 
me he would get me a light, and running up 
the stairs, brought down the end lamp. We 
entered : no fire on that cold blustering day ? 
" You might at least have a fire ; you need 
that even in the day time." " The President 
told Mr Booker not to make any fire here this 
term." I looked around, and of all the read- 



ing rooms I ever saw, this, the reading room 
of Bowdoin College, Avas the most cheerless, 
dirty and dilapidated. Quite a number of 
tattered papers covered the walls of the room. 
About as many more in the next stage of 
demolition strewed the floor, or were heaped 
together in the corners. The matting, rent 
and ragged, tried in vain to stretch itself out 
over the half-exposed floor. Chairs — there 
were none, but a decrepit old bench in the 
corner, benevolently offered its broken back 
to the Aveary news-reader. The long table, 
once loaded with a rich collection of the best 
magazines, now only served as a resting place 
for the papers on their fhght to the floor. 
The printed " Regulations of the Bowdoin 
Reading Room " looked down from the walls, 
in sour impotency, on the general desolation. 
" We don't take any magazines now ; the fel- 
lows steal them so, it don't pay," said the 
youth, blushing for the honor of his College. 
Has authority at Bowdoin become so pow- 
erless, and manhood at Bowdoin sunk so low ? 

Then he told me how the Reading Room 
had gradually run down ; how the students had 
wantonly abused their privileges ; how the 
Faculty seemed to think that the Institution 
was too far gone to be restored, and so were 
gently kicldng it to death ; how its dying 
hours had been soothed by delusive hopes of 
being transferred to a more congenial clime 
in the chapel building, but that these hopes 
seemed destined never to be fidfiUed. 

I went away from the room and from the 
town, but my thoughts have often returned. 
I determined at last to make an appeal, through 
your columns, to the students and to the Fac- 
ulty, for a respectable if not a handsome Read- 
ing Room. It is plain that you are the vic- 
tims of sti-angely unfortunate circumstances, or 
some one is grossly at fault. That the students 
are firet of all and most of all to be censured, 
there can be no doubt. It is time that things 
began to be called by their right names, even 
in college. It is time that the dictionary, 



124 



BOWDOIN OBIENT. 



which other men recognize, should be applied 
to students. If they are rowdies and ruffians, 
let them be called so. If they are thieves and 
miserable ^iZ/erers, don't be afraid of the term. 
AU are not guilty — only a few. But let the 
Achan in the camp, the Jonah in the ship, be 
found out, and then suffer the punishment he 
deserves, and meet the scorn of honest men. 
That the Faculty are to be censured for not 
sternly and rigidly wielding the authority they 
possess, and not setting on foot the reforms the 
students as a body cannot effect, I cannot but 
believe. I hope if you are contemplating new 
and more commodious quarters for your Read- 
ing Room, you will at once secure them, and 
then effect the reforms which seem hopeless at 
present. If I have criticised too freely what 
I am not directlj^ concerned in, I trust you 
will pardon me. An Old Graduate. 

[We cheerfully publish this communica- 
tion. Cannot something be done to carry 
out its suggestions ? — Eds. Okient.] 



ORIGIN OF "OLD GRIMES." 

In reviewing a recent English publication 
on epitaphs, Avritten by Henry J. Loaring, the 
Boston Idterary World quoted these lines : — 

Old Grimes is dead, that good old man, 

We ne'er shall see him more, 
He used to wear an old grey coat 

All buttoned down before, 

and continues : 

" Mr. Loaring claims to have discovered 
them on a tombstone in Maltham churchyard, 
Monmouthshire ; but in his version the name 
of the deceased is John Lee, not Old Grimes, 
and the color of the coat brown, not grey. 

" The late Judge Albert G. Greene has 
always been credited with the authorship of 
' Old Grimes,' etc." 

This is not the first time that the question 
of the authorship of " Old Grimes " has been 
brought to public notice. Having accidentally 
discovered the facts, we give them publicity. 
Mr. Greene was the author of all excepting 
the stanza quoted above. This stanza he 
found in some collection of English ballads, 



and seizing the idea and enjoying the humor 
of the verse, he wrote the other stanzas of 
the poem in the same conceit — the first two 
lines descriptive of the character, while the 
last two lines are descriptive of the dress of 
the old gentleman. Mr. Greene states that it 
was published in a Providence paper in 1823. 
We have, however, as yet failed to discover 
it in the Providence papers of that year. In 
the earhest republication of it which we have 
seen, it was copied from the Providence 
Gazette, but we have never found it iu that 
paper. The precise date when it was written 
we have not learned. Griswold, in his Poets 
and Poetry, says it was written in the year in 
which Mr. Greene entered Brown University. 
This was 1817, when Mr. Greene entered as 
a Sophomore. 

Samuel G. Arnold, in his eulogy delivered 
before the Rhode Island Historical Society, 
June 1st, 1869, speaks of " Old Grimes " as 
" having been thrown off for a college society 
when Mr. Greene was only sixteen years of 
age." The same statement appears in the 
necrology of Brown University, published in 
the Providence Journal in September, 1868. 
But both writers appear to be indebted for it 
to the short biographical sketch published in 
the same paper, on the 6th of January, 1868. 

By the courtesy of Mr. Guild, of Brown 
University, we were permitted to examine 
such programmes of the society celebrations 
as are preserved in the college library. We 
found that Mr. Greene frequently delivered 
poems before the societies, choosing subjects 
of American history as his themes, such as 
" The Battle of New Orleans," " The Battle 
of Bennington," etc., but we can find no 
record of " Old Grimes." — Providence Journal. 



Wittenberg College has recently added 
over $100,000 to its endowment fund. 

Alex. Agassiz, son of the great naturalist, 
has just been awarded the Walker Prize of the 
Boston Society of Natural History, for his in- 
vestigation into the embryology, geographical 
distribution and natural history of the echin- 
oderms. This prize is awarded every five 
years for the most important investigations in 
natural history during that period. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



125 



AFFAIRS OF THE BAY. 



Since the death of Juarez, Mexico has 
been all adrift again on the sea of revolution. 
Every province has had its rebellious chief; 
every peasant has been attached to some law- 
less band. The country needs some strong 
hand like that which Spain has in Castelar, to 
assert the supremacy of law. Mexico has had 
enough of license and liberty; she wants 
now a little of iron-handed despotism, a des- 
potism guided by wisdom and wielded in 
might. Who is the Cromwell to save Mexico ? 



Tlie English republican, Charles Brad- 
laugh, it is said, is not so much of a lion in 
America as one would expect. There is evi- 
dently little of the sensational in the man. 
The Boston Journal's correspondent, Burleigh, 
says of him, " He is too respectable for the rad- 
icals and too radical for the resjiectables." 

But these men, Dilke and Bradlaugh, are 
silently and in the dark quarrying the stones 
Avhich future generations are to cement with 
their blood for the structure of English Re- 
publicanism. All honor to them and their 
co-workers. The very existence of such men 
in staid, aristocratic England presages a break- 
ing-up of the old century-grown crust that 
encases her national life. 



The Senate Committee, to which was in- 
trusted the task of devising some new method 
for electing the President and Vice President, 
have apparently entered earnestly upon their 
work, and the result of their labors thus far 
has been made public and is doubtless familiar 
to our readers. The abolition of the Electoral 
College was, of course, a foregone conclusion. 
Its abuses have been long enough endured, 
the consequences to which it might lead long 
enough hazarded. The plan of dividing the 
whole country into districts, and giving to each 
district a vote for President, to be cast for the 
candidate who has the highest nimiber of votes 



in that district, is undoubtedly wise. But we 
do not see why it is necessary to retain that 
old heuioom of anti-Federalism — the princi- 
ple of the equality and sovereignty of the 
States, by which all of them, large and small, 
are granted a representation in the Electoral 
College based on their representation in the 
U. S. Senate. We recognize the principle in 
the latter case, we know, but only because it 
has been handed down from those days when 
the jealousy and disunion among the States 
made its recognition necessary. But the com- 
position of the Senate is a case not at all analo- 
gous to the election of President and Vice 
President. The latter is not an election by 
the States but by the people. By the present, 
and also by the proposed method, New York, 
which has a population thirty-five times as 
large as Delaware, casts but eleven times as 
many votes for President, or in other words, 
every man in Delaware has three times as 
much influence in the choice of President as 
any man in New York. This, it is evident, 
is not just, and neither age nor respectability 
of origin can make it so. 

The plurality rule will certainly effect a 
choice at the first trial, but it is doubtful if 
even this advantage will justify a provision 
by which a minority can so thwart the will of 
the majority merely because they are divided. 
At any rate it is evident that the Committee 
and the nation have but just entered upon the 
solution of this troublesome problem. 



Prof. J. H. Seelye of Amherst, is to de- 
liver a course of lectures at Andover Seminary 
the coming winter. 

The Medical Faculty of the University of 
Giesen have refused the application of the 
Russian female students of medicine, recalled 
from Zurich by the Imperial order, and have 
taken occasion further to express strongly 
their disapproval of women's attending lect- 
ures on such subjects. Correct. 



126 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOm ORIENT. 



PUBLISHED EVBET ALTERNATE "WTIDNESDAT DTTE- 
TSG THE COLLEGIATE YEAR AT 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE, 
By the Class of 1874. 

EDITORS. 

S. V. Cole, L. H. Kimball, 

W. T. GooDALE, D. 0. S. Lowell, 

F. W. Hawthorne, F. K. Wheeler, 

H. K. White. 

Terms — $2 00 a year in advance; single copies, 
15 cents. 

Address communications to Bowdoin Orient, 
Brunswick, Maine. 

For sale at 7 Appleton Hall, Bowdoin College. 
Also by J. Griffin and B. G. Deunison, Brunswick ; 
and A. Williams & Co., 135 Washington St., Boston. 



CONTENTS. 
Vol. III., No. 11. — Nov. 12, 1873. 

Incidents from German University Life. IK 121 

Communication 122 

Old Grimes 124 

Affairs of the Day 125 

Editorial Notes 126 

Local 127 

Editors' Table 129 

Alumni Notes 130 

Gleanings 131 

EDITORIAL NOTES. 



Prof. Carmichael has very kindly given 
us three articles on German University Life, 
which have proved very interesting and in- 
structive to all. We hope more of a similar 
nature may be forthcoming. 



the length of a recitation in college is to be. 
When they go in they would like to know 
when they are coming out. It is very incon- 
venient to have plans upset, hopes deferred, 
and worst of all, patience exhausted, by the 
continuation of recitations fifteen or twenty 
minutes after the proper time to close them. 



We can not speak too highly of Major 
Sanger's course in International Law. The 
lectures given, with the text-book as a text, 
make the subject doubly interesting. Nor is 
International Law, as such, the only subject 
discussed ; we are taught as well the principles 
of law in general, whUe special attention is 
given to the constitutions and governments of 
the leading States of the world. The lectures 
in this latter respect are not only interesting 
but exceedingly instructive, and show much 
and careful reading on the part of our in- 
structor. 



Students would lUce to know just what 



The number of Freshmen is given in the 
catalogue as seventy-four, and of these, thirty 
are in the Scientific Department. 

Among the prizes offered is a new one of 
fifty dollars for the best examination in mili- 
tary tactics. Where are the Bowdoin cadets? 

Among the awards of prizes for the past 
year, we see the " Brown Memorial Scholar- 
ship " is credited to C. J. Palmer. This is 
evidently an error. The Scholarship is offered 
annually to the graduate of the Portland High 
School having the highest rank, and Mr. 
Palmer was the successful competitor during 
the Freshman and Sophomore years ; but for 
the Junior year the prize was awarded to H. 
H. Emery. 



The first school in this country for the 
express purpose of training public speakers 
and professors of elocution, was opened at the 
new Boston University, October 21. Twelve 
students entered to take a complete course, 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



127 



and between one and two hundred others are 
to take shorter special courses. The Faculty 
consist of Prof. Lewis B. Monroe, dean, and 
seven instructors and lecturers. This is a 
move that we are glad to see. It fills a place 
in our post-graduate instruction whose vacan- 
cy has been long and deeply felt. Oru: colleges 
are miserably deficient in this regard. Elocu- 
tionary training is (and to a great extent of 
necessity) a mere side-show in both the pre- 
paratory school and the college course. The 
consequence is that there go forth from our 
colleges, every year, men of talent and schol- 
arship, who, on the platform or the stump, 
become almost subjects of ridicule. The coun- 
try needs schools of oratory ; schools exclusive- 
ly devoted to the cultivation of oratorical skill. 
The one that has been organized should and 
Avill be patronized. 



LOCAL. 

" Little Frauds." 

Who fired the cannon ? 

The College Janitor is in demand. 

W. A. Blake, '73, was in town a few days 
since. 

" She is the prettiest little ' deutscher ' in 
the town." 

Has the Bible, stolen from the Chapel, 
been returned as yet ? 

The coal and wood business is quite exten- 
sive just at present ; Muir is busy. 

Canes have been " wintered " ; the cold 
weather finds other employment for the hands. 

E. H. Kimball, '76, sailed for Savannah 
two weeks since, in the ship John H. Kim- 
ball. 

The Freshman Class boasts a Marquis and 
a Lord ; also " Giirdjian, Serope Armenag, 
Csesarea, Asia Minor." 



The Freshmen are beginning to count 
the weeks and da3's prior to the end of the 
term. Be patient. Freshmen, but two weeks 
longer. 

We hear it rumored that two Seniors have 
made engagements to accompany Noel-Hope 
as business agents on his reading tour, the 
coming vacation. 

The following Juniors have been appointed 
to take part in the Senior and Junior Exhibi- 
tion : S. M. Carter, C. L. Clarke, G. C. Cressey 
and D. M. McPherson. 

The new College Catalogue is out, and 
presents a very neat and creditable appear- 
ance. It was printed by Joseph Griffin, the 
venerable college printer. 

We noticed an error in the College Cata- 
logue. The Brown Memorial Scholarship for 
class of 1874 was awarded to H. H. Emery, 
instead of as there reported. 

The Seniors have commenced labora- 
tory work under Prof. Packard. They talk 
of and handle alkalies and acids with a 
" knowledge beyond their years." 

The Janitor is " hard pressed." His de- 
partment is overloaded. We would advise 
any having need of " carpentry " to make 
engagements at least three or four weeks in 
advance. 

The old custom of students frequenting 
the depot seems to be reviving, to a certain 
extent. 'Tis there that Seniors, Juniors, 
Sophomores and Freshmen do congregate. 
The latter of co\rrse predominate. 

The loud report of a cannon on the Col- 
lege campus roused most of us from our mid- 
night slumbers, a short time since. We 
noticed our efficient Quarter-Master carefully 
examining the guns, the next morning. No 
serious injury to them, however, has been 
re]ported up to the present time. 



128 



BOWDOm ORIENT. 



A Senior reciting in International Law 
remarked that the titles of the land grants to 
the colonies could be found in the Declara- 
tion of Independence. Another spoke of the 
revolt of the colonies as a resurrection, and of 
the participants in it as resurrectionists. 

Perhaps it would be just as satisfactory, 
especially to those rooming on the first and 
second floors, if some other " escape " for 
ashes could be devised rather than the win- 
dows. It doubtless is a little more convenient 
for those on the third and fourth floors to 
open their windows and gently scatter it on 
the ground, rather than to carry it carefully 
down three or four flights of stairs. They 
should have a little consideration, however, 
for those under them, who doubtless would 
be very happy to take it down for them should 
they but request it. It would be far better, 
however, if some method which would remove 
both of these evils could be devised. 

Exercises in the Gymnasium have been 
resumed, and are entered into, by most of the 
students, with a good deal of interest. Im- 
provements and additions have been made in 
the apparatus, and in the facilities and con- 
veniences of the dressing rooms, which are 
three in number. The building is well 
lighted, and really presents a clieering and 
inviting interior the latter part of these dark, 
bleak, cold afternoons. For convenience of 
reference we give below a printed schedule of 
the organization of the Gymnastic Depart- 
ment for 1873-4 : — 

D. A. Sargent, Superintendent ; G. H. Hun- 
ter, Assistant Superintendent; T. C. Simpson, 
Director of Exercises ; L. H. Kimball, Secre- 
tary; H. H. Emery, Superintendent of Dress- 
ing Rooms ; H. R. Sewall, Janitor. 

Senior Class. E. Gerry, Jr., Captain. 
First Division — W. T. Goodale, Leader ; H. 
Johnson, Sub-Leader and Instructor. Second 
Division — E. S. Hobbs, Leader ; H. V. Moore, 
Sub-Leader and Instructor. 



Junior Class. H. G. White, Captain. 
First Division — G. F. Harriman, Leader ; G. 
R. Swasey, Sub-Leader and Instructor. Second 
Division— W. E. Rice, Leader ; S. W. Whit- 
more, Sub-Leader and Instructor. 

Sophomore Class. W. H. Moulton, Cap- 
tain. First Division — N. J. Curtis, Leader; 
W. E. Hatch, Sub-Leader and Instructor. 
Second Division — W. G. Hunton, Leader; 
A. S. Whitmore, Sub-Leader and Instructor. 

Freshman Class. A. G. Bradstreet, Cap- 
tain. First Division — F. R. Kimball, Leader ; 
C. D. Jameson, Sub-Leader and Instructor. 
Second Division — W. Alden, Leader ; .W. A. 
Robinson, Sub-Leader and Instructor. 

Proficient Classes. C. F. Kimball, Cap- 
tain. First Class : First Division — C. H. Clark, 
Leader. Second Division — R. G. Stan wood. 
Leader. Second Class: First Division — F. 
C. Payson, Leader. Second Division — W. 
G. Waitt, Leader. Third Division — J. H. 
Payne, Leader. 



FOOT BALL. 



A meeting of college foot-ball players was 
held in New York City, Oct. 25th, composed 
of delegates from Rutgers, Yale, and Prince- 
ton, to agree upon a set of rules to govern the 
colleges named above in their matches. 

The rules adopted are as follows : — 

1. The ground shall be 400 feet long by 
250 feet broad. 

2. The distance between the posts of each 
goal shall be 25 feet. 

3. The number for match games shall be 
twenty to a side. 

4. To win a game, six goals are necessary, 
but that side shaU be considered the victor 
which, when the game is called, shall have 
secured the greatest number of goals, provid- 
ed that number be two or more. To secure 
a goal, the ball must pass between the posts. 

5. No player shaU throw or carry the ball. 
Any violation of this regulation shall consti- 



£OWI) OIN OBIENT. 



129 



tute a foiil, and the player so offending shall 
throw the ball perpendicularly into the air, to 
a height of at least twelve feet, and the ball 
shall not be in play until it has touched the 
ground. 

6. When a ball passes out of bounds it is 
a fold, and the player causing it shall advance 
at right angles to the boundary line, fifteen 
paces from the point where the ball went out, 
and shall there proceed as in Eule 5. 

7. No tripping shall be allowed, nor shall 
any player use his hands to hold or push an 
adversary. 

8. The winners of the toss shall have the 
choice of first goal, and the sides shall change 
goals at every successive inning. In starting 
the ball, it shall be fairly kicked, not babied, 
from a point 150 feet in front of the starter's 
goal. 

9. Until the ball is kicked, no player on 
either side shall be in advance of a line par- 
allel to the line of his goal, and distant from 
it 150 feet. 

10. There shall be two judges, one from 
each of the contesting colleges, and one ref- 
eree ; all to be chosen by the captains. 

11. No player shall wear spikes or ii'ou 
plates on his shoes. 

12. In all match games, a No. 6 ball shall 
be used, furnished by the challenging side, 
and to become the property of the victors. 

It is expected that Columbia wdl adopt 
these rules, but Harvard will stick to her own. 
A series of games have been played since the 
adoption of these rules, by the above-named 
colleges. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



The Yale Courant has changed hands as 
regards proprietors. It is to be enlarged in 
form, and each Department of the Uuiversity 
will be represented in the editorial Board. 
Our best wishes go with it under its new 
management. 



The Targum is a good college paper, and 
seems to be happily pursuing the even tenor 
of its wa}^ We have no particular praise to 
lavish and no particular fault to find. 

The Western Collegian is a team ! We 
hardly dare criticise. On second thought, 
however, we will venture the opinion that 
some of its editorials are veiyfai); considering 
that two ladies are on the staff of editors. 

But here comes the Dartmouth, with such 
a ministerial air as to almost frighten us from 
remarking what we were thinking of. We 
should know this publication was edited by 
Seniors and Faculty, if it did not tell us so. 
Its poetry all has a moral — but the moral is 
always good ! 

We have received St. Nicholas for Novem- 
ber, — a new illustrated magazine for boys and 
girls, published by Scribner & Co., New York, 
and conducted by Mary M. Dodge. We are 
very much pleased with this first number. The 
contents are of just such a well-selected and 
miscellaneous character as the youthful reader 
delights to have; and some of the illustrations 
are remarkably good. Celia Thaxter contrib- 
utes a pretty poem called " Under the Light- 
House," and William Cullen Bryant, Donald 
G. Mitchell, Lucy Larcom, and Lucretia P. 
Hale, appear among the other contributors. 

Is it because we are growing older, colder 
and more burden-bent, and so do not notice it, 
or is it really a fact, that college enthusiasm 
is dying out? The Madisonensis strikes a 
chord in our own feehngs when it says : " There 
is a kind of college sphit and college life 
which we are sorry to see declining. The 
members of the lower classes do not seem to 
enter with as much enthusiasm into the sing- 
ing of college songs, and the many means of 
promoting friendhness and general good feel- 
ing among their members, as have many of 
their predecessors." 

The echo of many of those old strains, 



130 



BOWDOIN OEIENT. 



whicli once animated and cheered the weary 
student, has long since died away, and we fear 
by some has been forgotten. 

And so the Cornell Era thinks nobody so 
very much to blame about it after all ! "Well, 
to be sure, the letter which it publishes, writ- 
ten by Leggett's father, and also the testimony 
given at the coroner's inquest, go a good way 
— but then ! 

We never did believe — for all the wicked 
reporters you tell us of have said — that the fra- 
ternity in question makes a practice of murder- 
ing its neo^jhytes or even torturing them ; but 
stUl we cannot yet disabuse our mind of the 
idea — perhajjs it is all prejudice — that some- 
body was to blame. For the feelings of all 
concerned we are willing the affair should go 
into oblivion ; but then it should go in a le- 
gitimate way. The covering which the Era 
draws about it seems to us a web of argu- 
ments rather tissue-y in texture and altogether 
one-sided. From two whole pages of com- 
ments and statements, the only sentence con- 
taining a breath of blame is the following, and 
that looks like a concession wrung out of dii-e 
necessity : " It cannot be denied, however, 
that members of the K. A. society Avere guilty 
of carelessness in going, during the night, 
through a country known to be cut by gorges, 
with a man blindfolded." 



ALUMNI NOTES. 



[We earnestly, request contributions for this 
department from the Alumni and friends of the 
College.] 

'31. — Thomas Baker for some time taught 

a classical school in this totvn. Mr. Baker 

removed from Brunswick to Gloucester, where 

he was engaged in teaching for some years ; 

he then taught for a time in the Bowdoin 

Grammar School of Boston, but resigned his 

place, returning again to Gloucester. Here 

he took and held until 1856 the Superintend- 

ency of schools. In 1856 he left for Austin, 



Texas, and eventually became principal teacher 
in the Blind Asylum, which position he held 
until, enfeebled with age and worn Avith work, 
his constitution gave way under a softening of 
the brain, which ended his days on the 13th 
ultimo. The deceased was an excellent in- 
structor, and a most companionable man. — 
Telegraph. 

'42.— C. M. Blake, ex-Chaplain United 
States Army, is at present teaching in Yount- 
ville, Napa Co., California. 

'53. — Rev. John Franklin Spaulding of 
Erie, Pennsylvania, was elected last week, in 
New York, Missionary Bishop of Colorado, 
Wyoming and New Mexico, in place of the 
Right Rev. G. M. Randall, n.n., deceased. 
The Bishop elect was born in Maine and grad- 
uated at Bowdoin, class of 1853. He has 
been Rector of St. Raid's Church for ten 
years, has added largely to the membership of 
his own church, and organized in the vicinity 
of Erie, four churches, besides engaging in all 
missionary enterprises within his reach. " His 
age is 42 years. His qualifications for this 
new position are thought to be of a very high 
order." So says the New York Observer. — 
Telegraph. 
To the Editors of the Orient. 

The visits of your periodical are always 
welcome, and doubly so when the Alumni de- 
partment is well filled. That is always looked 
at first, and read with the most interest — 
giving all due credit, however, to your locals 
and editorials. Receiving the last number 
with no intelligence relating to the graduates 
of Bowdoin, I was reminded of a neglected 
duty. Last Commencement the few members 
of '72 present, held an informal class meeting 
to listen to the reading of a communication 
from their Secretary. The class then voted 
to instruct me to revise it, and furnish The 
Oeient a copy for publication. 

Abbott — Spent a portion of a year in 
Europe, studied law and has been admitted to 
the bar ; has since " gone West." 



BOWDOIN OBIENT. 



131 



Acldey — Teaching at Peak's Island, Port- 
land Harbor, is married and a parent. Ackley, 
alwaj's talcing prizes in athletic sports, now 
becomes entitled to the class cup. 

Atwood — Married and teaching at Hing- 
ham, Mass. 

Biclvford — Married ; taught nearly a year, 
and now preaching at Patten, Maine. 

Coggan — Married, and having excellent 
success as Principal of Nichols Academy, 
Dudley, Mass. 

Cummings — At Portland, studying medi- 
cine. 

Dow — Studying law in New York City. 

Frost — Teaching at Thomaston, Maine. 

Gross — Teaching, one report says, at Nor- 
walk, Conn. ; another in New Jersey. 

Harris — Has decided to make music his 
profession. At present studying in Boston. 

Heath — Assistant Secretary of Maine 
Senate in 1872-3, at present Principal of 
Washington Academy, East Machias. 

Hooker — Went to Italj^ on graduation, 
returned to Maine, and when last heard from 
had sailed again for Liverpool. 

Lewis — Principal Gardiner High School. 

Meads — Preaching at Bath. (?) 

Richards — Teaching the Calais High 
School. 

Eicker — In the leather business, Portland. 

Rogers — Married ; has taught since grad- 
uation at Blue Hill Academy and Hampden. 

Seiders — Teaching the Cumberland Gree- 
ley Institute. 

Shannon — Studying medicine in New 
York City. 

Spaulding — Studying medicine at Bing- 
ham. 

Stone — Not been heard from. 

Whitaker — A husband and parent. Edi- 
tor of SoutJibridge (Mass.) Journal. 

H. Wilder — Principal of the Barre (Mass.) 
Academy. 

Yours with respect, 

Class Secretary. 



aLEANINGS. 

Rutgers means to send a crew to the next 
Regatta. 

Cornell has 209 Freshmen, Harvard 184, 
Yale 130, Rochester 56, Union 44, Syracuse 40. 

Prof. J. Norman Lockyer's long-expected 
book on the sun, has at last appeared, pubhsh- 
ed by McMillan Bros. 

John B. Gough's lecture at Boston a week 
or two ago, was his three hundred and sixty- 
niath appearance in that city. 



Heliotype Publication 

— OF THE — 

GRAY COLLECTION 

— OF — 

ENGRAVINGS 

Harvard College, 

— ny — 

JAMES R. OSGOOD & CO., Publishers, 

BOSTON. 

Messrs. James R. Osgood & Co. have the pleasure of annouocing that 
by the desire of the President and Fellows of Harvard College, they are 
now publishing IleliotjTje reproductions of the principal art treasures of 
the " Gray Collection of Engravings," owned by Harvard College. This 
Collection is one of the most complete and perfect in the country. It con- 
tains the choicest and most costly proofs of many of the best engravers of 
the world, and is especially rich in the original works of Albert Durer, 
Rembrandt, Marc-Autonio, Lukas Van I^eyden, Caracci, and others. It 
comprises the best engravings of Raphael Morghen, Longhi, Toschi, Ander 
loni, Muller, 'Willie, Desnoyers, Mandcl, Strange, Sharpe, Woollet, and 
other leading engravers, from the pictures of Raphael, Titian, Correggio, 
Guido, Leonardo da Vinci, Murillo and other celebrated artists. The por- 
traits by Velazquez, Van Dyck and others, and the engraved heads of dis- 
tinguished persons by Nanteuil, Edelinck, Masson and Houbraken are a 
most important feature of the collection. 

The publishers are enabled by means of the rapidity, faithfulness and 
artistic quality of the Heliotype Process, to offer beautiful reproductions 
from the choicest and most costly works of art at the lowest possible prices. 
Rare etchings or artist-proof engravings worth hundreds of dollars each, 
may be reproduced and sold at prices varying from fifty cents to two or 
three dollars, thus bringing the treasures of art-galleries within the reach 
of all, and affording a means of art-education hitherto unattainable. 
About 70 subjects are now ready. 

Special prices made with Colleges and Institutions of Learning. Nearly 
10,000 prints have been sold to the students of Harvard. 

"W. T. GOODAIiE, Pu1>lislLers* Agent, 

For Bowdoin College. 



132 



BOWBOm ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Classical Department. 

TEEMS OF ADMISSION. 

Candidates for admission into the Freshman Class are examined as fol- 
ows : — 

Harkness's Latin Grammar, including Prosody; Parts I. and 11. Hark- 
ncss's Introduction to Latin Prose Composition; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgics, and sLx books of the iEneid; Cicero's Select Orations; Sallust. 

Hadlcy's or Goodwin's Greek Grammar; Goodwin's Greek Reader; or 
Xcnophon's Anabasis, 4 books, and Homer's Iliad, 2 books. 

Arithmetic; Algebra, to equations of the second degree; Davies's 
legendre's Geometry, first and third books. 

English Grammar; Ancient and Modern Geography. 



Scientific Department. 

TEEMS OF ADMISSION. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the following subjects : — 
Mathematics — Arithmetic, includmg Common and Decimal Frac- 
tions, Interest, and Square Rootj Algebra, to Equations of the 
Sjcoud Degree; Geometry, Books I. and HI. of Davies's Le- 
ge ndre. 
Geography — Political (Jeography, and simple elements of Astrono- 
mical and Physical Geography. 
History— Leading facts in general History, and especially in Ameri- 
can History. 
Latin — Allen's Latin Grammar, or the equivalent. \ 

English— The examination will consist in 1st, Reading aloud a pas 
sage from some standard author, with explanations of gram' 
matical construction, and definition and derivation of words; 2d' 
JVriting a few sentences in English, on some familiar subject 
reference being had to spelling and punctuation as well eis to 
composition; 3d Correction^ of ungrammatical sentences com- 
posed for the purpose. 
All candidates for admission mxist produce certificates of their good 
moral character. 

The time for admission is the Friday after Commencement, and the 
first Thursday of the first term. In exceptional cases applicanta may be 
xamined at other times. 



Courses of Study. 

The regular course of Instruction is that commended by the leading 
colleges of the country as eminently adapted^to secure liberal culture. 

THE SCIENTIFIC COURSE 

has been recently organized. Thirty-four students have already entered, — 
a fact which indicates that the College has been successful in its effort to 
meet the demand for a liberal course of study which shall at the same 
time look towards the actual uses and appUcations of knowledge. 
The studies pursued lu this course are comprised in the following: — 
Languages — English one year, and optional two ; Latin one year, 
optional three ; French one year, optional three ; -German one 
year, optional two } Spanish, Italian, Swedish, Anglo-Saxon, one 
year. 
Mathematics — Algebra, Geometiy, Trigonometry, Mensuration, 
Spherical Trigonometry, Analytical Geometry ; Differential and 
Integral Calculus, with the application of these to Surveying, 
Navigation, Projections, Dialling, Levelling, Astronomy, Mechan- 
ics, Topographical and Hydrographical Engineering. 
Natural History — Geology, Mineralogy, Botany, Zoology, with their 
relations to the Industrial Arts. 



Natural Philosophy — Mechanics, Hydrodynamics, Pneumatics 
Optics, Astronomy, Light, Heat, Electricity, &c. 

Chemistry — ^In all its branches and applications. 

History and Political Science— General, Medieval and Modern His- 
tory, Political Economy, General Principles of Law, Interna, 
tional Law, Law of Evidence, Constitution of United States, 
Theory of Government, Ameriten Law. 

Philosophy — Rhetoric, Logic, Psychology, Metaphysics, Evidences 
of Natural and Revealed Religion, Ethics, Esthetics. 

The studies of the first two years are common throughout the Depart- 
ment and are intended to lay a broad and substantial foundation for al- 
branches of subsequent study. In the last two years the studies are 
arranged in distinct courses, in accordance with certain leading objects : a 
general scientific culture, or special technical skill. Attention is particu- 
larly invited to the facilities offered for the thorough study of Civil Engi 
neering. 



A POST-GRADUATE COURSE 

of two years is also commenced, in which Instruction will be given in 
he following schools: — 

I. Letters — Comprising Languages, Ancient and Modem (includ- 
ing the Oriental) with their Uteratures ; Philology ; Rhetoric; 
Logic ; History ; Elocution ; the Fine Arts. This leads to the 
degree of Master of Arts. 

n. Science— Advanced Mathematics, Physics, Natural History and 
Chemistry, in their uses and appUcations. This leads to the 
degree of Doctor of Science. 

m. Philosophy — Comprising the above, considered in their reasons 
and relations ; Psychology, Metaphysics, Ethics, Esthetics ; Poli- 
tics ; Theory oT Government, Constitutional History, Principles 
of Law, International Law. Leading to the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy. 

rv. Medicine— l^he Medical School of Maine. Degree, — M. D. 

Students who are not graduates will be received on satisfactory evi- 
dence of proficiency in study which will enable them to profit by this 
Course. 

Much and careful attention is given to Physical Culture under the train 
ngof accomplished Instructors. The Gymnasium is well provided with 
approved apparatus, and the opportunities for Mihtary drill and discipline 
are of the very best. 

It is but just to say that good morals and manliness are distinguishing 
features of college life at Bowdoin. 

The Library of Bowdoin is one of rare value, and the choicest works 
are constantly added. The Gallery of Paintings is well known to be one ot 
the most remarkable in the country. The Cabinet and apparatus are 
ample for their purpose. 

The annual expenses are, for tuition, &c., $90. Board $2.50 and $4.00 
a week. Pecuniary assistance, from the income of thirty scholarships and 
various other benefactions, is rendered to those who are unable fully to 
meet their expenses otherwise. 

Commencement July 10th. Examination for admission July 12th and 
Aug. 28th, at 9 a.m. 

First term begins Aug. 28th, at evening. 

Every encouragement will be given to persons wha desire to pursue 
any study taught in the College. 

The town of Brunswick, situated on tide water — the Androscoggin River 
on one side and the Ocean on the other ; already a seat of various manu- 
factures and destined to become one of the principal railroad centres of the 
State, easy also of access from all quarters,— presents an excellent locaUty 
for scientific as well as literary pursuits, while the facilities afforded by 
Bowdoin College, its Libraries, Galleries of Art, Cabinets, Scientific Col- 
lections, Laboratories, and Apparatus, offer great inducements to the ear- 
nest student of the Useful and Liberal Arts 



Vol. III. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, DECEMBER 3, 1873. 



No. 12. 



THE FISHER'S "WIFE. 

She walked to the shore in the dead midnight, 
And heard the wild waves breaking; 

The coast line was drawn away under the surge, 
And the sea-beat ground was shaking. 

"Will he come to-night through the terrible sea?" 

And her heart within her sorrowed. 
How the crested waves loomed like monks in black 

That showed but the white of their forehead ! 

"No, not to-night through the terrible sea; 

And the sky is as black as a letter ! 
But he '11 think of his wife and darlings three, 

And wish hiin at home the better." 

Oh ! why was the sky in that bleak midnight 

Barred up with clouds of iron ! 
Or why did the winds wreck human hopes 

For human hearts to sigh on ! 

I know not : but fishermen must be brave 
To earn their bread for the morrow ; 

And fishermen's wives must keep the home, 
And watch and pray — and sorrow. 

Through the terrible, terrible sea he came, 
But the monks on the black sea river 

Had drawn him away in the folds of their cloaks 
From his loved and his lost forever. , , 

-- H, T. 



TO-MOKROW. 

TVe travel toward the sunset, yet alway 
An angel goes before us, singing some glad thyme 
Of fair Utopian days, some golden time 
That we shall know; oh, very sweet and strong 
Is her glad song. 

Our roses wither, dropping from our hands; 
Against sharp stones we bruise our weary feet; 
But say she hath new roses, far more sweet 
Than these; with her some magic balm is found 
To heal this wound. 

As she goes smiling, singing as she goes, 
"We cry. How beautiful she is! how bright! 
The light upon her is the morning light, — 
And hope, as recompense for all our sorrow. 
Some glad to-morrow. 



■We strive to grasp her, thinking that her hands 
Are full of treasures, beautiful and meet 
To use; but when we stand whereon her feet 
Have stood, she is not there, but evermore 
Flitteth before. 

And by-and-by we find some gifts she leaves 
Are not the ones our eyes would fain behold : 
Ashes for beauty, and poor dross for gold ; 
Yet He proclaims it good, who holds as one 
The shadow and the sun. 

At last she leads us to some quiet place, 
And takes her leave, though grown perhaps more dear, 
"While we, watching, with vision strong and clear, 
Her flitting backward, as she walked before. 
Behold her nevermore. 

E. L. I. 



WHAT WAS IT? 



It "was Saturday night, and rather late. 
Monday's lessons were unlearned, of course ; 
for, having had all day to prepare them in, I 
had deferred them from one hoiu' to another, 
and though conscience clamored for the pro- 
saic routine of study, I sat in mj' easy chair, 
reading poetry and building chateaux en Us- 
pagne. The poet whose works I held was a 
son of Bowdoin, and as I followed him from 
the height of sublimitj'^ to the depth of pathos, 
I wondered if he was ever like other men — 
if, for instance, he ever sat up Saturday night 
and read poetry. I fancied he did, though, 
being a wise man, he doubtless got his lessons 
first. 

Now, don't imagine that I meant to draw 
a parallel between myself and him, but as we 
were both human, I reasoned that there might 
be a point in our careers that would coincide 
— perhaps this was the one — but while I 
returned on the circumference of my own 
narrow circle of ideas, he would shoot off into 
the infinity of thought. Thus it is evident to 



134 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



the reader that I considered him no parallel, 
but a — well, a tangent or a radius, I don't 
know which — I believe they are geometrical 
synonyms. 

As I alternately read, and reflected, I came 
upon the following : — 

"All houses wherein men have lived and died 
Are haunted houses; Through the open doors 
The harmless phantoms on their errands glide 
With feet that make no sound upon the floors; 
"We meet them at the doorway, on the stair; 
Along the passages they come and go, 
Impalpable impressions in the air, 
A sense of something moving to and fro." 

Had I read those lines among the antijjodes 
they would doubtless have passed unnoticed, 
but under the circumstances, they suggested 
strange fancies. " Surely," thought I, " quot 
homines, tot sententice have lived in these halls ! 
Probably some are dead and running at large 
by this time, and what would be more natural 
than to revisit these "familiar scenes, at some 
favorable hour like this?" The thought 
was startling. I fancied I felt the "sense of 
something" — ^yes, I was sure I did — .though 
whether moving " to and fro" or up and down 
was not quite so certain. It was a peculiarly 
tantalizing uncertainty. An entity, or even 
a visible non-entity, would have been more 
satisfactory. Had Poe's raven or Lenore's 
ghost stalked in at the open window, they 
Avould have been welcome. I glanced at the 
clock to mark the hour, when I became con- 
scious of a singular metamorphosis in its usual- 
ly regular appearance. It had just clasped 
hands at XII, when of a sudden it extended 
them towards me ; the click of the pendulum 
sounded muffled like the beating of a heart ; 
the door flew open, and out stepped a little 
elf about six inches high. 

" Ha ! ha ! " laughed the little man. " Ha ! 
ha! ha-a-a-a-a!" and he ran off in a cachin- 
nation so sharp and rapid that I fancied he 
was running down. At length he stopped 
and beckoned with his hand: "Come," said 
he. I hesitated. 



"Come," said he again, stamping impa- 
tiently. 

"But," said I, "who are j'ou?" 

" O, I am part of the essence of Time. I 
keep your clock alive. Clocks are like men, 
nothing but machines. When this one dies 
I shall take another — transmigration — joix 
know — come." 

I hadn't quite decided whether I knew or 
not, but I couldn't conveniently resist his 
invitation, and so I arose and followed. He 
opened a door in the chimney that I never 
remembered having seen before, and we went 
in. We then seemed to be nowhere in par- 
ticular, and in the central part stood a tele- 
scope beside which Lord Rosse's would have 
dwindled into a pocket lens. My guide led 
me to the eye-piece and said : " Look and ob- 
serve the parallax." 

I looked and observed what appeared to 
be a Mississippi flat-boat, loaded with Verte- 
brates and Protozoans, who were engaged in a 
heated discussion. My companion said they 
were disputing over the intrinsic merits of the 
follicles of Lieberkuhn, and as they drifted 
slowly within hailing distance, he handed me 
a pistol and told me to fire. I asked the rea- 
son, and he said because of the belligerent 
rights they were exercising, it was my duty, 
as ambassador extraordinary, to fire the afSrm- 
ing gun. 

Thereupon I seized the deadly weapon, 
took good aim through the telescope and fired. 
There was a cloud of smoke, a crash of 
broken glass, mingled with howls and yells as 
though Pandemonium had broken loose ; when 
suddenly my guide produced a wand, with 
which he smote thrice upon the ground, and 
quiet was restored. He waved it mysterious- 
ly over his head, and from the ruins of the 
shattered boat rose Phoenix-like a capacious 
building. By parthenogenesis the shattered 
lenses of the telescope multiplied, and then of 
a sudden changed to bottles filled with curious 
liquors and fluids, and assumed positions on 



BOWD OIN ORIENT. 



135 



shelves around the newly fabricated edifice. 
In the centre of the room the carapace of a 
turtle, supported by the legs of a buffalo, did 
service as a chemist's table, which was loaded 
with agents and reagents, while the hoofs and 
horns of the recent passengers of the flat-boat 
fused in a corner of the room, from which 
arose extremely pungent odors, that passed 
through a tortuous tube, and entered a capa- 
cious chamber in fantastically cuiwed wreaths 
that seemed to spell H(NH4;0. 

Unearthly odors arose on eveiy hand, 
among Avhich I recognized as especially prom- 
inent ray old friend H2S. 

My guide now brought me a mixture, 
whose color would have made Egyptian dark- 
ness appear like alabaster, and told me to 
analyze it. It was labeled " The Future — 
Class X." By analogical reasoning I conclud- 
ed that P2S5 would be the necessary reagent, 
which I accordingly applied. Thereupon a 
cloudy pillar ascended from the phial, wliich 
on coming to the air assumed the form of a hu- 
man figure, holding a rectangular jmsm in his 
right hand. He reminded me forcibly of the 
Eastern genie whom the peasant thoughtlessly 
released ; and I was meditating how to induce 
him to return, and neutralize him with an 
acidulated alkali, when he spoke: — 

" Mortal, what would you ?" 

"The Future," I replied. 

"0, foolish one," said he, "judge of the 
Future by the Past." 

"Ah, that I would," I cried, "if I only 
knew the career of those who have dwelt 
within my chamber.'' 

" Look, then," he said, and he held toward 
me one of the faces of his prism. I looked, 
and there in golden letters I beheld a name 

" Tbat ueeds but to be mentioned to be praised." 

Surely, thought I, tliis is a good omen; 
but even as I gazed he turned another side 
toward me, and there, instead of a single 
name, were scores. I read them carefully, 
but found no one of merit, and as I ended. 



the whole faded away, and instead of them 
remained three words : — 

"unknown, unnoticed, unrenowned." 
"Is this the Past?" I cried. "Then let 
me know the Future quickly ! " 

There was a moment's delay, and then the 
figure slowly turned toward me the remaining 
side. 

But no name was written thereon, and in 
its burnished blackness I saw nothing save the 
reflection of my own features. 

Pyrth. 



THE LIFE SONG. 

Tou say you ■watched the great musician's hand 
Striking the keys and calling up sweet sounds ; 
The song was blithe at first, then low and grand, 
Like a deepening stream out-rolling from the hounds 

Of sunlight under shadowing trees; and there 
Were clouds arising iu the sky behind, 
^nrt unseen voices crying in the air, 
And deathlike wailing iu the nightly wind. 

Your soul was lifted to the stars ! your thought 
Of deathless fame escaped you in a sigh, 
That if to sing .such song might be yonr lot. 
By which men would remember, you could die. 

You wished, not knowing of the master's art. 
And how his soul was drawn into bis song. 
And how his life was bursting from his heart. 
And how the memories held him now death-strong. 

JSTot knowing of the master's art, your sigh. 
The semblance of the wish, was not in vain ; 
As under untouched keys a melody 
Sleeps in your heart, waiting the hand of pain. 

For life itself must be your grand sweet song ; 
Yours is the sentence, and your own right baud 
Must bring you sufferings and pain : be strong : 
Such are the things that made his sweet song grand. .4 

H. T. '^ ' 



THE "TELEGRAPH" AND THE 
DRILL. 

Many of our readers have read and men- 
tally answered the TelegrapK s criticism on the 
petition. For ourselves we wish to say some- 
thing, both in regard to this article and in 
general defence of the petition. 



136 



BOWBOIN ORIENT. 



The" editor meets us on the very threshold, 
and at once disputes our right to enter even 
the outer court in the attitude of humble pe- 
titioners. We thought the right of petition 
had been secured way back in 3Iagna Charta 
times, but here is a man right in the nineteenth 
century showing himself far behind in his ap- 
preciation of individual rights even the old 
barons of England six hundred years ago. 

We regard the petition as an extraordi- 
nary step, not because in it we transgress the 
limits of rights, but because rarely, if ever 
before, has the exigency demanded the exer- 
cise of this right. We were about' to say 
"this extreme right," but we remember we 
have rights even beyond this — rights which 
we hope may never be called into exercise. 
The editor of the Telegraph makes no dis- 
tinction between students in a common school 
and students in college. There is a decided 
distinction. We claim to be men and our 
right to be treated as men. Notwithstanding 
the slurs of the Telegraph,., and its intimations 
that we are a class of miserable subordinates, 
■ expected to do our work and eat our food like 
horses and oxen and say nothing more about 
it, however egotistic and arrogant it may be, 
we do claim to be gifted with common sense 
and ordinary intelligence. 

We do claim that we have something to 
say about our course of study and the ex- 
ercises of College — quite as much at least as 
outsiders. 

We do indeed waive our rights in deference 
to the superior wisdom of our teachers and 
trustees, but those rights remain nevertheless, 
and they remain to be exercised, at our dis- 
cretion. But this discussion about our rights 
is perhaps needless, for fortunately the Trustees 
and Overseers have no disposition to ignore 
them. 

The Telegraph assumes at ouce that the 
few brief sentences of the petition embody 
the whole argument against the drill, and with 
drawn sword and uplifted arm, it charges upon 



it as though at last it had an antagonist 
worthy of its steel. 

We fear many have entertained the same 
idea with reference to the petition. 

Unless we have very much mistaken the 
meaning and scope of a petition, it would be 
inappropriate to make it the vehicle of our 
logic and rhetoric. It was not written in any 
such spirit, with any intent to " argue " the 
Boards into our way of thinking. It was 
only intended to express, in the briefest man- 
ner possible, some of the strongest and best 
grounded reasons against the drill. 

And again, it could not embrace all these, 
but only such as all could agree upon. It was 
not a summary of reasons against the drill, but 
of the reasons which induced the presentation 
of the petition, and as each man had his own 
reasons for his individual action, only those 
could be given which were common to all. 

The Boards have asked for a written state- 
ment of the reasons against the drill, and if 
it is prepared we have no objection to its be- 
ing treated as our case. 

With regard to the arguments- of the Tel- 
egraphy we consider them altogether too friv- 
olous and unimportant to demand a reply. 



AFFAIRS OF THE BAY. 



It is certainly a refreshing spectacle to see 
rascals and cut-throats, like Tweed and Stokes, 
at last given over to the State Prison authori- 
ties. People will not lose all faith in New 
York juries after these two verdicts. To be 
sure the finding in the case of Stokes was 
miserably incommensurate with his great 
crime. It is difficult to see how, in regard to 
an act so manifestly premeditated, a jury of 
ordinary common sense could bring a verdict 
of murder in the third degree — that is, mur- 
der committed in the heat of passion. It is 
said, too, that Tweed's sentence will be but 
slight, and he is represented as being quite 
cheery over his prospects. But people will be 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



137 



so relieved to know that both criminals are 
suffering some punishment, that they will 
hardly complain of its inadequacy. 



The Virginias affair, however it may affect 
Cuba and our interests in the West Indies, 
will doubtless have an important bearing in 
settling mooted questions of international law. 
Already it is evident that the best authorities 
differ in regard to the legahty of her capture, 
and where those who are perfectl}' familiar 
with every settled principle of international 
law are at vaiiance, it is evident that there 
are no settled principles. Among the subjects 
to a discussion of which this affair will doubt- 
less lead, are the belligerent rights of rebels, 
the effect of their recognition or non-recog- 
nition on the duties and obligations of neu- 
trals, and the proper time for sucli recognition 
on their part. It seems to be the most import- 
ant question in regard to the Virginias, 
Avhether the non-recognition of the belliger- 
ency of the insurgents on our part and the 
part of Spain, would preclude the possibility 
of such a thing as "carrying contraband of 
Avar," and consequentlj' make the vo3'age of 
the Virginias perfectly legal. There is no 
doubt but that the vessel had on board what 
in a state of war would have been contraband, 
and the only question is, " Was there a state 
of war? " It seems to us that the law of na- 
ture and the principles of equitj"- on Avhich 
international law claims to be founded, de- 
mand that when there is a war de facto the 
obligations of neutrals should be as stringent 
and as fully binding as in a war between sove- 
reign States. Belligerent rights and neutral 
duties should, spring into existence the mo- 
ment a gun is fired or a sword drawn, where- 
ever the contest or whoever the contestants. 
The laws of war were not framed to regulate 
the intercourse of sovereign States, bat to 
mitigate the rigor of military operations ; and 
Avherever there are such operations, those laws 
should be applied. 



But this will be the theme of future dip- 
lomats. 



From a recent editorial in the Targum re- 
ferring to Leggett's death we clip the follow- 
ing:— 

Bat by far the ablest opinions we have 
seen on the subject, are those of President 
White, of Cornell. They were fully express- 
ed in a speech he delivered before the stu- 
dents a few Aveeks ago, showing, that while 
Secret Societies might be an injury, they 
might also be a positive benefit to the College 
with which they were connected. He closed 
his address with the resolutions unanimously 
adopted by the Regents of Cornell. We an- 
nex them in toto, as they are of interest even 
to the students of Rutgers, as the first steps 
taken by any institution towards a closer un- 
ion of a College with the secret societies which 
are so indissolubly connected with much of 
student life and can but benefit both mutually. 
They are as follows : — 

Eesolved, That no secret society shall be allowed 
to be established or rcraain in tlio University which 
shall not be shown to the satisfaction of the faculty 
to be favorable to scholarship, good order and mor- 
ality, and to bo free from all initiation or other rnles, 
ceremonies or proceedings, dangerous, degrading or 
unworthy of gentlemen and members of an institu- 
tion of learning. 

Bcsolved, That no student be allowed to become 
or to remain a member of any society publicly com- 
demned by the faculty ; and no person shall receive 
an honorable dismission or any degree, who shall 
not. at the time of applying for the same, satisfy the 
faculty that he has not violated this rule. 

Resolved, That no association of students for the 
mere purpose of initiation, or mock societies, shall 
bo allowed in this University ; and that any student 
who shall join any such association or mock society, 
knowing it to be such, or engage in any of its initi- 
ation proceedings, or in any proceedings of the na- 
ture of mock initiation, shall be suspended or ex- 
pelled from the University. 

Bcsolved, That nothing contained in these reso- 
lutions shall be held to restrict the faculty from 
further action regarding college societies of various 
sorts, should the present action be found ineffectual. 



The new buildings of the Classical School 
at Hallowell are to be dedicated soon. 

Ex-Gov. Coburn did a good thing for Colby 
University, if he made his will leaving her a 
million dollars. Did he, as reported ? 



138 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WISDNESDAY DUR- 
LNG THE COLLEGIATE YEAR AT 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE, 
By THE Class of 1874. 

EDITORS. 

S. V. Cole, L. H. Kimball, 

W. T. GoODALE, D. 0. S. Lowell, 

F. W. Hawthorne, F. K. Wheeler, 

H. K. White. 

Terms — $2 00 a year in advance; single copies, 
15 cents. 

Address communications to Bowdoin Orient, 
Brunswick, Maine. 

For sale at 7 Appleton Hall, Bowdoin College. 
Also by J. Griffin and B. G. Dennison, Brunswick ; 
and A. Williams & Co., 135 Washington St., Boston. 



CONTENTS. 
Vol. III., No. 12. — Dec. 3, 1873. 

The Fisher's Wife. (Poem.) 133 

To-Morrow. (Poem.) 133 

What Was It ? 133 

The Life Song. (Poem.) 135 

The " Telegraph " and the Drill 135 

Affairs of the Day 136 

Editorial Notes 138 

Editors' Table 141 

Local 141 

Alumni Notes 142 

Gleanings 143 

EBlTORIAJj NOTES. 



The concert which introduced the present 
course of lectures is very highly spoken of by 
those who were fortunate enough to be 
present. We expected such good report, and 
regretted our inability to attend, remembering 



the reputation of the Beethoven Quintette 
Club, and the praises which Mrs. Osgood Avon 
among us at Commencement. 



Why has not something been done about 
society " fishing," as was attempted at the 
end of last term ? It seems to us the matter 
should not lie on the table till another fishing 
season, or the same unforeseen contingency 
may put it there another year, and so on for- 
ever. It would be a real reform to adopt the 
spirit, if not the letter, of the proposed rules 
and regulations. 



It is a lamentable fact, but true neverthe- 
less, that winter has begun his annual visit. 
The last term has been remarkable for " In- 
dian Summer " days (real ones), and for beauti- 
tiful weather generally ; but the last two days 
of its existence saw a snow storm worthy of a 
good place in January. 

The campus, untrod by human feet in 
these latter days, looks but a waste and barren 
land. 



We look forward with much pleasure to 
the instruction in Metaphysics next term. 
For that important branch of the Senior 
studies, '74 has been peculiarly fortunate in 
the teacher which has been promised them. 
Dr. Hopkins is certainly the man who needs 
no recommendation for the class room, and 
out of the class room we understand his in- 
terest in the student is somewhat more than 
teachers ordinarily manifest. 



The Amherst students have for lecturers 
this winter, Chas. Bradlaugh, Henry Ward 
Beecher, T. W. Higginson, Wendell Phillips, 
Jas. E. Murdock and John B. Gough. We 
see no reason why Bowdoin should not have 
such men in her lecture courses. We have 
had enough of second- or third-rate lecturers. 
A first-class course could be made a pecuniary 
success too. Cheap shows never make the 



BOWBOIN ORIENT. 



139 



most money. Students and citizens would be 
willing to pay more if they were satisfied tKe 
entertainments merited it. 



We are ver)' sorry that the Seniors arrived 
at no satisfactory settlement of their class 
differences before the term ended. They 
ought to have been settled long ago, but the 
vacation has closed in upon us and the work 
is still undone. Things remain in that very 
easy condition best described as in statu quo, 
or looking at the matter in a belligerent as- 
fiect, 171 statu quo ante helium. 

The prospect now is that Bowdoiu will 
see no Class Day next Commencement. 



Hon. John P. Hale, whose obituary ap- 
pears in the present number, is said to have 
been a man of ready wit. The following in- 
cident is related of him, and will serve as an 
illustration. 

He was making one of his abolition 
speeches in the U. S. Senate, when a member 
from Micliigan, not ajDpreciating his remarks, 
loudly interrupted with : " I think we have 
heard enough from the New Hampshire 
goose." " I think so too," replied Mr. Hale, 
making a short pause, "and now we will hear 
from the great "i^lichyjander." 



In the Educational Department of the 
Vienna Exposition, Vassar College was rep- 
resented by a paper prepared by President 
Raymond, giving the history, plan, and pres- 
ent status of the institution. 

The Miscellany says : " We are glad to have 
our College introduced in so able a treatise 
to the world, and to show to our European 
neighbors the higher educational standard to 
which American women are trying to rise." 

We, too, are glad to see that this educa- 
tional experiment is in the hands of a man 
who comprehends the greatness of the plan 
and has the energy and enthusiasm to carry it 



to success. We believe that Vassar embodies 
the true theory of female education. Would 
that every State in the Union had its counter- 
part. It is a mistaken step — a step that will 
have to be retraced — to admit to our male 
colleges female students, but let real, distinct 
female colleges be enlarged and multiplied on 
every hand. 



It is with deep regret that we chronicle 
the resignation of Professor Rockwood. He 
has been connected with the College for about 
five years, and during that period has been 
one of our most able and respected instructors. 
The chau' which he has occupied — that of 
Mathematics — is always a difficult one to be 
filled, and it must be pleasant to Professor 
Rockwood to know he has filled it at Bowdoin 
with universal acceptance to the students. 
We can testif}^ from personal knowledge of 
the thoroughness and efficiency of his teaching, 
and while we are compelled to saj' good-bj^e 
to our teacher, we add many heartfelt wishes 
for his future prosperity. 

Rutgers is to be congratulated on securing 
the services of such a man. 



It is perhaps a little unfair to speak of the 
young gentlemen's peculiarities, now they are 
no longer with us to answer for themselves, 
but we cannot help remarking — as we did the 
other day — that the nurses of some of those 
young Freshmen did not teach them the 
proper way of sitting, up straight at church 
and looking right at the minister. Perhaps, 
also, by way of observation we may extend 
the same remark to portions of the other 
classes, without giving serious offense. In its 
proper place nothing is better than a good il- 
lustration, but for our present purpose the 
only one we can think of is the following : 
If a very large man should take a very large 
bag, and put into it, some fine Sunday morn- 
ing, all the students who frequent churches, 
and then if the same very large man should 



140 



BOWBOIN ORIENT. 



give the same very large bag with the church- 
goers in it a tremendous shaking, and all of a 
sudden pour out the contents, half into the 
North gallery and half into the South gallery 
of the " church on the hill," the several indi- 
viduals would alight in about the positions 
they customarily assume at sermon-time. 

Imagine such a scene and further com- 
ments will be unnecessarj^ ; only remember, 
if our pictui-e seem not true, that we have had 
but one field of observation ; it may be worse 
in the other churches. 



To use a pun which none of you ever 
heard before, The Bugle has blown its annual 
blast in a very creditable manner. The lead- 
ing editoral — it must be leading, for there is 
no other — gives a very good picture of the 
internal condition of the College. 

The first sentence, however, " What a 
wonderful law is this of change, so subtle in 
its workings, so rapid in its progress, so start- 
ling in its effects," seems to have no jurisdic- 
tion over part of the thirt3'-fifth page — that 
part containing the list of " Periodicals regu- 
larly received " at the Bowdoin Reading Room. 
That list was probably stereotyped from a for- 
mer edition of The Bugle., and not made subject 
any more to the common laws of mutability. 
It stands as it did in times of old — so old 
that one, at least, of the periodicals there men- 
tioned has not been published for some years, 
or perhaps months will do. 

Then again as to the forty-ninth page. 
Somebody had been reading Scott and Shaks- 
peare all in the same evening, when he made 
the immortal Will say : — 

" Come one, come all ! this rock shall fly 
From its firm base as soon as I." 

We had hoped to see some other Uterary 
contributions from the Junior editors — not 
necessarily " editorials." 

The typographical appearance of The Bu- 
gle is all that could be desired, and speaks 



louder than commendation in words can do 
for the Leiviston Journal press. 



At the recent meeting of the Boards of 
Trustees and Overseers, very little business 
was transacted, so far as we have been able 
to discover. The time of the venerable gen- 
tlemen was chiefly occupied in discussing the 
situation, without coming to any definite ac- 
tion. They have adjourned till January, when 
no doubt something will be done to relieve 
the present embarrassments of Bowdoin. 

Just what that something will be, of course 
nobody knows. One rumor has it that appli- 
cation for assistance will be made to the next 
Legislature ; but we fear the outlook in that 
direction is quite as bad as the present sight. 
If Bowdoin, professing to be an orthodox in- 
stitution, expects aid from the State, every 
other denominational institution will open its 
mouth and raise the cry for help. But then 
that is to be expected. 

At any rate, something must be done for 
us, whether by State or individuals is of little 
consequence so long as it is done ; otherwise 
our Alma Mater must go that broad and easy 
way prepared for those who have no money 
and no friends. As to friends we feel tolera- 
bly well supplied, but as to money — there we 
feel poor. Our finances are said to be in a 
bad condition, and all the world knows what 
that means. 

It is humiliating to our dignity — we may 
as well confess it — to see the other colleges 
of the State, so much smaller and j'ounger 
than we, getting the best of it in the financial 
question. Why there is Bates, a six- or seven- 
year-old, holding in each one of its plump 
little hands, a gift of a hundred thousand 
dollars ; and there is Colby — not much 
superior to us for aught we have heard — 
pillowing her head on a million-dollar will! 
And here is Bowdoin, the old and venerable 
one of all, thankful for " three grains of corn " 



BOWBOIN ORIENT. 



141 



gathered from the harvests of her Alumni 
with no prospect of more. 

Nor is this all. It is a well-known fact that 
Bowcloin has some good professors, just as she 
used to have in the days of her former glory, 
and while this fact is known abroad, other 
institutions must go on picking them away 
from her one by one. 

Something must be done to stop it, and 
certainly something will be done. We never 
want to see the reputation of Bowdoin,once 
so large and respectable, wandering about the 
land desolate at last, — Uke a featherless, 
starving fowl, shrieking, " no money, no 
friends.'' Let the Alumni continue to throw 
in their " three grains of corn " and speedily 
hope for better days. 



IIDITORS" TABLK 



Pronouncing Handbook of Words often Mispro- 
nounced, and of Words as to which a Choice of 
Pronunciation is Allowed. By Richard Soule and 
Loorais J. Campbell. Boston : Lee & Shepard, 
1873. 

The examination we have given this little 
work has returned us a fair amount of preju- 
dice in its favor. 

It contains a list of 3000 words (come to 
think of it, we omitted to count them), which 
we Americans — some of us at least — are verj' 
fond of mispronouncing. 

The t3'pe is large, clear and commendable, 
while the size of the book is no argument 
against making it a vade-mecum. 



In this department of the paper we have 
only a word further to add this time, and that 
word is 

TO OUK EXCHANGES. 

Perhaps you should have an apology from 
us for not giving you more attention in this 
number. Well, no disrespect is intended. 
Circumstances are armed to the teeth against 
us, and resistance would be not only useless. 



but destructive to all hopes we may have of a 
future reputation. 

We certainly want to deal fairly by 3"0u, 
as you by us, but to express opinions without 
examining your merits or demerits, would be 
but a hazardous undertaking. 

But here you are all around us, waiting to 
be read and criticised. We shall certainly 
improve the opportunity — but not now. The 
vacation has come upon us, our printer is 
anxious for copy, the weather of this cold 
country in which we live is growing unusually 
severe, our friends are gone home, and what- 
ever voice of criticism we put forth now, 
might gather considerable coldness from these 
eastern new-made snow-banks. 

We have kindlier feelings toward you, and 
no desire to have them otherwise. We have 
spent many pleasant hours in your company, 
till your faces and expression have become 
familiar. Till the vacation is over, however, 
we must be spoken to without speaking; but 
at the beginning of another term we hope 
again to add our bit to the conversation. 



LOCAL^ 
Term closed a week ago to-day. 

The Bible has been returned to the chapel 
desk. 

Vacation — solitude and snow banks divide 
the sovereignty of the campus. 

The Telegraph says that Prof. James B. 
Taylor, late of Bowdoin College, has accepted 
the position of Instructor in Elocution and 
Latin in Chauncy Hall School, Boston. 



Three professors of the University of South 
Carolina have resigned because of the admis- 
sion of a colored student. — Advocate. 

Let us have their names, that we may 
warn them away from Bowdoin. 



142 



BO WD OIN OBIENT. 



EXCHANGES. 

Old and New, LippincoU's Magasine, Har- 
vard Advocate, Anvil, Collegian, College Argus, 
Chronicle, Amherst Student, Madisonensis, 
Dartmouth, Nassau Lit., Cornell Era, Lafayette 
Monthly, Mercury, Trinity Tablet, Brunonian, 
Yale Courant, Southern Collegian, Morning 
Star, Literary World, Southhridge Journal, 
Beloit College Monthly, Journal of Education, 
Vidette, Volante, Griswold Collegian, E. I. School- 
master, College Herald, Journal, Ellsivorlh 
American, Hamilton Lit., Illinois Schoolmaster, 
University Herald, Magenta, Yale Record, Port- 
land Daily Advertiser, Bath Times, Vassar Mis- 
cellany, N. Y. Observer, University Record, Vox 
Humana, Wittenberger, St. Nicholas, Sanitarian, 
College Olio, Olivet Olio, University Reporter, 
Cornell Times. 



ALUMNI NOTES. 



[We earnestly request contributions for this 
department from tlie Alumni aud friends of the 
College.] 

'17. — Dr. James McKeen died at Topsham, 
Nov. 28, aged 76 years. The long life thus 
brought to a close, has been one of great ac- 
tivity and usefulness. From the year 1825 
to the year 1839 Dr. McKeen was a professor 
in the Maine Medical College, and, as one of 
his pupils tells us, was a very popular 
teacher. He was son of Rev. Joseph Mc- 
Keen, the first President of Bowdoin, and his 
memory of the early history of the college 
was quite remarkable. During a. call we had 
the pleasure of making him last summer, he 
mentioned incidents he witnessed at the first 
Commencement, when he was but nine years 
old. A large circle of friends mourn his 
loss. 

'23. — Joseph Dowe died last May at South 
Natick, Mass. 

'27.— Rev. Richard Woodhull died at Ban- 
gor, Nov., 1873, aged 71 years. For twenty- 
five years of his life he preached at Thomas- 



ton, Me., and for some time was Treasurer of 
Bangor Theological Seminary. 

'27. — Hon. John P. Hale died at Dover, 
N. H., Nov. 19, aged 67 years. Mr. Hale has 
been very celebrated both as a public man 
and a fearless reformer. Besides having been 
Minister to Spain and U. S. Senator, he was 
once a candidate for the Presidency. During 
the old abolition times he took a decided stand 
for anti-slavery, to the prejudice of his own 
interest. The Morning Star snys, : — 

" For a time he stood almost alone in the Senate 
Chamber at Washington as the exponent of our an- 
ti-slavery purpose and policy. He looked about him 
to see hostile forces, and listened to hear bitter and 
threatening words. Most of his colleagues from 
New England counted him an extremist, and gave 
him suspiciou and remonstrance instead of sympa- 
thy and help. A majority of his fellow citizens in 
N. H., while proud of his talents aud silent with 
admiration in the presence of his pluck and his skill, 
gave him a qualified aud reluctant support, aud 
warned him against radicalism aud rashness. 

" But none of these things moved him. He held 
on his way. He conceded nothing. He was frank- 
ness itself. He never equivocated on the great 
question. He used no words with a double meaning. 
He was as impervious to blandishment as he was 
unawed by menace. He reaffirmed with new em- 
phasis, in private intercourse, what he had forcibly 
uttered in public debate. His words ever carrieil 
bis real thought, and his speeches crystallized in his 
votes. He could hardly have been enough of a 
seer to anticipate the overwhelming triumph of his 
views before his public life closed. But he had faith 
in the truth, and felt that he could wait whole cent- 
uries, if there was need of it, for the coronation of 
his principles. And so he filled the present with a 
brave and working zeal, and looked calmly iuto the 
future for his justification and reward." 

And further on : — 

" It is an honorable and an honored career which 
ends with his death. The nation may well mouru 
over the loss of a faithful son. The souls are many 
and tender which feel themselves bereaved by the 
blow that stills the heart whose beating was always 
so friendly. But we yield the fallen man without 
complaint to the call of Him whose servant he was, 
and lift up our thanksgiving for the blessing which 
came to us in the lending of such a life to the world. 
Friend, patriot, statesnlan, hail and farewell ! " 

'58. — Robert Ellis has been re-elected Clerk 
of Courts for Oconto County, Oconto, Wis- 
consin. 

'72. — Freeman A. Ricker was married at 
Bath, Nov. 20, to Miss Virginia Houghton. 



BOWBOIN ORIENT. 



143 



GLEANINaS. 

Cornell numbers among its students twen- 
ty-five Brazilians. 

The autobiography of John Stuart MiU is 
published by Henry Hoyt & Co. 

Prof. George N. Boardman takes Dr. 
Kitchel's place as President of Middlebury. 

The College Argus doesn't like the name 
"Wesleyan Universitjs" but prefers "Middle- 
town College." 

The Amherst Seniors have got into trouble 
and hard feeling, and voted to have no class- 
day. We appreciate the situation. 

The Harvard Advocate says a new society, 
TJpsilon Chi., is to be founded, composed of 
students who expect to enter the Christian 
ministry. 

Prof, to Fi-esh. — " Do you understand ? " 
Fresh. — "No, sir." Prof. — "What don't you 
rmderstand?" Fresh. — "I don't know, sir." 
Prof. — " That is a most deplorable state of 
mind to be in." — Ex. 

Prof. Proctor, in his lecture in Boston, in- 
timates that the crater-like appearances on 
the moon may be depressions caused by the 
fall of meteors when the moon Avas in a plas- 
tic state. 

Prof. Goldwin Smith of Cornell agrees 
with Pres. Eliot, that the effort to open our 
male colleges to young women has failed, and 
that public sentiment is as strong as ever 
against it. 

The following verses have been put to 
music — C. M. — and are sung at Junior Class 
meetings : — 

Mary had a little lamb, 
With which she useil to tussle; 

She siiatclied the wool all off its back, 
Aud stufi'ed it iu her bustle. 

The lamb soon saw he had been fleeced, 

And in a passion flew, 
But Mary got upon her ear. 

And stutted the lamb in, too. 

— Tar gum. 



A Yale professor has been elected to one 
branch of the New Haven Common Council 
and the colored college carpenter to the other. 
—N. Y. Eve. Post. 

The annual "rush "at Rochester Univer- 
sity resulted in quite a serious accident. A 
member of the Sophomore Class was thrown 
down, trampled upon by the excited combat- 
ants, and so injured that it was at first thought 
he would not live. He is now, however, slow- 
ly recovering. Resolutions have been passed 
by the students promising the abolition of this 
brutal custom. 

Heliotype Publication 

— OF THE — 

GRAY COLLECTION 

—OF — 

ENGRAVINGS 

Harvard College, 

JAMES R. OSGOOD & CO., Publishers, 

BOSTON. 

Messrs. James R. Osgood & Co. have the pleasure of announcing that 
by the desire of the President and Fellows of Harvard College, they are 
now publishmg Heliotype reproductions of the principal art treasui'es of 
the "Gray Collection of Engravings," owned by Harvard College. This 
Collection is one of the most complete and perfect in the country. It con- 
tains the choicest and most costly proofs of muny of the best engravers of 
the world, and is especially rich in the criginal works of Albert Durer, 
Rembrandt, Marc-Antonio, Lukas Van Leyden, Caracci, and others. It 
comprises the host engravings of Raphael Morgheu, Lmghi, Toschi, Ander 
loni, MuUer, "Willie, Desnoyers, Mandel, Strange, Sharpe, "W'ooUet, and 
other leading engravers, from the pictures of Raphael, Titian, Correggio, 
Guido, Leonardo da Vinci, AInrillo and other celebrated artists. The por- 
traits by Velazquez, Van Dyck and others, and the engraved heads of dis- 
tinguished persons by Nantcuil, Edelinck, Masson and Houbraken are a 
most important feature of the collection. 

The publishers are enabled by means of the rapidity, faithfulness and 
artistic quality of the Heliotype Process, to offer beautiful reproductions 
frjm the choicest and most costly works of art at the lowest possible prices. 
Rare etchings or artist-proof engravings worth hundreds of dollars each, 
may be reproduced and sold at prices varying from fifty cents to two or 
three dollars, thus bringing the treasures of art-galleries within the reach 
of all, aud affording a means of art-education hitherto unattainable. 
About 70 subjects are now ready. 

Special prices made with Colleges and Institutions of Learning. Nearly 
10,000 prints have been sold to the students of Harvard. 

"W. T. GOODAI.E, Pnliliskers' Agent, 

For Bowdoin College. 



144 



BOWBOIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 



Classical Department. 

TERMS OF ADMISSION. 

Candidates for admission into the Freshman Class are examined as fol- 
lows : — 

Harkness's Latin Grammar, including Prosody; Parts I. and 11. Hark- 
ness's Introduction to Latin Prose Composition; Virgil, the Bucolics, 
Georgic3, and six books of the iEneid; Cicero's Select Orations; Sallust. 

Hadley's or Goodwin's Greek Grammar; Goodwin's Greek Reader; or 
Xcnophon's Anabasis, 4 books, and Homer's Iliad, 2 books. 

Arithmetic; Algebra, to equations of the second degree; Davies's 
Legendre's Geometry, first and third books. 

English Grammar; Ancient and Modern Geography. 



Scientific Department. 



TERMS OF ADMISSION. 

Applicants for admission will be examined in the following subjects : — 
Mathematics — Arithmetic, includmg Common and Decimal Frac- 
tions, Interest, and Square Root; Algebra, to Equations of the 
Sicond Degree; Geometry, Books I. and III. of Davies's Le- 
ge udre. 
Geography — Political Geography, and simple elements of Astrono- 
mical and Physical Geography. 
History — Leading facts in general History, and especially in Ameri- 
can History. 
Latin — Allen's Latin Grammar, or the equivalent. 
English — The examination will consist in Ist, Reading aloud a pas 
sage from some standiird author, with explanations of gram' 
matical construction, and definition and derivation of words; 2d' 
Writing a few sentences in English, on some familiar subject 
reference being had to spelling and punctuation as well as to 
composition; 3d Correction^ of ungranmiatical sentences com- 
posed for the purpose. 
All candidates for admission must produce certificates of their good 
moral character. 

The time for admission is the Friday after Commencement, and the 
first Thursday of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants may be 
xamined at other times. 

Courses of Study. 

The regular course of Instruction is that commended by the leading 
colleges of the country as eminently adapted to secure liberal culture. 

THE SCIENTIFIC COURSE 

has been recently organized. Thirty-four students have already entered, — 
a fact which indicates that the College has been successful in its effort to 
meet the demand for a liberal course of study which shall at the same 
time look towards the actual uses and applications of knowledge. 
The studies pursued in this course are comprised in the following:— 
Languages — English one year, and optional two ; Latin one year, 
optional three ; French one year, optional three ; German one 
year, optional two ; Spanish, Italian, Swedish, Anglo-Saxon, one 
year. 
Mathematics — Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, Mensuration, 
Spherical Trigonometry, Analytical Geometry ; Difierential and 
Integral Calculus, with the application of these to Surveying, 
Navigation, Projections, Dialling, Levelling, Astronomy, Mechan- 
ics, Topographical and Hydrographical Engineering. 
Natural History — Geology, Mineralogy, Botany, Zoology, with their 
relations to the Industrial Arts. 



Natural Philosophy — Mechanics, Hydrodynamics, Pneumatics 
Optics, Astronomy, Light, Heat, Electricity, &c. 

Chemistry — In all its branches and applications. 

History and Political Science — General, Medieval and Modem His- 
tory, Political Economy, General I^inciples of Law, Interna, 
tional Law, Law of Evidence, Constitution of United States, 
Theory of Government, American Law. 

Philosophy — Rhetoric, Logic, Psychology, Metaphysics, Evidences 
of Natural and Revealed Religion, Ethics, Esthetics. 

The studies of the first two years are common throughout the Depart- 
ment and are intended to lay a broad and substantial foundation for al- 
branches of subsequent study. In the last two years the studies are 
arranged in distinct courses, in accordance with certain leading objects : a 
general scientific culture, or special technical skill. Attention is particu- 
larly invited to the facilities ofiered for the thorough study of Civil Engi 
neering. 



A POST-GRADUATE COURSE 



which Instruction will be given 



of two years is also commenced, i 
he following schools: — 

I. Letters — Comprising Languages, Ancient and Modem (includ- 
ing the Oriental) with their literatures ; Philology ; Rhetoric; 
Logic ; History ; Elocution ; the Fine Arts. This leads to the 
degree of Master of Arts. 

II. Science — Advanced Mathematics, Physics, Natural History and 
Chemistry, in their uses and applications. This leads to the 
degree of Doctor of Science. 

m. Philosophy — Comprising the above, considered in their reasons 
and relations ; Psychology, Metaphysics, Ethics, Esthetics ; Poli- 
tics ; Theory of Government, Constitutional History, Principles 
of Law, International Law. Leading to the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy. 

rv. Medicine — The Medical School of Maine. Degree, — M. D. 

Students who are not graduates will be received on satisfactory evi- 
dence of proficiency in study which will enable them to profit by this 
Course. 

Much and careful attention is given to Physical Culture under the train 
ng of accomplished Instructors. The Gymnasium is well provided with 
approved apparatus, and the opportunities for Military drill and discipline 
are of the very best. 

It is but just to say that good morals and manliness are distinguishing 
features of college life at Bowdoin. 

The Library of Bowdoin is one of rare value, and the choicest works 
are constantly added. The Gallery of Paintings is well known to be one oi 
the most remarkable in the country. The Cabinet and apparatus are 
ample for their purpose. 

The annual expenses are, for tuition, &c., $90. Board $2.50 and $4.00 
a week. Pecuniary assistance, from the income of thirty scholarships and 
various other benefactions, is rendered to those who are unable fully to 
meet their expenses otherwise. 

Commencement July 10th. Examination for admission July 12th and 
Aug. 28th, at 9 a.m. 

First term begins Aug. 28th, at evening. 

Every encouragement will be given to persons who desire to pursue 
any study taught in the College. 

The town of Brunswick, situated on tide water — the Androscoggin River 
on one side and the Ocean on the other ; already a seat of various manu- 
factures and destined to become one of the principal railroad centres of the 
State, easy also of access from all quarters, — presents an excellent locality 
for scientific as well as literary pursuits, while the facilities afforded by 
Bowdoin College, its Libraries, Galleries of Art, Cabinets, Scientific Col- 
lections, Laboratories, and Apparatus, offer great inducements to the ear- 
nest student of the Useful and Liberal Arts 



Vol. III. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, JANUARY 28, 1874. 



No. 13. 



THE ^EVf. 

Three stars Orion Tvcareth in his sword ; 
Put three in this : faith, hope, and love. 
Tell him who takes it, it is of the Lord, 
And made to smite, with courage from above. 
The hearts of many men. Nor thought nor word. 
But great and holy deed will give it might. 
New Year, gird on thy flashing gem and smite. 

... Z. 
S*^' 

MISTAKEN. 

BY CLARA F. GUERNSET. 

Te say that love is strong as death : 

To know not what ye speak. 
Shall love be as the feeble breath, 

The color on the cheek ? 

Stronger than death or woe or time 

Is lie who rules al)ove ; 
And through the storms of ages chime 

His own words, " God is love." 

Death is the subject slave of love ; 

For love is God on high : 
Stronger than death, lovo rules above. 

Till death himself shall die. 

- — Old and New for February. 



THE MILITARY DEPARTMENT IN 
' BOWDOIN. 

[The following is tbe argument of the students in 
support of their petition for the abolition of the 
drill, prepared at the request of the Boards, but 
not asked for by them, because, forsooth, the 
petition was not considered. — Eds. Oeiext.] 

To the Boards of Trustees and Overseers. 

In behalf of the petitioners, we beg leave 
to present to yon- the following argnment in 
favor of the abolition of the Militarj^ Depart- 
ment, prepared at the request of your com- 
mittee. This argument is not intended merely 
as a substantiation of the summary of reasons 
set forth in the petition, for we do not mean 



to be at all confined to that. This is the first 
fuU and authenticated ^vritten argument in 
support of our petition ; those articles which 
have heretofore appeared in print have either 
been pei-sonal attacks upon opponents or de- 
fenses of our i-ight of petition or the conduct 
of the petitioners, or have taken up only a 
few of the many points of the case, and have 
in no instance been authorized, and in many 
not endorsed by the majority of students ; the 
student who appeared before your committee 
at your last meeting came more in the chai'ac- 
ter of an expositor of our position and a witness 
in our favor than an advocate ; the summary 
of reasons set forth in the petition was not 
intended in the least as an argument in its 
favor ; first, because from its very nature it 
must be brief ; second, because a paper which 
so many were expected to sign could include 
only those things upon wliicli all could agree ; 
and, third, it was deemed very inappropriate 
to combine with a petition any formal argu- 
ment in its favor. For these reasons we ask 
that opinions and prejudices which we know 
have been formed in opposition to our petition 
be now altogether laid aside, and our argu- 
ment be considered without reference to 
them. 

Lest the feeling of the students towards 
the petition, and the manner in which it orig- 
inated and its signatures were obtained, should 
be misunderstood, we will give a brief sketch 
of the movement. 

At the beginning of the present year the 
Military Department became much more se- 
vere and burdensome in its requirements than 
ever before. The dissatisfaction and discon- 
tent which had been felt among the students 
during the previous term grew proportionately. 



146 



BO WD OIN OBIENT. 



It did not culminate, however, in any organ- 
ized movement on their part until the publi- 
cation of the order requiring the purchase of 
uniforms. The indignation was universal, and 
many plans were proposed, some even of open 
revolt. The more conservative plan, however, 
■was deemed wisest, and it was resolved to pe- 
tition the Boai'ds for the entire abolition of the 
Military Department. This was not done in 
haste, nor was the movement confined to a few. 
The matter Avas thoroughly discussed for some 
time and the j)lan well known even before the 
petition was written. Two were written, par- 
tially circulated, and then given up. It was 
not until the third that one was found satisfac- 
tory to all those who wished to sign. lu 
obtaining signatm-es no persuasion was used 
except in a very few cases, and in those but very 
little ; none was necessary. The petition was 
not the work of a few, by them forced upon 
an unwillmg majority; it was written and 
circulated in response to the almost universal 
demand of the students. 

No spirit of insubordination actuated us 
in this step, nor any desire to dictate to those 
in whose hands the authority rested, but we 
believed that the ahnost unanimous request of 
the students would be carefully considered, 
and, if backed by sound reason, cheerfully 
granted. In discussing the merits of the Mil- 
itary Department theoretically, it must be 
remembered that the burden of proof lies with 
those Avho favor its establishment, as it always 
does with those who advocate an innovation. 
For although the Military Department has 
been in operation for more than a year, it is 
still an experiment, and as such the presump- 
tion is against it and in favor of the old and 
(long -established course of things in this and 
other colleges. If then it can be jDroved that 
the advantages expected fi'om the Military 
Department are not and will not be actually 
derived, it is enough to justify its discontinu- 
ance. The advantages which it is said it is 
the aim of the Military Department to afford 



are three in number ; 1st, Physical training ; 
2d, Acquaintance with military tactics and 
discipline ; 3d, That dignity of bearing and 
spirit of obedience and self-possession so 
necessary to the constitution of the thorough 
man. 

Does the drill afford good phj'sical exer- 
cise? Certainly this is not the purpose for 
which it is intended ; its routine of duty was 
not prepared to effect an}^ such end. It was 
calculated to fit men to win battles by effect- 
ive use of powder and shot, by rapid and reg- 
ular manffiuvres and "vigorous and sternly 
maintained discipline ; the building up of 
healthy phj'siques, the development of muscle 
and general lij'gienic advantage formed no 
part of the plan. 

Now one of the first essentials of a system 
of ph3'sical training is that it should be capa- 
ble of adaptation to men of different physical 
power and different temperament, to varying 
cu'cumstances and reasons. But this the very 
nature of militarj^ training precludes, for to 
attain what we have said is its main and appro- 
priate aim, there must be uniformity through- 
out. The weak and the strong must go through 
the same exercise and bear the same burdens. 
The variations of time and circumstances 
must be forgotten. There never has been, nor 
indeed could there be, any modification of the 
uniform routine to suit peculiar cases, if the 
system was to deserve the name of military 
discipline. Now there are, and must ever 
be, peculiar subjects — subjects of every kirid 
and character — in a college M'hose classes are 
made up of such varied elements. Men come 
here from the fitting school, from close appli- 
cation to study and almost entire absence of 
physical training — pale student striplings to 
whom the slightest exercise is a burden. Men 
come here, too, from the farm and the back- 
woods, stout country lads of vigorous muscle 
and strong ph3'siques, whose lives have been 
gymnastic training of the severest kind. They 
meet on the parade ground, and to both the 



BOWDOm ORIENT. 



147 



same routine is appointed, though what is 
light and trivial to one is lieavy and burden- 
some to the other. 

The drill, too, is a very irregular exercise, 
requiring violent effort at one time and an 
almost entire cessation of motion at another. 
Double quicks and dead halts are carelessty 
combined, regardless of health or comfort. 
Some muscles, too, are heavily taxed, while 
others are almost entirely neglected. Nor are 
the Jiiuscles which most need the exercise — 
those of the arms and chest — the ones which 
receive it in the greatest measure. The lower 
limbs, which we are obliged to use almost 
constantly outside, receive the greatest part 
of attention here ; Avliile the light manual 
exercise with the guns is utterly inadequate 
to the needs of the upper limbs and chest, in 
most all students weak and requiring special 
development. If, however, there is any really 
l)eneficial exercise in the drill, it is nothing 
more than a repetition of what we are obtain- 
ing in all the involuntary exercise of every- 
day life. 

But even supposing the drill gave all that 
is claimed for it in physical exercise, how un- 
necessary it is for that purpose only to intro- 
duce it into Bowdoin, alread}^ possessing such 
abundant facility for the best gymnastic train- 
ing. The Bowdoiu Gymnasium, the efficiency 
of its instructor, and the excellence of its 
•arrangements, are too well known to - need 
extended comment. Let it be remembered, 
too, that the Gymnasium has labored luider 
disadvantages Avhich the Military Department 
has never experienced ; that while to the 
support of the latter the arsenals of the Gov- 
ernment and the pockets of the students have 
bounteousty contributed, the poverty of the 
College has made it unable to give the aid 
which the former has required. But the 
Gymnasium is not all. Boating has Avithin a 
few years excited a new interest among ns, 
and facilities in this direction are rapidly in- 
creasing. It is a sport which is admirably 



adapted to develop muscle and promote health, 
and at the same time is very popular. It is 
the same with base-ball and foot-ball and our 
other sports. All these exercises possess in 
the highest degree those advantages which, 
as we have said, the drill lacks. They have 
popularit}^, too, and it is in its lack of this 
that the drill most completely fails as a physi- 
cal exercise. That the drill is beneficial as 
affording a knowledge of military tactics, we 
do not altogether deny. To prove it, how- 
ever, three things must be shown : first, that 
the exercise we have does afford this knowl- 
edge ; second, that this knowledge will be 
retained; third, that this knowledge, if re- 
tained, will be useful in after years. Any 
one of these propositions falling to the ground, 
the main one falls with it. A far better proof 
than could be obtained from any theorizing, 
of the inadequacy of the drill to afford any 
tolerable knowledge of militarj' tactics, might 
be obtained by an examination of the students, 
even those best disposed towards it, and who 
have been here longest; or yet better, per- 
haps, by a practical test on the battlefield or 
the march. The truth is, it is impossible, 
unless an encroachment be made to an almost 
unlimited extent on literary studies, to give 
sufficient time and importance to military dis- 
cipline to make it really profitable. A mili- 
tar}' education is a professional one, and it is 
against ever)"- theory of the best educators 
and every lesson of experience, to crowd upon 
the work of general education the attainment 
of a special profession. It is foUj'' to say it is 
only expected that a partial acquaintance with 
military science will be acquired. Why not 
then introduce into the course a little of law 
or medicine or theology? Either, it cannot 
be doubted, would be far more acceptable and 
far more profitable to the student. That, 
however, Avhich most seriously hinders the 
usefulness of the drill in this du-eetion is its 
intense unpopularity. Students will not at- 
tempt to learn what is forced upon them so 



148 



BOWBOIN ORIENT. 



much to their disrelish. The motto of ahnost 
every one is, " Give just as little attention to 
the drill as will he sufficient to avoid the ex- 
treme penalty of insubordination," and in 
some cases even this limit has been passed. 
Every possible effort is made to avoid the 
daily exercise ; everj^ possible excuse is offered 
for non-attendance. It is plain that any ad- 
equate instruction cannot be forced upon those 
so hostile to it. 

If any considerable acquaintance with mil- 
itary tactics is acquired, will it be retained ? 
Will it not rather soon be forgotten, when, at 
the completion of the college course it is at 
once dropped as a detested thing, and the 
graduate engrossed with the cares of business 
and profession ? 

If this knowledge is acquired and retained, 
is it likely to prove useful hereafter? For 
this two things are necessary, viz., there must 
be war or military operations, and those pos- 
sessing this knowledge must take part in it. 

The possibility of war it is not necessary 
to discuss, save to say that it is only a possi- 
lility, in view of the present state of Christen- 
dom, the situation of our own country, and 
the growing popularity of arbitration in the 
settlement of international dis^Jutes. 

But the young men educated in our col- 
leges are not those most hkely to become par- 
ticipants in a war. For the most part they 
enter upon some studious or intellectual jjur- 
suit, become lawj^ers, ministers, phj^sicians, 
and teachers, who are the last to leave for the 
battlefield, and are not the ones, then, to 
whom this military education would be of 
most value. In fact, if required and retained, 
there is only a possibility of its ever becoming- 
useful, which in nine cases out of ten would 
never be realized. If the drill was intended 
as a school of manhood, there can be no doubt 
but that it has almost entirely failed. It may 
be that to the higher oificers it does give a 
certain dignity of bearing and familiarity with 
authority which is acquired in every position 



of prominence or power; but on the great 
mass of students the effect is exactly the 
reverse ; manhood is lost rather than gained. 
The "spirit of obedience" that it is said is 
imparted, is nothing but a spirit of slavish 
submission to what it is felt cannot be avoided ; 
while instead of a spirit of self-possession 
there is felt rather a consciousness of absolute 
possession by another power by whose will 
every movement is dictated. Undoubtedly it is 
the unpopularity of the drill which more than 
any other cause obstructs the accomplishment 
of this aim, and prompts many an unmanly 
act, and gives rise to many an unmanly 
thought. 

We said at the outset that the presiimp- 
tion was in our favor. If, then, we have 
proved, as we think we have, that very little, 
if any, actual benefit is derived from the Mil- 
itary Department, even though on our side we 
raised no other objection to it, the useless in- 
novation should not longer be maintained. 
But beyond all this there are many points in 
which the drill does absolute injury. The 
principal ones are three in number. 

I. Injury to the College, in three ways. 

1st, From loss of students. The fact that 
students have been prevented from entering 
Bowdoin merely on account of the existence 
of the Military Department here, can be 
proved by numerous instances. Tliese in- 
stances are well known, and their verity can 
be attested. It would be strange, indeed, 
considering its intense unpopularitj' in college, 
if it should have no corresponding effect upon 
those about to enter. The fact that the pres- 
ent Freshman Class is larger than any of its 
predecessors, does not disprove this in the 
least. The increase in the classes is chiefly 
owing to two things — ^the establishment of 
the scientific course; and the prestige of Pres- 
ident Chamberlain. We know not how much 
larger they might have been had it not been 
for the existence of the Military Department 
here. Certain it is, that the class which en- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



149 



tered the 3'ear that President Chamberlain 
assumed Iiis duties and the scientific course 
was established, was much larger than the 
one which entered the following year after 
the Military Department was inaugurated. 
To offset the numerous instances we can bring 
forward, we challenge any one to cite a single 
case where a student has entered the college 
solely on account of the Military Department. 

2d, From loss of pi-estige in the eyes of the 
public. That the establishment of the Mili- 
tary Department here has been looked upon 
with disfavor throughout the State and among 
the Alumni, cannot be denied. The comments 
of the 2)ress have been almost without excep- 
tion adverse ; prominent men in the State, 
and many members of the Alumni have ex- 
pressed their disapprobation of the scheme. 
This disfavor on the part of those who might 
become its benefactors cannot fail to be an 
injury to the College. 

3d, From the growth of a spirit of insub- 
ordination in college. This can only be un- 
derstood by those who are familiar with the 
internal history of college affairs during the 
last term. It is well known to tlie students 
and Faculty, at least, that the marks of a dis- 
contented and rebellious spirit among us were 
too many and too plain to be misunderstood ; 
that this has been growing ever since the or- 
ganization of the Military Department, and 
has been mostly in connection with it. 

II. Detraction from study. 

1st, From loss of time. To estimate tliis 
it is not enough to compute the amount of 
time spent in the usual daily exercises. This 
does not include nearly all, yet this has been 
much underrated. The cadets are required 
to drill from an hour to an hour and a -half 
five days a week during about twenty weeks 
of the thirty -six of the college year. Of 
course many stormy days intervene and pre- 
vent the drill altogether, yet often, in these 
cases, the uncertainty in regard to it causes 
almost as much annoyance and loss of time as 



the drill itself. It is wrong, however, to take the 
last term from which to judge of the number of 
these omissions, as has been done, for it con- 
tained an unusually large number of stormy 
days. But a large amount of time is spent 
outside the regular daily exercise, but in con- 
sequence of its existence. The care of equip- 
ments, dressing and undressing for drill, and 
frequent extra roll calls, consume an amount 
of time which cannot be calculated, but which 
has been much underrated. Sometimes an 
entire afternoon has been spent by the whole 
battalion in getting blouses, being measured 
for them, or for some similar purpose. But 
the time spent by the privates is much less 
than that spent by the higher officers. The 
latter, or at least the captains, first sergeants, 
and adjutant spend about twice as much time, 
on the parade ground and off, as their com- 
rades lower in rank. 

2d, By the estabUshment of a new scale of 
merit and rank. Tlie influence of this upon 
a large class of students is very great, espe- 
cially those who have not been successful in 
obtaining the honors of scholarsliip. Ambi- 
tion to attain rank in the Military Department 
has taken much time and thought which should 
have been bestowed on more important duties. 

III. Expense. 

The expense entailed upon the student 
varies according to his choice of uniform. 
The grey imiform costs about $30, the blue 
blouse, et cetera, ij5.60. But both of these are 
liable to be worn out, lost, or destroyed dur- 
ing the four years in which they are used, and 
the average expenditure thus $5.60 increased. 
Even the smaller sum is no small tax upon 
men who have to work hard for their educa- 
tion and make every dollar tell in their favor. 

It has been asserted that the uniforms are 
habitually worn by the students, who thus 
economize in the purchase of more expensive 
clothing. This is hardly true, for the grey 
coat and the blue blouse are almost utterly 
[Continued on p. 151. ] 



150 



BO WD ON ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVEET ALTERITATE WEDXESDAT DUK- 
nfG THE COLLEGIATE XEAE AT 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE, 
By THE Class op 1874. 

EDITORS. 

S. V. Cole, L. H. Kimball, 

"W. T. GooDALE, D. 0. S. Lowell, 

F. W. Hawthorne, F. K. Wheeler, 

H. K. White. 

Terms — $2 00 a year in advance; single copies, 
15 cents. 

Address commuuications to Bowdoin" Orient, 
Brunswick, Maine. 

For sale at 7 Appleton Hall, Bowdoin College. 
Also by J. Griffin and B. G. Deuuisou, Brunswick ; 
and A. Williams & Co., 135 Washington St., Boston. 



CONTENTS. 
Vol. III., No. 13. — Jan. 28, 1874. 

The New. (Poem.) 145 

Mistaken. (Poem.) 145 

The Military Department in Bowdoin 145 

Editorial Notes 150 

Local 152 

Editors' Table 153 

Alumni Notes 155 

Gleanings 156 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



Miss Kate Stanton drew a pretty full 
house, the other evening, to hear her lecture 
on the " Lives of Great Men." 

The lecture, though evidently written with 
much care and deliberation, failed to attract a 
hearty verdict in its favor. Something seemed 
lacking in its make-up, and we are inclined to 
think it was the good judgment of its author. 
Either Miss Stanton holds views not commonly 



accepted in regard to social hfe, or her inter- 
pretation of certain characters in history was 
marvellous in the extreme. 



The meeting of the Boards seem to have 
been quite a success in a pecuniary point of 
view. Some $60,000 were pledged by the 
members, to go towards the endowment of 
the College. 

Among the other business transacted, ex- 
President Hopkins of Williams College, was 
elected to fill provisionally the chair of Men- 
tal and Moral Philosoply, and Mr. Charles 
H. Smith, late tutor in Yale College, was 
elected Professor of Mathematics, in place of 
Prof. Rockwood, resigned. 

The Department of Engineering also re- 
ceived much encouragement, and a determin- 
ation was expressed to secure 150,000 for its 
endowment. 

Provision was also made for a new recita- 
tion room in tlie south wing of the Chapel. 
These things certainty look encouraging. 



The editor of the Tdegraph is not our 
father or our grandfather. Yet, on reading 
his article in rej)ly to ours, we did indeed feel 
very much like a wayAvard, disobedient, little 
son, who, sternly summoned to the paternal 
knee, finds mingled with the rough " boot- 
ings " of the paternal toe, the tender caresses 
and head-pattings of the father's gentle hand, 
and hears at one moment the harsh tones of 
reproof, and, at the next, the soft loving 
accents, " Go and sin no more. The editor 
evidently remembers that we are but boys. 
However severe the castigation we may merit, 
he never loses sight of the fact that our years 
are tender and full of indiscretion. We feel 
like going away somewhere in the dark and 
ciying, but we must keep a stiff upper lip, 
and boys as we are in one capacity, worthily 
maintain the dignity of our position as 
editors. 



JBOWn OIN ORIENT. 



151 



" The last Botvdo;:n" Orient says : ' We [the 
students] claim to be men, and our right to be 
treated as men.' And the same periodical contains 
accounts of the Bible being stolen from the chapel, 
the oiling of the black-boards in the mathematical 
recitation room, the ' ducking ' of several Freshmen 
with buckets of slops, and a midnight serenade with 
fish horns, from the tops of the dormitories, — which 
manly acts were all performed by these manly 
students." — Morning Star. 

As several local papers have copied the 
above for sober earnest, perhaps a little ex- 
planation will be necessary to the uninformed. 

In the first place we are quite surprised that 
editors of so large a paper as tlie Morninr/ Star 
should evii^e so little knowledge of the inner 
workings of a college. Every thing they 
mention may have happened and yet there 
inight be men among us none the less. With 
just as much reason as they have shown us, 
might we assume the outside world to be 
composed of criminals, because, forsooth, a 
few individuals are taken from it to fill the 
State Piison. The Mornirtfj Star, no doubt, 
claims to be the exponent of men: and yet 
the same periodical contains accounts of rob- 
beries, murders, and juauy other crimes far 
worse than stealing Bibles or giving fish-horn 
serenades. 

Remember it takes but six or seven 
students to give a very good college a ver}-- 
bad name ; the great majority may be of the 
most upright and examplary character. Out 
of two hundred students even one brisk, 
energetic Sophomore may be sufficient to en- 
danger the reputation of one hundred and 
ninety-nine — especially if we use the columns 
of the college paper to correct his misdeeds. 

Again, an evil report is said to travel faster 
and to grow to lai-ger dimensions as it travels, 
than a good report. If the black-board gets 
oiled, everybody in the community knows it 
immediately; but if we attend our college 
prayer meetings, week in and week out, nobody 
ever discovers it. 

But to come to the point, the undergradu- 
ates of Bowdoin may claim to stand as high 
in moral character as those of any college in 



the land — to say much higher than several 
we can mention, would be nearer the truth. 
Hazing here is no longer what it was years 
ago. No Freshman now need be deterred 
from "rooming in" for fear of "mask" 
and "pail." To be sure he gets "ducked" 
occasionally, in the daytime — not with slops, 
if you please — but the Faculty are ever on 
his side. Hazing, whenever detected, has 
been punished with the greatest severity. 

Let us not be reproached, then, for Avhat 
we are not guilty ; above all, let us not be 
reproached for striving, in the columns of our 
paper, to correct what evil does exist. 

P. S. Perhaps it may be well to say in 
this connection, that if the Morning Star will^ 
credit to the Bowdoin Orient, aU articles 
taken from its columns, as readily as it credits 
matter like the above, consistency would be 
quite as good a jewel. We refer to one of 
Prof. Carmichael's excellent contributions, 
that was credited simply to the " literary 
organ" of Bowdoin College. 



[Continued from p. 149.] 
worthless as articles of common apparel, 
though the pants and cap may be worn as 
such. Probablj', however, the student could 
with difficidty find more expensive clothing- 
than these. But when the assertion we refer 
to is made, it is forgotten that one of our 
printed regulations reads as follows : — 

"No Cadet shall, without permission from the 
Commandant of the Battalion, wear any article of 
his uniform except during the performance of mili- 
tary exercises, and upon occasions of public or pri- 
vate ceremony." 

thus making it altogether impossible for the 
student who means to obey the laws prescribed 
by our authorities to avail hiinself of tliis priv- 
ilege. 

There is another item which it is certainly 
proper to consider an expense to the student. 
He is obliged to take a gun and equipments 
at his OAvn risk, and to use them, too, con- 



152 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



stantly, and if they are lost or injured the 
loss or injury falls upon him. 

The last reason which we have for asking 
the abohtion of the Military Department is its 
intense and growing unj)opularity. The proofs 
of this are manifold and to be found on every 
hand. It seems indeed hardly necessary to cite 
proofs. It is well known to the Faculty and 
to all who have taken pains to ascertain, that 
the students utterly detest the drill. The 
petition itself, signed by 126 out of the 133 
men composing the three upper classes, is 
proof sufficient. We do not claim that be- 
cause anything is unpopular it is necessarily 
bad, or that it should on that account be abol- 
ished. We do claim, however, that however 
good and beneficial anything may be, its un- 
popularity is one reason why it should be 
abolished ; that, too, however good anything 
may be in itself, its unpopularity must very 
seriously obstruct its beneficial operation ; 
and, lastly, that the unpopularity of any insti- 
tution among those who have tried and tested 
it, is one very good reason for supposing it to 
be bad in itself. 

Of all these reasons, we beg your most 
careful consideration, and we court the most 
searching investigation of the entire subject. 



LOCAL. 

"Pretty Cupid." 

Freshmen haunt the gymnasium. 

An unusually large number of students 
have returned. 

Quotation from Horace : " His Fan-cy 
imagines a grind." 

The Medics, more recently known as the 
" Modocs," will soon be with us. Sajppy us! 

Gerry, '74, and Harriman, '75, started last 
Monday to attend the Boating Convention at 
Hartford, Conn. 



Four new men have entered the Freshman 
class this term ; the Sophomores have been 
increased by one. 

Rumors of all sorts, sizes, and descriptions, 
were circulated throughout college just before 
the assembling of " the boards." 

We hear rumors of the " mumps." We 
sincerely hope that no Freshman is afflicted 
with that species of " cheekiness." 

Scene in Laboratory. Classical Senior to 
Prof.—" What did the Goddess lo die of ? " 
Prof. — " I really could not — ." Senior tri- 
umphantly — "Iodide (died) of Potassium." ^^ j 

We understand that Whist and Euchre " 
are much in vogue in " Paradise." The 
games, however, are strictly legitimate, as 
any one who knows the inhabitants of that I 
locahty, can easily affirm. ."■ 

The twenty-seventh annual convention of 
the Zeta Psi Frateriaitj^ was held with the Tau 
Chapter of Lafayette College, at Easton, Pa., 
on Jan. 1st. F. W. Hawthorne, '74, repre- 
sented the Bowdoin chapter. 

Prof. Charles H. Smith, a graduate of 
Yale, class of '65, and formerly an Instructor 
in that college, has taken Prof. Rockwood's 
place as Professor of Mathematics, and is fill- 
ing the position very acceptably. 

The Seniors are enjoying a series of ex- 
ceedingly interesting lectures from Major 
Sanger on Military Science. These will con- 
tinue till the arrival of Prof. Mark Hopkins, 
who is expected about the first of February. 

A newly entered Freshman is said to have 
wandered round on the Campus for three or 
four days, " desolate and alone." He could 
not find the recitation room and would not 
enquire for it ; no, they would call him " ver- 
dant " if he did that. 

Vapor hears the midnight train now every 
night regularly, and mistakes it for the seven 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



153 



o'clock chapel bell ; he arises, dresses, starts 
for breakfast, but comes back to bed again 
every time, frightened hj the stillness without. 
It is rumored that he has a petition in circu- 
lation for the removal of the bell-ringer. 

A day or two after the departure of that 
gentleman known in literary circles as Noel- 
Hope, the following eulogy graced the walls 
of Adams Hall : 

" Old K"oel Tvas a fiery youth, 

But DOW his fire's abated; r \ 

Ho used to Tvear a nisty coat, ,\I 
But now he's msii-cated." ,1 ~ 

While Prof. was engaged with a tel- 
egraph messenger at the recitation room door 
the other day, two Sophs " went through " his 
overcoat. The spoils were light but very in- 
teresting : A cigar holder, recipe for removing 
grease spots, a bag of canary seed, and a 
postal card on which was written, " The un- 
dershirts and hose which you took from the 
line on Cleveland street, you will do well to 
return, as you are known." 

Twelve country Reps, from the State Leg- 
islature, hailed a Senior on the campus last 
Friday: Rep. (from Starks) — "I say. Bub, 
we want the key to the schooV Senior (see- 
ing " game ") — "I have no authority myself, 
and believe the key was lost a few da3's ago." 
Rep. (from Caribou) — "Well, this is pretty 
work! been delegated by the Governor — 
but, by Globe ! you wait till Warren Johnson 
comes and see if we don't go through it!"- 

Exercises in the gymnasium were resumed 
the first of the term, and are conducted as 
during last term. The interest manifested 
there seems even to be on the increase. The 
students take hold with spirit, and attend the 
exercises not so nuich from the fear of losing 
three marks, as from the pleasure and benefit 
derived from them. It seems a pity, under 
these circumstances, that the building is not 
better heated. The two or three Avood stoves 
do not even remove the chill from the room. 



When we consider the liability of students 
taking cold when in " gymnasium dress," and 
heated by exercise, it becomes almost a 
necessity to have the building heated to a 
temperature of 50 or 60 degrees at least. 

At last the reading room has been reno- 
vated, and really presents an inviting interior. 
The walls have been newly painted, the car- 
pet re-adjusted, the places for papers newly 
labeled, and settees and chairs introduced. 
Two of the students have been engaged to 
remain in the room while it is open, to see 
that good order is maintained and that the 
papers and magazines are not mutilated nor 
" borrowed." The room will be open from 
1.30 to 4.30 in the afternoon ; from 7 to 9 in 
the evening. 

EDITORS' TABLE. 



A Happy New Year to exchanges, small 
and great, old and j^oung, — if it be not too 
late to make good wishes. 

One wonders, for a moment, how the 
papers can accumulate so rapidly, until he 
reflects that for seven long weeks they have 
had nothing else to do. But the winter vaca- 
tion is past, and with much pleasure we get 
back into the old-fashioned chair. We make 
up our minds at once, on looking at the mon- 
strous pile, that if we examine a few lying 
nearest the top, our duty must be considered 
done. 

But the duty in many cases, is a pleasant 
one ; for here, first thing we see, is the Madi- 
sonenm — always welcome, always readable, 
always read. 

But, — shades of Diogenes! — just hear 
what the Bates Student for December has to 
say, and note the self-complacency of the little 
college it represents : — 

" We noticed the following, not long ago, in the 
BowDojN Orient, but our attention being taken 
up with things of more importance, it has passed 



154 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



unnoticed : ' Bates College recently conferred the 
degree of ll.d. on Hon Asa Kedington. Shortly 
afterwards the College received a donation of $10,- 
000 from the same gentleman. Where is Bowdoin 
with her ll.d.'s ? ' We wonld answer that Bowdoin, 
if we remember rightly, is iit Brunswick, Me., and 
her LL.D. is no other than the Hon. Jefferson Davis, 
chief cook and bottle-washer of the Southern Con- 
federacy. We recommend that they call on him for 
a few Confederate stamps." [The itaUcs are theirs.] 

Who does not remember his primary school 
days, and the marked abiUty which some of 
the minutest pupils displayed for a loud tone 
of voice ? " What is that letter ? " says the 
teacher. " A," shouts the young urchin with 
his most tremendous effert, and his sparkling 
eyes show how well he appreciates the teach- 
er's expected approval. The gentlemen of 
the Student doubtless had this fact in mind. 
They well understand that nothing more 
delights the heart of their questioner, than to 
have them speak up loud and distinctly when 
they are asked a question, so as to leave no 
doubt whatever that they have spoken. Their 
modesty is not so easily accounted for when 
they say — hear it, ye gods ! and blush — " If 
we remember rightly ! " What can they 
mean? The}^ show themselves remarkably 
familiar with Bowdoin's h.d.'s, and yet these 
more important things appear to be forgotten. 
Perhaps some of our readers may stop with 
us to smile just here. Gentlemen of the 
Student, you have simply fallen into error, 
and lest you do the same again, we call 
to your attention this one fact : the gulf that 
roUs between the prestige of Bowdoin and 
that of Bates, is still so broad that it cannot be 
easily bridged by your httle slips of memory. 
The Cornell Era is publishing a series of 
articles on living American poets. The first 
one is devoted to Longfellow, whom it con- 
siders not a poet of the highest order. " He 
has been too fond," the writer saj's, " of 
' Old legends of the monkish page. 
Traditions of the saint and sage, 
Tales that have the rime of age, 
And chronicles of eld,' 



to allow himself to look very deeply into his 
own soul, or to receive independent impres- 
sions from without, though it was an early 
theory of his to do so." 

And 

" He very early empted himself into his darling 
books, and his writings, both prose and rhyme, are, 
in the main, a string of fond literary recollections." 

The article is finely written and very 
readable. 

The Magenta has been gaining quite a 
reputation for poetry, of late, and in its meta- 
phors novv and then touches the hem of the 
Advocate's garments. Let thev following, 
taken from a recent number, bear witness : — 

" The orescent moon pours out her jar of light 
Upon the waters," 

and at the same time 

" Clouds as silvery white 
As angels' wings, float with the softest motion 
Across the sky, and pay their deep devotion 
Unto their queen enthroned on heaven's height." 

Only think of it! A queen sitting on a 
throne is emptying jars while her subjects 
are paying their devotions ! 

The poetry of the 3Iac/enta, however, is 
generally good. 

The Amherst Student is just entering its 
seventh j^ear. May its future be as hajDpy as 
its past has been honorable. 

In the Southern Collegian, Virginia chivalry 
finds a worthy advocate. That knightly 
paper, when dressed for combat, looks very 
much like that other invincible hero, Don 
Quixote, going about the country seeking for 
an adventure. The Collegian's wrath, how- 
ever, is poured out in a very mild, — let the 
Northern press bless its stars — though, at tlie 
same time, in a very disgusting manner. The 
column headed " Our Exchanges," shows 
Avhat Southern honor can do if offended, and 
also what Caliban shapes Southern taste and 
Southern rhetoric may, on emergencies, be 
made to assume. 

These remarks are prompted out of sym- 



\ 



BOWDOIN OEIENT. 



155 



patliy and are for the Collegiaii shenefit alone. 
Everybody else understands the situation. 

We glean from the Chronicle that Michigan 
University has fallen under ro3^al favor. The 
Grand Duke Alexis has presented that insti- 
tution with some thirty volumes on the history 
and educational interests of Russia. 

The following interesting item is from the 
Literary World : — 

"Mr. Wm. A. Wheeler, Assistant Superintendent 
of the Boston Puljlic Library, has prepared a his- 
tory of the Bowdoiu College class of 1853, of which 
he was a member. It is a handsome pamphlet of 
one hundred and sis pages, and is crowded with in- 
formation, the matter of which will deeply interest 
the members of the class, while its manner will 
heartily amuse the general reader. The history 
embraces leading events in the college course of the 
class, including personal allusions which will be 
appreciated in certain quarters, and a minute record 
of the post-college career of each member — what 
his occupation has been, whom he married, how 
many children he has, where he lives, etc., etc. The 
pamphlet also contains photographs of the class, 
taken at the time of graduation, and of most of the 
members, talceu recently. The artistic charm of 
the book is completed by a life-like picture of the 
late Thomas Augustus Curtis, otherwise known as 
Diogenes, for many years factotum of the Bowdoin 
students. Wo can imagine no possible improvement 
in Mr. Wheeler's work ; its abundance and minute- 
ness of information aie marvellous, and the graceful 
■wit of the editoral style is beyond praise. The quo- 
tations, with which the book is plentifully besprink- 
led, are very folicitious." 

We have also at hand, Old and New, Ad- 
vocate, Yale C'onrant, Olivet Olio, Wittenhcrger, 
Dickinsonian, Western Collegian, Targum, La- 
fayette Montldy. • 



A party of excursionists were "doing" the 
Library the other day, and one old gent asked 
Harris if the picture at the north end of the 
room Avas supposed to represent President 
White. "No" replied the librarian, "but there 
is a bust of the President." A moment later 
he heard the aged party remark to his wife : 
"My dear there is a hurst of Mr. White." — 
Cornell Times. 



ALUMNI NOTES. 



[We earnestly request contributions for this 
department from the Alumni and friends of the 
College.] 

'39. — Samuel E. Benjamin is practicing 
law at Patten, Me. 

'40. — The Press says that Mr. John A. 
Cleaveland, son of the late Professor Cleave- 
land of Bowdoin College, died at Newton, 
Mass., recently, at the age of fifty-four years. 
Mr. Cleaveland was a graduate of Bowdoin, 
of the class of 1840, and for the last ten years 
has been employed in the United States Treas- 
ury in Boston. 

'43. — Died in Montclair, New Jersey, Mr. 
John Craig Clark, aged fifty-five years. 

'68.— The Argus says that Mr. G. M. Bodge, 
Principal of Gorham Seminary, has accepted 
the position of Principal of Westbrook Semi- 
nary. The trustees of the Seminary have been 
very fortunate in securing the services of 
such a popular instructor. 

'72. — The Portland Advertiser says tliat 
J. G. Abbott of Gardiner (" Van Augustus "), 
correspondent of the Boston Herald, has just 
returned after a four days passage from Cuba, 
where he has been on a tour of observation 
and investigation for that paper. When lie 
sailed from New York, he was the only Amer- 
ican out of forty-three passengers. He has 
been there during the severest of the excite- 
ment, and was an eye-witness of the mobs 
just after the Virginius left Havana. He was 
once arrested while in that countr}'', but his 
papers being found correct, and no proofs 
existing against him, he was at once released. 



Bowdoin Alumni Dinner. The Portland 
Bowdoin Alumni held their annual dinner at 
the Falmouth Hotel, on Monday evening. 
The oration was delivered by Judge God- 
dard, and the poem was read by Rev. E. C. 
Cummings. Informal toasts were given and 
speeches were made by sundry gentlemen. 



156 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



among them by President Chamberlain and 
Prof. J. B. Sewall, both of whom gave flatter- 
ing reports of the condition of the College. 
J. C. Dodge, Esq., of Boston, the only Alum- 
nus present out of the State, made a very 
humorous speech upon the occasion. Officers 
were elected for the ensuing year, the Orator 
being T. B. Bead of '60, and the Poet, F. M. 
Ra}', '61. 

[Note. — We are under obligations to Mr. 
D. S. Alexander for his communication to this 
column. It was crowded out of the present 
number, but will appear in the next.] 



GLEANINaS. 

A Fresh says that the Prof, of Math- 
amatics is the dullest scholar he ever met, 
for he explained a problem in Geometry to 
him three times, and then the Prof, couldn't 
see it. — Madisonensis. 

A bundle of shingles fell from a wagon 
on the ferry-boat the other day, and struck 
fairly upon the head of a colored woman, who 
said, "Y'oughter b' shame to muss a cuUud 
wom'n's bar dat away. I wish de shingles 
fell ovaboard." — JEx. 

Prof, in Astronomy: "What part of the 
night is the coldest?" Student: (after con- 
siderable hesitation) "I don't know ; I am 
never up late." Prof, (sarcastically) "About 
sunrise. I suppose that you are never up so 
late." — Aniberst Student. 

The tragic Theologue who rend(er)s Shak- 
speare in the upper hall of Divinity, preached 
out of town a few Sunda3^s ago, and on his 
return complained of sore lips. Somebody 
was indiscreet enough to ask the cause, and 
"was satisfied with the answer that "so many 
people hung on them the day before." — Yale 
Courant. 

Stephen Girard's will prohibited clergy- 
men from ever entering the doors of Girard 
College. At a recent visit of the Knights 
Templar of Boston to this institution, one of 
the Knights, a well-known physician, Avho 
wears a white necktie, was passing in, when 



the janitor accosted him, saying, " You can't 
pass in here, sir ; the rule forbids it." " The 
h — 1 I can't," replied the physician. " All 
right, sir," rejoined the janitor, "pass right in." 

In commenting on the theory of a certain 
scientific enthusiast, that "atoms are inhabi- 
ted worlds,'' the Critic thinks the theory a 
pleasant one, and undoubtedly correct, but 
gets up one of his own, which he thinks 
equal, if not superior to it. He says : 

"Great fleas have little fleas upon their backs, to bite 'em ; 
And little fleas have lesser fleas, and so ad infinitum : 
And the gj'eat fleas themselves have greater fleas to go on" 
While these again have greater still, and greater still, and 
so on." 

— Williams Review. 



Heliotype Publication 



GRAY COLLECTION 



ENGRAVINGS 

Harvard College, 

— BT — 

JAMES R. OSGOOD & CO., Publishers, 

BOSTON. 

Messrs. James K. Osgood & Co. have the pleasure of annouDcing that 
by the desire of the President and Fellows of Harvard College, they are 
now publishing Heliotype reproductions of the principal art treasures of 
the " Gray Collection of Engravings," owned by Harvard College. This 
Collection is one of the most complete and perfect in the country. It con- 
tains the choicest and most costly proofe of many of the best engravers of 
the world, and is especially rich in the original works of Albert Durer, 
Rembrandt, Marc-Antonio, Lukas Van Leyden, Caracci, and others. It 
comprises the best engravings of Raphael Morghen, Longhi, Toschi, Ander 
loni, MuUer, "Willie, Desnoyers, Mandel, Strange, Sharpe, "WooUet, and 
other leading engravers, from the pictures of Raphael, Titian, Correggio, 
Guido, Leonardo da Vinci, Murillo and other celebrated artists. The por- 
traits by Velazquez, Van Dyck and others, and the engraved heads of dis- 
tinguished persons by Nanteuil, Edelinck, Masson and Houbraken are a 
most important feature of the collection. 

The publishers are enabled by means of the rapidity, faithfulness and 
artistic quality of the Heliotype Process, to oflfer beautiful reproductions 
from the choicest aod most costly works of art at the lowest possible prices. 
Rare etchings or artist-proof engravings worth hundreds of dollars each, 
may be reproduced and sold at prices varying from fifty cents to two or 
three dollars, thus bringing the treasures of art-galleries within the reach 
of all, and aflfording a means of art-education hitherto unattainable. 
About 70 subjects are now ready. 

Special prices made with Colleges and Institutions of Learning.' Nearly 
10,000 prints have been sold to the students of Harvard. 

W. T. GOOBALE, FnbUshers' Agent, 

,For Bowdoin College. 



Vol. III. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, FEBRUARY 11, 1874. 



No. 14. 



ENXUI. 



For The Oeiest. 



Iliivinfr rcvude with cogitations vast 

Tliere words indigenous and awl iu raue 

Endevird 2 discover 'mongst them all 

Sum Icomlynacion oph the vary us sines 

Wbitch R called letters that iun there ej-ed-ear 

Wood fully & completely wrepresent 

A previously unlabelled statu of mynd 

The luglish loxioograffers arose 

& sed what hinders now that we shood go 

Un 2 another poeple if purchants 

"Wo ma in ouglit in there tung discover that 

■Whitoh in hour own is wanting. Then they hide 

Across the channel 2 that sonny land 

Within hooso borders dwel that hurbano wraoe 

Bevourcrs oph the doomed liatrakian trybe ; 

Nor liuoaded they to labor long 2 And 

A word eggs Aokle}' sooted to their mynd. 

Tiz knot ray purpose 2 till all o' jyzo 

Or solve the deap and hidden Mr. Iz 

Buy whitoh the 'nunseeation is X planed ; 

Awl that eye oomproheud about the last 

Iz that tho " eun" may knot be always " ong" 

Nun will dispute but " U" & "I " are " "Wo." 

But now my phelo phrend let me supozo 

That ewer afflicted & ilo diagnoze. 

The day is harmy and the golden son 

Lukes down on awl the bizzy world B-lo 

"While hornets & muskoytoes bugs aud ilize 

Beguile the lazy daze monotony — 

Or else tiz foggy & U have tho chills 

Or else tiz midnito & U can knot sleep 

Or else tiz rainy & U cant go out 

Or TJ R may king liitiouablo calls 

Or waiting at tlie station for the train 

Or any sir come stands or plaoo or time 

May intervene wherever twill & when 

It makes know difference so U R doomed. 

Perhaps U will not fully realize 

The near approaeh of this peculiar state 

Until ower sunk within a see of donbt 

Aud wander oph to strange absurdities. 

Then ulo begin to ponder on the past 

Recount yuro greefs & foybles 1 by 1 

& if as liltely U have caws for joy 

In any sir come stands that has occurred 

You will account it awl a bitter farce 

And quote satyric poetry to prove 

"What seems is not whenever it seems well. 



Tule say with Shaikspcer all the world's a stage 

& sa without him all the ackters phools — 

That all creation is a monstrous fraud 

Composed of little frauds of whitoh yure one, 

"What then a veils that you have ever gained 

Applaws from men or from the gentler sex 

A goodly mead of prays or phlattery ? 

If ure a bass ball hero you wood feign 

Xohange ewer plaice & bee a senseless bat 

If it is senseless and if it is not 

You'd have the pliuu oph nokkiug others round 

Or you wood ho tho ball and madly phly 

Throughout the region now prohibited 

2 poor vermicular man who creeps & crawls 

Upon the lower earth — Heaven pity him ! 

R U a gal aunt then oph what a veil 

Iz the wremenibrants of unnum bird smiles 

Olgrncicmsly B stode upon ewer selph 

By wradyant huetiz and there shrude mamas ? ! 

In-short at-length U will B shuro 2 phind 

That theres no kawling traid or work in life 

Know welthy Ile-goatist or nmblo saynt 

But is akwayuted with tho dred enntf. 

jMAW RUfi. 

The retchid lyke come pauions sow they sa 
And be a showered my cnnui^lio friend 
U R not solus — and besides take cheer 
Tiz never lasting & must alwaze end. 



BOWDOIN IN THE EAST. 

Calais, Jmi. 25ih, 1874. 

The fourth annual reunion of the " Bow- 
cloin Association of tho East," assembled for 
business and pleasure at the International 
Hotel, Calais, Jan. 23, Hon. F. A. Pike, class 
'39, in the chair. 

The meeting was called to order about 10 
P.M. Gen. G. F. Granger, '58, Acting Secre- 
tarj', gave tlie report of tire last meeting. 
The nominating committee reported the fol- 
lowing officers for the ensuing year: Presi- 
dent — Chas. C. Porter, '32. Vice Presidents 
—Dr. C. E. Swan, '44; Dr. Wm. H. Todd, 
'53. Executive Committee — C. A. Board- 



158 



BOWBOIN ORIENT. 



man, '66 ; C. B. Rounds, '61, and C. F. Todd, 
'54. Treasurer — G. F. Granger, '58. Sec- 
retary — C. A. Boardman, '66. 

The proposition to discontinue the prize 
known as the " St. Croix Prize " of $50, 
offered, for excellence in debate, to the Gen- 
eral Societies, provoked considerable discus- 
sion. Much dissatisfaction was expressed that 
the Societies had^ not responded in fuller 
measm-e to the Association's offer. It was 
voted to discontinue the prize unless some 
decided progress should be discovered this 
year over previous years. Gen. G. F. Gran- 
ger, '58, and F. H. Boardman, '69, were ap- 
pointed a committee of investigation. 

C. A. Boardman, '66, moved that the 
Association request our Representative at 
Augusta not to vote for any further appro- 
priations for the Maine State Agricultural 
College unless it be removed to Brunswick 
and placed under the same government with 
Bowdoin. The Agricultural College had 
already received State aid to the amount of 
$200,000, or thereabouts, in addition to the 
land grant from the General Government. 
(Which land, by the way, was sold during 
Gov. Cony's administration for 44c. to 60c. 
per acre, while Cornell got $2 per acre for the 
New York lands, and they are finding fault 
with him for tliis disposition. What shall we 
say for Cony? Did he or his Council reap 
what was sown for the agricultural interests of 
our State ? ) 

This idea of uniting the two institutions 
would prove of mutual benefit to both. For 
Avhat facilities Bowdoin offers at present 
could be expanded with less assistance from 
the State, sufficient to impart a lasting vitality 
to this agricultural department, than will be 
necessary, isolated as at present, to keep it 
alive. 

Much interest was expressed in the pres- 
ent as well as in the prospective welfare of 
our Alma Mater, and the recent action of the 
members of the Boards in subscribing over 



$40,000 for her permanent endowment fund 
was considered a good exponent of her future 
expansion and prosperity. 

Upon adjourning to the dining hall the 
true sphere of the Eastern graduate was at 
once recognized ; for what shortcomings might 
be attributed to them in any other capacity, 
their capacity for the enjoyment of a good 
dinner remains unquestioned, and our host of 
the International did not on this occasion 
compromise his reputation for the preparation 
of a good dinner. In fact, 

" The board 
Was ■svith excellent viands so lavishly stored, 
That in newspaper phrase 't tvonld undoubtedly groan, 
If groaning were but a convivial tone. 
And therefore, by sympathy led, 
The table no doubt was rejoicing instead." 

A letter of regrets was read by the Secre- 
tary from Rev. Wm. Carruthers, for his ab- 
sence on the occasion, in which he proposed a 
fitting toast to our Alma Mater. 

Gen. Granger, after several calls, gave us 
one of his inimitable after-dinner speeches. 
Influenced in great measure by the excellent 
repast of which we had just partaken, he 
chose for his subject "A Good Dinner," pre- 
facing his remarks with the following toast : 
" May we never deserve a poorer one, and if 
we do may we never receive our deserts 
(desserts) until after dinner." But any report 
I might attempt of what manner he related 
the fondness of all persons in all ages for 
good diiiners, from the King of Egypt to the 
King of the Cannibal Islands (whose favorite 
dish we learned at Sunday - School was a mis- 
sionary, Bangor or Andover theological stu- 
dents preferred), and bringing out in pleasing 
contrast the antipathy in which poor dinners 
are held by all, citing by way of illustration 
several of each class of dinners he had par- 
taken of, would, I fear, do but meagre justice 
to the effort. 

After the customary toasts and converse 
of such occasions, the party arose from the 
table, voted the whole afi^air a success, and 



B WD OIN ORIENT. 



159 



the Association adjoumecl with the resolution 
to re-assemble at the same place at about one 
year from that time. 



THE PETITION BEFORE THE 
BOARDS. 

We regret that our criticism on the action 
of the Boards in regard to the Military De- 
partment was uuavoidabl}' crowded out of our 
last number. Our opinion, however, could 
easily be surmised from our expressions on 
former occasions. We have, from the outset, 
been warm supporters of the petition, and we 
shared the general surprise at its treatment at 
the hands of the Boards. 

The j^etition represented, as is well known, 
the honest opinions and earnest wishes of the 
students of the college. It was signed by 
126 of the 133 students comprising- the three 
upper classes. It was an opinion and wish 
that had been long entertained, and in many 
ways expressed. It was the result of practi- 
cal experience with the drill, and intense dis- 
satisfaction resulting from that experience. 

No spirit of insubordination actuated the 
petitioners in this step. It was believed not 
that the Military Department would be abol- 
ished on the mere presentation of the petition, 
but that, coming from the source it did, it 
would receive a fair and candid consideration. 
It was believed that the members of the 
Boards were candid men who would have no 
disposition to dodge the issue or slight the 
request of the students, and who would per- 
ceive the imprudence of unnecessarily acquir- 
ing the ill-will of those who are so soon to 
become the Alumni and the patrons of the 
college, if patrons it is ever to have. 

That all might be prepared to meet the 
question, a circular was sent to all the mem- 
bers of the Boards and of the Faculty, stating 
the object and nature of the petition. It was 
also requested that some one of our number 



might be allowed to appear before them to 
advocate our cause. 

Were not these fair and manly steps ? Did 
they not entitle the petitioners to be treated 
as men, and be met in a manly way ? 

And now, what have the Boards done in 
response? At their first meeting, although 
they did not have time to consider the petition 
in fall, the)^ gave every assurance that it should 
receive respectful and careful attention. A 
committee was appointed to hear our advocate, 
and it was requested that an argument be pre- 
pared in our behalf and presented at the next 
meeting of the Boards. And what at the 
next meeting of the Boards ? 

No more notice was taken of the petition 
tlian of the drifting of the snow about old 
jNIassachusetts ; the petition was not even 
considered ; the whole matter was passed over 
in disdainful silence. 

Is it not natural that we feel indignant at 
this contemptuous treatment? 

It is not that our petition is not granted ; 
we did not expect that our request woidd be- 
come, without question, the decision of the 
Boards. 

But we did expect that in a matter in 
which we are the ones most concerned, in 
which our interests are at stake, our opinions 
and wishes would be of some moment. We 
did not expect to be treated as mere menials, 
who have no voice whatever in controlling 
affahs of so much moment to themselves, and 
whose suggestions are scornfully spurned. We 
believe we went forward to the issue in a 
manly waj"-, and placed ourselves on manly 
ground. We believe that the Boards have 
taken a most unmanly step, and treated us in 
a most dishonorable way. 

The men Avhom you have thus disdained 
will soon be those to whom you will look for 
assistance and encouragement, whom you will 
expect to be patrons of the college. We 
predict that the men now in college will 
hardly fulfil these expectations. 



160 



B WD OIN ORIENT. 



THEORIES. 

The learned have often amused themselves 
by publishing the follies of the ignorant, but 
if the ignorant would once retaliate by pub- 
lishing the follies of the learned, they might 
give the world a book that would not be dull, 
although it would be large. 

For instance, a collection of some of the 
extravagant theories which have, at one time 
and another of the world's history, been prop- 
agated, would be sure to be entertaining and 
amusing, and it is quite certain that it avouM 
not be unprofitable. 

The multitude of theories that have been 
advanced, and the number of volumes that 
have been written, not to examine but to 
defend them, would be found to be appalling. 
Sach a collection would show that there is no 
notion too strange to get into men's minds, 
and no theory too absurd to find defenders, 
and that the most ridiculous theories have 
sometimes emanated from the most dignified 
sources. The few items that are collected 
here are not the result of any study of the 
subject, but are only such as have been met 
by chance in general reading, and are taken 
entirely at random. 

Tacitus, in his description of the Island of 
Britain, says : " The da}^ is longer than ours, 
and the night clear and, in the extremity of Brit- 
ain, so short that j"ou can distinguish the end 
from the beginning of light, only by a very 
brief interval. If the clouds do not interfere, 
it is affirmed that the splendor of the sun can 
be seen throughout the night; neither does it 
rise and set, but passes round." Then, with- 
out examining into the truth of the phenome- 
non, he advances this astonishing theory to 
account for it : " Doubtless that level extrem- 
ity of the earth, by reason of its low shadow 
does not create darkness." 

Herodotus, as translated hj Boele, gives 
the following novel theorj^ to account for the 
overflowing and other phenomena of the Nile : 
" But as I. have mentioned the preceding 



opinions only to censure and confute them, I 
may be expected, perhaps, to give my own 
sentiments on this subject. It is my opinion 
that the Nile overflows in the summer season, 
because in the winter the sun driven by 
storms from his usual course, ascends into the 
higher regions of the air above Lib5''a. My 
reason may be explained without difficulty, 
for it may be easily supposed that to whatever 
region this power more nearly approaches, the 
rivers and streams of that country will be 
proportionally dried up and diminished." 

The following, half theory, half prophecy, 
was published by a member of the British 
Parliament about the time of the last war 
with England : " Stationed thus in the middle 
and on the east and on the west sides of the 
world, the Americans will form not only the 
most potent, but the most singular empire 
that has ever existed ; because it will consist 
not in the dominion of a part of the land of 
the globe, but in a dominion of the whole 
ocean. To all nations their empire will be 
dreadful ; because their ships will sail where- 
ever billows roll or winds can waft them, and 
because their jaeople, capable of subsisting 
either almost wholly on the produce of the 
waters by means of their fisheries, or on the 
plunder and contributions of mankind, if they 
choose to do so, will require few of their num- 
bers to be employed in manufactures or hus- 
bandry at home, and therefore, like the ancient 
Spartans who defied all the power of Persia, 
or the Romans who pillaged the sea coasts of 
Europe, the occupation of every citizen will 
be, not in the common employments of peace, 
but in the powers of offense and defense 
alone. Whether they may have arts and let- 
ters, will be a matter of chance. If they 
shall not be blessed with them, they will once 
more plunge the world into the same darkness 
which nations have thrown upon each other 
probably miich oftener than history can tell ; 
and when that happens, England Avith her 
glories and all her liberty, will te known only 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



161 



as a speck in the map of the world, as ancient 
Eg^-pt, Sicilj', Pontus,and Carthage, are now." 

It was certainly an original and striking- 
idea that, hecause our territory was bounded 
on either side by the ocean, we were to be- 
come a nation of pirates. If one were dis- 
posed to be hypercritical it might, to be sure, 
be asserted tliat the position and history of 
the countries which are alluded to, and in fact 
all the reasons Ijrought forward in support of 
the theory, do go directly against it, but this 
is no rare thing with theorists. If the theory 
does not happen to conform to facts then facts 
must be made to conform to the theor}-. 

Some years ago a periodical published this 
theory to account for the first x^eopling of the 
American continent : " We think there is 
suffieient reason to believe that land once 
connected America to the old world, in place 
of which now roll the Atlantic and Pacific 
oceans. Over this continuous land, men and 
animals passed. This land, which it is prob- 
able was of very considerable extent, was all 
submerged, except in those parts of it which 
now appear as islands in those seas." 

This has certainly the merit of novelty, 
and if, in connection with it, the idea that the 
Indians are the descendants of the " ten lost 
tribes " be accepted, a \cvj simple solution of 
this difficult problem would be furnished, 
and the Indian question forever settled. After 
assuming as a fact that land once occupied 
the places of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, 
there is much ingenious modesty in suggesting 
that it is probable that this land was of very 
considerable extent. 

These are all reasonable compared with 
some theories that have been advanced. May 
not the ideas advanced by some modern 
theorists, in the light of a more perfect 
knowledge, appear as ridiculous ? C. C. 



The Juniors are to have Pres. Chamber- 
lain in Political Ecorkomy. 



INTER - COLLEGIATE CONVENTION. 

The undersigned earnestly invite each of the 
colleges of the United States, to send three dele- 
gates to an Inter-CoUegiato Literary Convention at " 
the Allyn House, Hartford, Conu., Feb. 19th, at 10 
A.M. The object of such a convention can he 
briefly explained. It has long been a subject of re- 
proach that students from different institutions 
never met as contestants, except to display their 
physical powers, and it is thought that contests in 
scholarship, essay- vn-iting, and oratory, may be both 
pleasant and profitable. Discussions to this effect 
have been carried on in the collegiate and public 
press for several months past, the general tone of 
which leads us to believe that the movement will be 
acceptable. Correspondence with distinguished 
educators and professional men has elicited the fact 
that Presidents McCosh, Porter, Chadbourne, and 
Stearns, Chancellor Crosby, Col. Higginson, Jas. T. 
Fields, and others are in cordial sympathy with us. 
If consistent with other engagements, Col. Higgin- 
son will address the convention. It is recommended 
that delegates be appointed as quicldy as possible, 
and that they consult their Faculty as to the best 
means of promoting the proposed contests. The 
success of the movement will largely depend on 
their ability and discretion, and if tbey come pre- 
pared to ofi'er a plan, there is little doubt that by 
fusion of all the good qualities suggested, a wctfk will 
be accomplished which must quickly advance the 
educational interests of the country. We hope that 
post-graduate study and examinations will be one 
of the ultimate results. We quote a few words of 
approval which have been received from various 
sources : — 

" In manifold ways, this kind of inter-collegiate 
intercourse is likely, if wisely conducted, to be of 
advantage. The arena here, it will be borne in 
mind, is not hedged in by those limitations in place 
and in number to which the contests in physical 
gymnastics are the subject, Representatively, all 
the colleges of the land, and indeed of all lands, 
irrespectively of geographical and national bound- 
aries, may in the possibilities of things participate 
in them. It is to be hoped the form of the proposed 
organism will be in as broad proportions as the 
nature of the case will admit." — College Courant. 

" Your proposition in general, I would cheerfully 
encourage, as likely to increase public interest and 
personal attainment in literature and science." — 
Pres. Stearns. 

"Such an institution (Inter-Collegiate) willgreatly 
increase the efficiency of our colleges, acting as a 
spur both to students and instructors. Colleges, 
moreover, will then take rank according to a just 
scale, not according to number — a most fallacious 
criterion — but according to work turned out." — • 
Chancellor Crosby. 

Hoping for immediate and judicious action, we 
remain. 

(Signed,) Williams College : C. B. Hubbell, W. 
D. Edmunds, J. H. Herrick. Princeton College : 
S. J. McPherson, W. F. Henney, G. B. Halsted. 

February .3d, 1874. 



162 



BOWDOm ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED ETEET ALTERNATE "VSTEDSTESDAT DUE- 
IN(} THE COLLEGIATE TEAR AT 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE, 
Br THE Class of 1874. 

EDITORS. 

S. Y. Cole, L. H. Kimball, 

W. T. GooDALE, D. O. S. Lowell, 

P. W. Hawthorne, F. K. Wheeler, 

H. K. White. 

Terms — $2 00 a j'ear in advance; siugle copies, 
15 cents. 

Address cominunicatious to Bowdoin Orient, 
Brunswick, Maine. 

For sale at 7 Appleton Hall, Bowdoiu College. 
Also by J. Griffin and B. G. Denuison, Brunswick ; 
and A. Williams & Co., 135 Washington St., Boston. 

CONTENTS. 
Vol. III., No. 14. — Feb. 11, 1874. 

Ennui. (Poem.) 157 

Bowdoin in the East. '. 157 

The Petition before the Boards 159 

Theories 160 

Inter - Collegiate Literarj' Convention 161 

Editorial Notes 162 

Local 164 

Alumni Record 165 

Gleanings 166 

Editors' Table 167 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



By a misprint in our last number the sub- 
ject of Kate Stanton's lecture was made to 
read " The Lives of Great Men," instead of 
" The Loves of Great Men." 



In the communication which we publish 
this week, from a member of the Bowdoin 
Association of the East, our readers in college 
will please note what is said about the " St. 
Croix Prize." 



One of the best sermons we. have heard 
for some time, was preached at the Congre- 
gational Church, Feb. 1, by the Rev. Mr. 
Byington. Text: "And this is life eternal, 
that they might know thee the only true God, 
and Jesus Christ, whom thou hast sent." 



Occasionally we have the pleasure of hear- 
ing a first-class concert even in Brunswick. 
The Temple Quartette made us one of their 
very welcome visits a short time since, and 
tlie musical treat they furnished was appre- 
ciated by a large audience. We wish they 
would come oftener. 



We see from the Targuni^ the college paper 
published at Rutgers, that Professor Rockwood 
is already popular with his classes. We are 
glad to learn that success in this respect is 
following so soon in his steps. We knew it 
would be so sooner or later, for Prof. Rock- 
wood is a man to be respected both as teacher 
and associate. 



Why wouldn't it be a good plan to have a 
little more light in the Reading Room ? We 
ask the question not to find fault with the 
new order of things, for there is no need of 
that sort of criticism now, but simply to call 
the attention of the committee to the fact 
that, as it is, the Reading Room is not suffi- 
ciently lighted. Another lamp hung in the 
centre of the room would be a vast improve- 
ment, and save much eye -straining for those 
who wish to read. 



Why, also, would it not be a good plan to 
have a little — no, a considerable — more heat 
in the gymnasium. It seems rather barbarous 
to huddle us in there, where the atmosphere 
is so damp and cold that exercise without 
gloves and overcoats is anything but comfort- 
able. 



BO WD OUST ORLENT. 



163 



It is difficult to tell just what the rule is 
at Bowdoin ia regard to the appointment of 
Commencement Parts. So far as we can judge 
from the past it is about this — every graduate 
is appointed to some part and is obliged to 
hand in Iiis manuscript; every man who desires 
to do so can get excused from delivering what 
he has written, and tlie remainder, generally 
a little more than half the class, entertain the 
audience on Commencement Day. 

But Commencement audiences generally, 
most certainly at Bowdoin, are fast getting 
wearied of this tedious display of young 
rhetoric. No one wants to annihilate Com- 
mencement Day, but the demand for shorter 
programmes and fewer appointments is almost 
universal. Though it will be the turn of our 
class next to receive appointments and stir up 
the sleepy public, we would welcome any 
reform in this direction among us. 



The college press, and indeed the secular 
press in general, have, of late, ])een discussing, 
to some extent, the advantages and feasibility 
of an inter -collegiate literary contest. It 
would, indeed, be no little discredit to the col- 
legiate youth of our country, if the develop- 
ment of brain could not share their attention 
equally with the development of muscle. The 
former is as much more important than the 
latter, as mind is higher than matter. Mental 
culture is, of course, the main object for which 
our colleges are established, wliile jihysical 
culture is a mere side-show. 

We do not mean, however, to underrate 
the importance of the latter, or disparage the 
good effects of the manly sports, and the prom- 
inence given at the present day to these phys- 
ical contests. We only claim for the mind a 
still higher importance, and demand to its cul- 
ture still greater attention. 

But this is all known and felt, and the 
great advantage to be derived from literary 
contests, even on so large a scale as is pro- 



posed, is universalljr recognized. But, is the 
plan a practicable one ? Can these contests 
excite enough interest and command enough 
attention to be successful? That they can 
ever attain as much importance, and cause as 
much excitement as the inter-collegiate boat- 
race, is not to be expected from their very 
nature. The public, at least, can never be 
stirred to such enthusiasm as they displayed 
last year at Springfield, over any contest of 
purely literary nature. Nor could the colleges 
themselves enter into such a contest with the 
zealous rivalry the}^ have of late exhibited in 
the struggle with the oar. There is one evi- 
dent reason for this. The phj-sical contest is 
decided by predominance of training, by ex- 
cess of ijracticed muscle, acquired, to a great 
extent, by vigorous exercise, and is open, 
therefore, to all who are willing to work hard 
for the privilege. Tlie literary contest, on the 
other hand, is settled by superiority of talent, 
to a great extent, and participation in it will 
be the sole heritage of the intellectual aristoc- 
racy. 

Again, boating is a sport, aud however 
hard work may be made of it, it will never 
become anything else. But study and 
thought and intellectual training can never 
be play, even to the most ardent votary of 
literature. 

But yet, could such contests be inaugu- 
rated, there is little doubt, we think, that col- 
lege honor would soon become identified with 
literary pre-eminence, and considerable rivalry 
thus aroused. 

Certain it is that such contests would be 
free from all those immoral influences which 
have now become the invariable attendants of 
the bat and the oar. 

It is to be hoped, then, that the idea will 
be carried into execution, and that the col- 
leges will respond to the invitation of Wil- 
liams and Princeton by sending delegates to 
the convention appointed for Feb. 19, at 
Hartford. 



164 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



LOCAL. 

Paradise is in " hard lines." 

The band practices daily in the g3'mnasium. 

Who stole the beef ? Brad. Who burned 
it ? Dave. 

Giirdjian, '77^ is lecturing the Scientific 
Juniors on Photography. 

The "clear-quill operetta" will be put on 
the stage about the first of March. 

The cold weather has put an end to the 
mania for midnight lunches at the depot. 

Why is the loss of a sister a greater calam- 
ity than that of a brother? Answer — Be- 
cause it is a "soror" affliction. 

The Seniors, are studying " Outhnes of 
Man," one of Pres. Hopkins's latest books. 
They are most fortunate in having Pres. Hop- 
kins himself as instructor. 

We hear frequent rumors and complaints, 
that the recitation rooms are not comfortablj'' 
Avarm during the cold weather. We knoiv 
that that is sometimes (?) the case. 

A student who was "striking out all 
round " was told that he was fast becoming 
an Esau. " O, no ! " he exclaimed, " but my 
chum is a hairy man" (Harriman). 

We accidentally overheard two Juniors 

thus conversing: "Only think, F , this is 

'74, next year will be '75, and then .' .' " " Ah ! 
yes, how soon that then will become the now!" 

How pleasant these cold winter mornings 
to "turn out" at seven o'clock, hurry down 
to the Tontine, or elsewhere, hurry through 
breakfast, and hurry back to pra^yers at twenty 
minutes past eight ! 

We often hear the fairy foot -falls of a 
Freshman, who is, evidently, an adept in the 
art of clog dancing. His time is excellent, 
and the energy and vim with which he plants 



his "fiddle boxes " can be appreciated only by 
those who room beneath them. 

At the meeting of the stockholders of the 
Bowdoin Telegraph Association, the following 
officers were chosen : G. R. Swasey, Presi- 
dent ; Orestes Pierce, Manager ; E. H. Noyes, 
Secretary and Treasurer ; H. G. Briggs, Mjdes 
Standish, WiU Alden, Directors. 

The Seniors have successfully weathered 
a " quiz " on three weeks' lectures on Military 
Science. Ten comprehensive questions were 
given the class, to which written answers were 
required. " It was only a matter of time" 
one of the class complacently remarked, after 
spending some two hours on them. 

The Bowdoin Telegraph Company was 
organized on the 20th. The officers are : 
President, W. H. G. Rowe ; Superintendent, 
E. B. Newcomb. The company's wires ex- 
tend from Winthrop to Appleton, and gentle- 
manly operators are in constant attendance. 
The first message sent over the wires is 
worthy of note : " That child (not colored) 
has been removed from any dangerous prox- 
imity to the mule. Warup ! " 

The opera advertised in the Bugle will 
take place in Lemont Hall, about the first of 
March. The College Orchestra is at present 
practicing on the music, and St. Giles has 
been absent for a week past making arrange- 
ments for scenery, costumes, etc. The Avork 
when finished may differ materially from the 
plan in the advertisement, but a general 
prominence will be given to local characters 
and scenes. No pains or expense will be 
spared to make it a success. 

A "travelling merchant" who was ped- 
dling patent inkstands — inkstands which hold 
the ink. best when placed bottom upwards — 
had disposed of two of the " wonders," and 
was politely and smihngly bowing himself out 
of the door which he had nearly closed in 
front of him, when he found his rear in close 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



165 



proximity to LarreLs, coal-liocis, kerosene cans, 
and other things usually to be foiind in a 
student's wood closet. He was then kindly 
informed that perhaps he had mistaken the 
door. Expressing his thanks for this timely 
information, Ijlushing and embarrassed, he this 
time bowed himself safely out, only to hear 
the not to be restrained laucrhter from within. 



ALUJ^INI liECORD. 



[We earnestly request contril)Utions for this 
department from the Alumni and fricuds of the 
College.] 

Class of '70. 

Where they are and what they are doincj, so 

far as heard from. 

D.S.Alexander — Ft. Wayne, Ind. Man- 
aging Editor of Daily and Weekly Gazette. 
Married — No boy? 

C. E. Beale — Washington, D.C. Clerk in 
Pension OfSee. Has been admitted to the bar. 

L. Z. Collins — Mass. Teaching, 

Lancaster, Mass. Principal High School. 
Married — Girl. 

Albert J. Curtis— Bath, Me. Married. 

W. E. Frost — Westford, Mass. Teach- 
ing High School. Married — Boy. 

0. B. Grant — Providence, R. I. Teach- 
ing Higli School. Married. 

Albert Gray, Jr. — ■ Boston, Mass. Study- 
ing Law. Married. 

John H. Gooch — Lewistou, Me. Study- 
ing Law. Married. 

Lucien Howe — Studying Medicine in 
Germany. 

P. E. Hanson — Lafaj^ette, Ind. Teacher, 
High School. Not married, but ought to be. 

E. Hammons — Bethel, Me. Practicing 
Law, and dealing in lumber. 

G. W. Hobson — Saco, Me. Lumber dealer. 

W. E. Holmes — Oshkosh, Wis. Proprie- 
tor Business College. 

J. W.Keene- — 31 Lynde St., Boston, Mass. 
Studying Medicine. 



B. E. Melcher — Saco, Me. Principal 
High School. 

C. H. Moore — Brunswick, Me. Instruc- 
tor in Bowdoin College. 

W. H. Meads— 44 East Mohawk St., Buf- 
falo, N. Y. Teaching. Married — No boy. 

W. K. Oakes — New York City, Bellevue 
Hospital. Studying and practicing Medicine. 

Caleb A. Page — Warren, Mass. Teach- 
ing. Married. 

R. M. Peck — Ellsworth, Me. Not yet 
recovered his health. Stud3'ing Medicine. 

J. B. Redman — Ellsworth, Me. Practic- 
ing Law. 

E. F. Redman — "Rat" — Ellsworth, Me. 
Lumber dealer. 

J. A. Roberts — Buffalo, N.Y. (School No. 
20 Blackrock). Teaching and studying Law. 
Married. Boy. 

W. E. Spear — ilinistry. Graduated at 
Bangor Seminary, 1873. 

D. T. Timberlake — Wilton, Me. Teach- 
ing. Married. 

C. T. Torrey— New York City. Belle- 
vue Hospital. 

A. G. Whitman — 31 Lynde street, Boston, 
Mass. Studying Medicine. 

E. B. Weston — Lewiston, Me. Practic- 
ing Medicine. 

E. C.Woodward — 31 Lynde street, Bos- 
ton, Mass. Studying Chemistry, Institute of 
Technology. 



The Bowdoin Alumni Association of New 
York held its fourth annual dinner at the 
Westminster Hotel, Thursday evening. The 
President of the Association, Joseph H. Hub- 
bard, presided, and among the number present 
were Gen. J. L. Chamberlain, President of 
the College; Prof. A. S. Packard; Prof. 
Brackett of Princeton ; and Prof. Morse, lect- 
urer at Cooper Institute ; William H. Allen, 
President of Girard College, Philadelphia ; 
Rev. Dr. Adams of Orange, N. J. ; Rev. Dr. 
Barrett of Philadelphia ; Prof. R. D. Hitch- 



1 



166 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



cock, Prof. J. Fordyee Baker, Isaac H. Bailej^ 
and others. The company were seated at 
dinner from 6.30 to 10.30 p.m., when brief 
speeches were made by President Chamber- 
lain, Profs. Packard, Hitchcock, Morse, and 
others. 



aLEANINGS. 

The Junior was rather bluffed, when he 
told a Preshman that it was compulsory to 
buy a promenade ticket, by the reply that he 
(the Freshman) did not compel worth a darn. 

An excited father called in great haste on 
Dr. Abernethy, and exclaimed, " Doctor, doc- 
tor ! my boy has swallowed a mouse ! " " Then 
go home," quietly rej)lied the doctor, " and 
tell him to swallow a cat ! " 

The Madlsonensis saj's a Senior, while 
"asking the blessing," was discovered to have 
one eye open, covering a fine piece of roast 
which he had contrived to get on his plate. 
On being reprimanded, he returned, "Doesn't 
the Bible say ' watch and pray ? ' " 

At Yale the faculty have prohibited the 
playing of musical instruments in the college 
buildings, except on Wednesday and Saturday 
afternoons, and on other days between the 
hours of 12 and 2.30, and 6 and 8 p.m. Vio- 
lators of this rule wiU be compelled to remove 
their instruments from the college. 

The Cornell Era says a young lady of a 
mathematical turn of mmd, was endeavoring 
to enlighten her classmates in regard to a cer- 
tain xjrojjosition in Geometry. Bringing in, 
in the course of her demonstration, a good 
many statements which her professor thought 
quite irrelevant, he suggested that she should 
confine herself to the subject under consider- 
ation, when she promptly "rephed, " she had 
now arrived at that point in the proposition 
where a generalization of the subject would 
be quite advantageous." 



Freshman (translates) — " The flower of 
the Roman army," &c. Tutor — " Why were 
they called fhe flotver of the army?" Fresh- 
man (modestly) — "I don't know, sir ; but if 
it were not an anachronism, I should suppose 
it was because they had pistils." — Yale Oou- 
rant. 

A contemporary calculates how many peo- 
ple could be got together in one square mile, 
and finds it to be 6,965,000 ; and thus that 
the whole population of the United States 
could stand on six square miles. If it is a 
question of packing them close, we must take 
the horse-cars of New York City, in which, 
on a surface of sixty-five square feet, fre- 
quently sixty -five persons are huddled to- 
gether, or one for each square foot. As a 
square mile contains 27,873,400 square feet, 
it is clear that at this rate the population of 
the United States could be packed together 
into one and a half square miles, and that of 
the whole earth in a space' of about six and a 
quarter miles square. J 

The poem for the benefit of our agricul- 
tural students Avas received last week so 
gratefully that we venture to insert another 
for our scientific students, especially for those 
who have concluded courses in physiology 
and psychology. It is entitled a scientific 
love song, and is very considerably so. 

Pray tell me, my own dainty darling, 

About your centripetal nerve ; 
Is your cerebral ganglion Tvorking 

In a manner I like to observe i 
Does the gray matter answer my pleading, 

And cause vaso -motors to move? 
Ab, dearest, do let the medulla 

Obligita respond to my love. 
Tour corpora quadrigemini, sweet one, 

As also the pons varoli, 
I love with an earuest aft'ection. 

The result of complex stimuli. 
And this co-ordination of atoms 

My cerebrum will still carry on, 
Till cardiac motion be ended 

And peripheral feeling be gone. 
Then relax all your facial muscles 

As the nerves of ambilion vibrate ; 
Of your heterogeneous feelings 

Make a dear homogeneous state. 
When the gauglia, growing compounded. 

In the great bi-lobed mass effloresce, 
Let them send through the thorax sensation 

To prompt an articulate "Tes." 

— Cornell Times. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



167 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



The following beautiful lines may be new 
to some of our readers : — 
I. 
" The night has a thoasand eyes, 

Aud the day bat one ; 
Yet the light of the briglit day dies 
"With the dying sun. 
II. 
" The mind has a thousand eyes, 

Aud the heart but one; 
Tet the light of a whole life dies, 
"When love is done." 

The Williams Vidette wanting to know 
who wrote them, the Courant makes reply 
that they first appeared in the Spectator., Oct. 
25th, 1873, aud that the author is F. W. Bour- 
dillon, of Worcester College, Oxford. Here 
is a German translation also from the Specta- 
tor : — 

I. 
" Tausend Augen hat die N"acht, 

Bins nur giebt deni Tage Licht ; 
Bach orlisoht dor Welten Pracht, 
"Wenn der Sonne glauz gebrioht. 
II. 
" Tausend Augen hat der Geist, 

Kins uur hat die Jlerz dabei ; 
Dauh eiii gauzes Lebou rcisst 
Hit der Leibon Tod eutzwei." 

There is something in the sentiment and 
simplicity of this little poem to remind us of 
another little waif : — 

" Gestern liebt' ich, 
Heuto Icid' ioh : 
Morgen sterb' ich, 
Deuuoch denk' ich, 
lleut' und morgen 
Gern an gesteru." 

What a quantity of gems like these are 
found scattered through the different liter- 
atures ; they live and sparkle when more pre- 
tentious things are forgotten. 

The last number of the Williams Vidette 
devotes rather less space to its literary depart- 
ment than do many of our exchanges. To 
be sure, this detracts a little from its value as 
an exchange, but does it not make it a better 



college paper ? We think it no detriment to 
a paper's reputation, aud no small compliment 
to its editors, nowadays, to say that any par- 
ticular number is a better number for the col- 
lege it represents than for any other college. 
The great fault with many of us seems to be 
that we lay too much stress on oiu? literary 
articles, simply because they are literary, and 
too little on what is strictty editorial. The 
" Brick Moon," " Age of Pericles," or " Rail- 
road Corporation " is as likelj^ to be discussed 
as "Inter-collegiate Contests," " Boating," and 
other everyday local matters which interest 
the students. We venture to say that the last 
columns perused by our readers are the ones 
given to the literary department. And why? 
Because tlie best magazines furnish things so 
much better. Whether, then, some one asks, 
would we ignore literary articles altogether? 
Certainly not. They have their use ; they 
act as stimulants to the ambitious, and afford 
their authors at least, profit as well as pleas- 
ure ; they also give "tone" to a paper. But 
so far as fame is concerned, the best we can 
do at it, as a general rule, is to win a sort of 
half-heaven-and- earth reputation; when we 
would soar we only betray too often how 
weak our wing power is, or that our feathers 
have not yet grown. 

The Madisonensis discourses very sensibly 
on the use a student should make of his time 
while in college. Its conclusions agree so 
thoroughly with our own that we should like 
to quote tlie whole article, but must be satis- 
fied to make one or two exti-acts : — 

" Now tho question arises which of these meth- 
ods is wisest aud best. To this question we thiuk 
there cau be but one answer : the regular aud ap- 
pointed work of the college is first and chief. If 
the man who attains to thoroughness in this cau 
find time for work not indicated in the catalogue, he 
will undoubtedly gaiu much .by it. As much as we 
admire the " finish" of education, we believe in hav- 
ing something to finish before the varnish is put ou. 

If there is any difference in the importauoe or 
order of time, in the true process of education, 
between the questions " how to think " and " how to 



168 



BOWDOIN OBIENT. 



express thought," the former must be first. There 
can be but httle use in contriving how to say any- 
thing, until there is some prospect of having some- 
thing to say worthy of the pains." 

And, 

" We do not mean to argue that a man should 
shut himself away from the world and know nothing 
but his books, but wo do hold that every man should 
be sure that his books receive the attention which 
they deserve ; and that whatever he does, he should 
make the sternest discipline and drill of the mental 
faculties, without bias or prejudice, the first object 
of his college course." 

The last number of the Trinity Tablet is 
rather hungry-looking. Let it not take offense 
at our remark, for we think we have seen it in 
better condition, and hope we shall many times 
again. 

The Vassar Miscellany has a feminine grace 
about it that is quite irresistible. Alwa3^s 
welcome. 

" Chief cook and bottle - washer " is a 
choice phrase of the Bates Student. 

That series of articles in the Cornell Era 
on living American poets seems abruptly ter- 
minated by the " History of Stenography and 
Phonography." Bret Harte was the poet for 
dissection last week, and we suppose he ex- 
hausted the critic. 

Wouldn't the Western Collegian be apt to 
win more favor at first sight, if it only wore 
a little better dress? The type looks too 
large for the paper on which it is printed, and 
the paper too wau-visaged for the type. 

The Beloit College Monthly contains a didac- 
tic poem on Byron. Good ; but try again. 

The Tripod has been " brushing up " a lit- 
tle. Its first number of the new volume looks 
quite like a "rejuvenated" being — as to ex- 
ternals at least. It is a good thing for a col- 
lege paper to change editors now and then. 

For a school publication the High School 
Budget is a very pleasant little jpaper. 

Besides the above, we acknowledge the 



receijpt of the College Argus, Harvard Advo- 
cate, The Dartmouth, University Herald, Uni- 
versity Reporter, Cornell Times, Ashury Revieiv, 
Latvrence Collegian, Hamilton Lit., Magenta, 
Owl, Amherst Student, Volante, Pen and Plow, 
Vidette. 

Heliotype Publication 

— OF THE — 

GRAY COLLECTION 

— OF — 

ENGRAVINGS j 

Harvard College, 

—BY— 

JAMES R, OSGOOD & CO., Publishers, 

BOSTON. 

Messrs. Jauaes E. Osj^ood & Co. have the pleasure of announcing that 
by the desire of the President and Fellows of Harvard College, they are 
now publishing Heliotype reproductions of the principal art treasures of 
the " Gray Collection of Engravings," owned by Harvard College. This 
Collection is one of the most complete and perfect in the country. It con- 
tains the choicest and most costly proofs of many of the best engravers of 
the world, and is especially rich in the original works of Albert Durer, 
Rembrandt, Marc-Antonio, Lukas Van Leyden, Caracci, and others. It 
comprises the best engravings of Raphael Morghen, L:)nghi, Toschi, Ander 
loni, MuUer, Willie, Desnoyers, Mandel, Strange, Sharpe, Woollet, and 
othsr leading engravers, from the pictures of Raphael, Titian, Correggio, 
Guido, Leonardo da Vinci, Murillo and other celebrated artists. The por- 
traits by Velazquez, Van Dyck and others, and the engraved heads of dis- 
tinguished persons by Nanteuil, Edelinck, Massou and Houbraken are a 
most important feature of the collection. 

The publishers are enabled by means of the rapidity, faithfulness and 
artistic quality of the Heliotype Process, to offer beautiful reproductions 
from the choicest and most costly works of art at the lowest possible prices. 
Rare etchings or artist-proof e^ graviogs worth hundreds of dollars each, 
may be reproduced and sold at prices varying from fifty cents to two or 
three dollars, thus bringing the treasui-es of art-galleries within the reach 
of all, and affording a means of art-education hitherto unattainable. 
About 70 subjects are now ready. 

Special prices made with Colleges and Institutions of Learning. Nearly 
10,000 prints have been sold to the students of Harvard. 

"W. T. GOOBAIiE, PubUshers' Agent, 

For Bowdoin College. 



THE BRUNSWICK STEAi LAUNDRY 

is now ready to launder goods in the best manner at the most reasonable 
rates. Goods called for and delivered every day without extra charge. 

The Bath 3iS.ooms 

will be open on SATURDAY EVENINGS till 9 o'clock, and on SUNDAY 
MORNraGS tiU 11. 

E. B. PITMAN & CO. 



Vol. III. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, FEBRUARY 25, 1874. 



No. 15. 



¥ 



From the Gai 
THE RICHEST PRIN'CK. 

" Princely," saiil the Saxon mouavcb, 
"Is ni}' land in wealtli and might; 

Silver jriOTvs among its mountains. 
In the mines deep ont of sight." 

" Ijo, my land's luxurious plenty," 
Said the Elector of the Rhino, 

" Golden cornfields in its vallej-s, 
On its hills the nohle vine ! " 

" Mighty cities, cloisters wealthy," 

The Bavarian Lewis said, 
" ilalie my land to yours lull e(|ual 

In tlic treasurer it can spread." 

Tlieu up spake tlie bearded Everard, 

Wiirlemhurg's beloved heir; 
" True, my land hath humble cities, 

And its hills no silver hear; 

" Yet it holds this jewel hidden : 

That in forests ne'er so deep, 
I my head could lay down boldly 

In each subject's lap and sleep." 

Quick the Saxon Prince made answer, 
And the Princes all of them : 

" Bearded Count, you are the richest. 
Your land holds the precious gem." 



THE INTER-COLLEGIATE LITERARY 
CONVENTION. 

The delegates to arrange for the inter- 
collegiate contests met according to appoint- 
ment, at the AUj'n House, Hartford, Feb. 19. 
The meeting was called to order at 10 o'clock, 
and a call of the roll showed forty delegates 
to be present, representing the following col- 
leges: Amherst, Bowdoin, Brown, Columbia, 
Cornell, Hamilton, Lafayette, Princeton, Rut- 
gers, Syracuse University, Trinity, University 
New York City, Wesleyan, Williams, 1-4. 

Col. T. W. Higginson was also present. 



1 and by invitation of the convention delivered 
i an address that was ver3- interesting and lieart- 
ily appreciated. 

Next, reports made from the several col- 
leges showed the standing of the delegates to 
be as follows: Brown, Bowdoin, Sj-racuse, 
Columbia, Hamilton, Rutgers, Wesleyan, not 
bound by action of the convention; Amherst 
not decided to enter; Trinity approves of the 
I association, but is opposed to oratorical con- 
tests; Lafaj'ette delegates sent by faculty, but 
are not l)ound; Princeton, full power, will 
approve acts of the convention ; New York 
University, full power to act ; Cornell, ready 
to approve the doings of the convention. 
Adjourned till 2 p.m. 

At tlie afternoon session Col. Higginson 
offei'ed tlie following, wliich were adopted as 
the sense of the meeting: — 

Resolved, That it is desii-able to form an associa- 
tion of Aniericau colleges for the purpose of iuter- 
coUegiate literary competitiou. 

Mesolrecl, That this convcutiou proceed to adopt 
a provisional constitution for such an association, to 
bo submitted to the colleges here represented, and 
to such others as may be hereafter determined, and 
to take effect only on being accepted by five differ- 
ent Colleges. 

A committee of three, with Col. Higgin- 
son to act witji them, was appointed to draw 
up a constitution. 

The following is the constitution as finally 
adopted : — 

COX.STITU'riOX. 

Article I. This association shall be entitled the 
Inter-Collegiate Literary Association of the United 
States, and shall consist of such colleges as shall 
ratify this constitution. 

Article II. The object of this association shall 
be to hold such annual competitive hterary exercises 
and examinations at such times and places as the 
association itself may determine. 

Article III. The offlcersof this association sliall 
be a president, five vice presidents, a secretary, 
treasurer, and an executive committee of one from 
each college of the association. 



170 



B WD OIN OBIENT. 



Article IV. The duties of these offlcers shall be 
those usuiilly appertaining to their offices. 

Article V. These officers shall l:)e elected at each 
annual meeting of the association, and shall hold 
office until the election of their successors. 

Article VI. The annual meetings of this asso- 
ciation shall be held at the time and place of the 
annual exercises. Each college belonging to the 
■ association shall be authorized to send three (3) 
delegates. 

Article VII. Special meetings of the association 
may be called by tlae president at the request of five 
colleges belonging to the association. 

Article VIII. The standing committee appoint- 
ed by the preliminary meeting shall have charge of 
the affairs of the association until the first annual 
meeting. 

Article 15. This constitution may be amended 
at any meeting of the association by a vote of two 
thirds of the colleges represented at the said meet- 
ing. 

Article X. This constitution shall go into effect 
on being ratified by five colleges. 

Adjourned till 7 p.m. 

Mr. Clemens (Mark Twain) being present 
at the evening session, was invited to address 
the convention. He did so briefly. 

After Mr. C.'s departure, and while the 
committee on by-laws were still out preparing 
their report, the delegates turned their atten- 
tion to the singing of college songs. 

At 8 o'clock the committee reported, and 

after a long discussion the following were 

finally adopted : — 

Besolved, That this convention appoint a stand- 
ing committee of five, who shall arrange for an inter- 
collegiate contest iu oratory, to be held on , 

at , in accordance with the following rules : — 

1. Two contestants shall be choosen by each 
college belonging to the association ; if, however, 
more than eight colleges enter for competition, each 
shall be entitled to but one representative. The 
term " college " shall uot be taken as excluding 
members who have taken the degree of A.B., or any 
equivalent degree, within a year previous to the 
contest. 

2. Three awards of honor shall be made by three 
judges, who shall be chosen by the standing commit- 
tee, from men of literary and oratorical eminence, 
and who shall not be professors or officers of any 
institution represented in the contest. 

.S. Each address shall be the speaker's own pro- 
duction, and shall not exceed ten minutes in deliv- 
ery ; and in making the award the judges shall have 
regard both to matter and to manner. 

Resolved, That the standing committee shall 
arrange for a competition in essay writing in accord- 
ance with the following rules : — 

1. Three judges shall be chosen by the standing 
committee, which judges sliall propose two subjects, 



determine the length of each essay, and the time 
when the essays shall be handed in, and make au 
award for the best essay on each subject. These 
judges shall not be professors or officers of any in- 
stitution represented in the contest. 

2. Each college shall select, at its discretion, 
three representatives; if, however, the number, of 
colleges competing shall exceed eigiit, each shall be 
restricted to but two representatives. 

Resolved, That in addition to the awards of the 
judges the committee are authorized to ofl'er such 
pecuniary awards as may seem feasible. 

Resolved, That the standing committee invite the 
presiding officers of the several colleges represented 
in this association, to submit such plans as may 
seem best to them for more extended inter-collegiate 
examinations ; and that said committee be instruct- 
ed to report a plan at the next annual meeting of 
the association. 

After this a vote of thanks was tendered 
Col. Higginson, who had done so much to 
facilitate the business of the meeting. He 
was about leaving, and being asked to say a 
word as to the best place for holding the con- 
test, said he was going away with highest 
hopes for the prospect, and the only shadow 
at present was the fear that the contest may 
be held at Saratoga. 

The place of holding the first contest had 
been somewhat informally discussed at the 
afternoon session, and the general impression 
seemed to be in favor of New York. It was 
voted at the evening session that New York 
should be the place, and Jan. 7th, 1875, the 
time. 

A letter from Yale was read, saying the 
interest was so slight that it was not deemed 
best to send any delegates. The opinion is, 
we believe, that Yale will come in, as also 
Harvard, although the latter institution voted 
to the contrary. That vote, according to the 
Magenta^ did not represent the real stand of 
Harvard. 

The delegates from Bowdoin were A. G. 
Bradstreet and H. G. White. They expressed 
themselves, it will be seen, as not bound by 
any measures adopted at the convention until 
after ratification by the college. There can 
be no doubt the college approves their action 
and will ratify all that has been done. 

The Bowdoin delegates were also opposed 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



171 



to offering pecuniary prizes at the contest, 
medals or some other substitute being deemed 
better. In this we agree with them. 



SENIOR ELECTION. 

The Senior class, whose political sky was so 
suddenly and completely clouded by the trou- 
liles of last term, has again emerged into the 
light. With the more pleasure do we chron- 
icle the fact as we consider the ntter folly of 
giving up class day and class organization 
rather than correct a mistake. The class sim- 
ply made a mistake ; each division mistook the 
motives of the other, though each was acting 
in the best of faith. When the error was 
made clear there were found honorable men 
enough on both sides ready and willing to 
effect a compromise. 

One side voted for it unanimousl}', — even 
should a sacrifice be necessaiy of part of what 
it considered its strict right; a majority of the 
other side came forward in the same concilia- 
tory spirit, willing to overlook the past and 
consult only for the future good. 

A committee from each side met and made 
the nominations, which the class accepted with- 
out del)ate. The officers were selected from 
the class as a whole, no reference being had 
to the two sets previously chosen. Conse- 
quently the new " ticket " contains names 
that are found on neither of the old ones, as 
also it does names found on one and both of 
them. 

Now the thought arises that if we had 
onl}'' begun in the beginning, at the point 
Avhere we had to begin eventualljr, — namely 
at the point where we lefb off last term, when 
the first committee was appointed, — much 
labor and ill-feeling Avould have been saved for 
a better occasion. The comparative ease with 
which the committee agreed upon the nomi- 
nations, and the frankness with which they 
discussed the qualifications of the candidates, 
suggest the thought that we ought to have 



begun with a committee in the first place. 
The judgment of half a dozen men is gener- 
ally worth something, and if outside circum- 
stances are only kept outside where they 
belong, said judgment is apt to be pretty near 
right. It is no very difficult thing to choose 
officers to represent a class ; the difficulty con- 
sists in trjdng to choose them to represent 
both class and secret societies too. Consider- 
ing the whole class as candidates for offices, 
every man in it has a certain individual stand- 
ing in the opinion of his fellows, and that 
standing can neither be raised by the votes 
and influence of friends, nor lowered by the 
greatest adverse majority. Consequentlj^, it 
is sheer folly to choose men to represent the 
class at the time Avhen it wishes to appear at 
its best, and think they can do it simply Ije- 
cause they have been elected. All preferment 
should depend on qualification. This every- 
l)ody acknoAvledges ; and, as we have intimated 
above, no great difficulty is ever experienced 
in choosing, when the judgment is not tam- 
pered with by personal or other selfish consid- 
erations. We do not mean to say by this 
that the nine or ten men who would be usually 
chosen are always the best and smartest in the 
class; certainly that would be saying too 
much ; but we do mean to say that, from the 
very fact that they have been chosen impar- 
tially (whenever such strange circumstance 
happens), they are tlie nine or ten who would 
best satisfy the class. 

Then why may not the experiences of '74, 
from the beginning of the present college 
year, be a good lesson to future classes ? 

Why is not this an idea : just before elec- 
tion (not just after^i for sometimes that is too 
late) let a committee of one be appointed by 
each society, and also b}^ those who belong to 
no society, — let said committee be appointed 
to meet and make the necessary nominations. 
Certainly each would be a check to the others, 
if they were disposed to act unfairly ; and the 
great probability is that they would act fairly ; 



172 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



coming to the committee meeting with the 
idea of doing the right thing. Just try it 
once iind see how it works. 



BOWDOIN IN THE PAST. 

Tlu'ough the kindness of a friend wo are 
furnished with the following, wliich he clipi^ed 
from the Portland Advertiser of 1853, which 
in its turn had quoted it from the Cincinnati 
Commercial. We think it will interest our 
readers, not only from a statistical point of 
view, but to show the esteem in wliich our 
Alma 31 iter is held throughout the country. 
"BowDoix College, Maixe. 

" We understand that our distinguished fel- 
low citizen, Hon. Bellamj- Storer, has accepted 
an invitation to deliver an address before the 
" Peucinian Society " of Bowdoin College, on 
the occasion of the next Commencement of 
this time-honored and highly popular literary 
institution, the 5th of September. ]\[r. Storer 
is a graduate of Bowdoin College, and a mem- 
ber of the Peucinian Society. 

" We notice by the college catalogue that 
our eccentric and esteemed friend, Stephen 
Fales, Esq., was an officer in this institution 
more than fortj^ years ago. The distinguished 
divine of the New Jerusalem Cluu'ch, Rev. 
Mr. Barrett, and the no less distinguished 
Professor Cobb, of the Medical College of 
Ohio, Doctor Thomas F. Perley, Fourth street, 
and other citizens of Cincinnati, claim Old 
Bowdoin as their thrice honored Alma Hater. 
We observe, also, that our honored chief 
magistrate. President Pierce, was a graduate 
of this college, of the class of 1824, and Pro- 
fessor Stowe, who claims to be the husband 
of THE Mrs. Stowe, was his classmate. 

" Of other men, known more or less to fame, 
who have reposed under the classical bowers 
of Old Bowdoin, we note the names of the 
distinguished John P. Hale of New Hamp- 
shire ; Gov. Felch of Michigan ; Gov. Dunlap 
of Maine; Gov. Russwurm of Liberia; Bisliop 



Southgate, Prof. Longfellow, Jacob Abbott, 
and his brother John S. C. Abbott, both dis- 
tinguished authors ; President Allen of Girard 
College ; Chief Justice Tenney, William Pitt 
Fessenden, Prof. Goodwin, Prof. Packard, 
Prof. Smyth, George Evans, ll.d.. Dr. James 
jNIcKeen, Ephraim Peabody, d.d., Charles 
Stewart Daveis, ll.d., Nehemiah Cleaveland, 
Gov. Crosbjs James W. Bradbury-, U. S. Sen- 
ator from Maine ; Nathan Hale, s.t.d., Sar- 
gent S. Prentiss, and John P. B. Storer, both 
deceased ; Luther V. Bell, ll.d., John P. 
Cleaveland, d.d., Asa Redington, Seba Smith, 
Nathaniel Hawthorne, Josiah S. Little, Dr. 
Storer of Boston, &c. 

"•Bowdoin College is at Brunswick, in the 
State of Maine, one of the handsomest towns 
in New England. It lies upon the south side 
of the Androscoggin river, and but seven miles 
from the far-famed Kennebec, and is said to 
be the most health}' town in the United States, 
and we know there is no more moral people in 
all Yankee -land than the citizens of Bruns- 
wick. The Maine Liquor Law receives a firm 
and unflinching support from them. 

" By railroad, Brunswick is but six hours 
from Boston, and one hour more conveys the 
traveler to the city of Augusta (the capital 
of the State), situated on both sides the Ken- 
nebec, and to the eye one of the most beauti- 
ful cities on the no less beautiful banks of the 
Kennebec. 

"The President and Professors of Bowdoin 
College rank among the first scholars of the 
age. Rev. Leonard Woods, Jr., d.d., is the 
President, and has a very enviable reputation 
as a classical scholar and a man of genius ; 
we can avouch for his being an accomplished 
gentleman. 

" Professors Cleaveland, Goodwin, Pack- 
ard, Hitchcock, Upham, vSm3'th,and Boody, are 
well known to literary men, both in this coun- 
try and in Europe. 

" We cheerfully commend Bowdoin Col- 
lege to all our young men seeking a collegiate 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



173 



education away from home, and we advise our 
good citizens who are traveling this summer 
for their health, to extend their journey as far 
as the Androscoggin or tlie Kennebec. 

" We are pleased that Mr. Storer has ac- 
cepted the invitation to return and deliver an 
address within the walls of that beloved and 
revered institution, from which he came forth 
a I)eardless youth, and sought the West, Avhere 
he has gained much distinction ; and now after 
the lapse of nearly forty years, returns to im- 
part wisdom to the sons and, perhaps, grand- 
sons of classmates and college acquaintances." 



THE COLLEGE REGATTA. 

With the disasters of the last regatta fresh 
in memory, and with the prospect of a large 
number of contestants at the next, the Hart- 
ford Convention had an important question to 
answer in the selection of a suitable course ; 
and although its action has Ijeen the source of 
some dissatisfaction, it cannot justly be said 
that the interests of college boating have suf- 
fered at its hands. 

There seems to be a wide-spread opinion 
that the delegates were dazzled by the prom- 
ises of the Saratoga association through its 
circular and representatives, and that they 
were thereby led to a decision which on a 
second thought they never would have made. 
The press, both public and collegiate, has ex- 
pressed its pity for the credulity of the prior 
colleges who favored Saratoga, and has pre- 
dicted the downfall of college boating. It 
was evidently the sense of the convention that 
the one thing needful Avas a course on which 
twelve crews could row with equal advan- 
tage ; such a one has never been the scene of 
a regatta, and the convention foresaw that the 
future of boating depended solely upon this 
and not iipon such trivial side issues as cli- 
mate, pool-selling, etc. There has been a 
growing sentiment in favor of Saratoga for the 
past two years, and it would undoubtedly 



have been selected if no circular or advocate 
had appeared. The regatta committee have 
the whole expanse of the lake from which to 
choose a course, and it is fair to presume that 
they will select one free from all obstructions ; 
we have it from competent authority that 
plenty of such exist. 

The objection to Saratoga on moral 
grounds is well answered by Rev. JMr. Row- 
land in the colums of the Saratogian of Feb. 
6th. Ever3-bod3' knows that a regatta from 
its very nature will always attract a crew of 
sjiorting men ; and whether the race Ije pulled 
at Saratoga or on some obscure mill-pond in 
the lieart of Maine, this element will not be 
wanting. Of the thousands who have been 
attracted each year to the banks of the Con- 
necticut, but a small proportion has been com- 
posed of the friends of the crews, or of peo- 
ple connected with colleges in anj^ way what- 
ever. If the race is rowed at Saratoga, we 
ventui'e to predict a similar "make-up" of 
the spectators. 

It is but natural that those colleges who 
have always pulled within hearing of tlieir 
chapel bells should cry out at the distance of 
Saratoga. But should we sacrifice the advan- 
tages of its course for so trivial a reason ? 
Surely the objection woidd be felt at Bowdoin 
if anywhere ; she has twice sent a crew over 
two hundred miles, and is willing to double 
that distance if a fair race can thereby be 
rowed. Although situated the farthest from 
the scene of the race, Bowdoin will be more 
largely represented than ever before. We 
have heard of only one man who will forego 
the pleasures of the regatta from the fact that 
it will take place at Saratoga, and if the col- 
lege element among the spectators be de- 
creased at the regatta of '74 it will not be 
owing to the distance of Saratoga. 



Notman, of Montreal, will photograph the 
Harvard Seniors. 



174 



B WD OIN OBIENT. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



rUULISHED ETEET ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DUR- 
INU THE COLLEGIATE YEAR AT 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE, 
By tue Class of 1874. 

EDITORS. 

S. V. Cole, L. H. Kimcall, 

W. T. Goodale, D. 0. S. Lowell, 

r. W. Hawthorne, F. K. Wheeler, 

H. K. White. 

Terms — $2 00 a year in advance; single copies, 
1.5 cents. 

Address communications to Bowdoix Orient, 
Brunswicli:, Slaine. 

For sale at 7 Appleton Hall, Bowdoiu College. 
Also by J. GrifBa and B. G. Deuuison, Brunswick ; 
and A. Williams & Co., 135 Washington St., Boston. 

CONTENTS. 
Vol. in.. No. 15. — Feb. 25, 1874. 

The Richest Prince. (Poem.) 1G9 

The Inter- Collegiate Literary Convention IfiO 

Senior Election 171 

Bowdoin in the Past - 172 

College Regatta 173 

Editorial Notes 174 

'74 Class Officers 175 

Local 175 

The Telegraph Co 175 

Editors' Table 176 

Alumni Notes 177 

Godfrey Noel Gowcr on the Prance 179 

Gleanings 179 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



The Seniors are thiukiiig of asking Not- 
man, of Montreal, to come and photograph 
them. He is to be employed by the Harvard 
Seniors, and if we can secure his services here 
we may be sure of some fine pictures. 



request, his celebrated disconrse on prayer, 
which looks Prof. Tyndall's "Scientific Test of 
Prayer " right in the face. We enjoyed the 
sermon highlv. 



There is a rnmor that Dr. Hopkins is going 
to give Brunswick's literati opportunity to 
attend metaphysical lectures. At least there 
was a gathering in the south wing of the 
chapel, the other day, attended by Dr. H. 
and the town's elite, and we take this as suffi- 
cient foundation for the rumor. 



Dr. Hopkins preached, a week ago Sunday, 
in the church on the hill. He repeated, by 



We noticed, some time ago, that the Trus- 
tees of the Edward Little Institute had voted 
$10,000 toward the endowment of a profess- 
orship in Bowdoin College. It would be a 
good thing if some of the old Academies in 
the State would go and do likcAvise, — good 
for themselves, because the High School sys- 
tem is undermining all their former greatness, 
and especially good for Bowdoin and the 
State at large. 



Now that the Senior class have passed 
through so much tribulation to obtain even the 
prospect of a class-day, why not make that 
occasion a season worthy to be remembered ? 
We might have a " dance on the green," you 
know, as they do at Harvard. Waltzing in 
the moonlight — we have no doubt the moon 
would be accommodating enough to be present 
— under trees hung with Chinese lanterns, 
would be remarkably fine ! Then we must 
decorate the church for Commencement Day, 
throw open our rooms in the most hospitable 
manner, and make ourselves and friends gen- 
erally cheerful. 



The 26th Annual Convention of the Theta 
Delta Chi Fraternity, was held at the Astor 
House, New York, on February 18th and 19th. 
E. S. Hobbs was the delegate from the Bow- 
doin Chapter. 



B WD OIN ORIENT. 



175 



'74 CLASS OFFICERS. 

Marshal. 

E. A. Gray Sau Francisco, Cal. 

. President. 
T. C. Simpson Ncwburyport, Mass. 

Chaplain. 
D. 0. S. Lowell Denmark. 

Orator. 
C. M. Ferguson E. Dixmout. 

I'oet. 

F. W. Hawthorne Bath. 

Chronicler. 
W. T. Goodalc Saco. 

Vrophct. 
A. H. Powers Pittsfleld. 

Odist. 
A. L. Perry Gardiner. 

Parting Address. 
S. V. Cole Brunswick. 

Class Buy Committee. 

C. J. Palmer Portland. 

C. H. Hunter Pittsficld. 

C. E. Smith Monmouth. 

Music Committee. 
Not yet elected. 



LOCAL. 

Bowdoiu is to h.ave a Class T>Ky. 

The Medical Term commenced Fel). lOtli. 

The Prindles have gone into the Orange 
business. "Spittoon cleaning" was not a 
success iinancially. 

The Assistant Treasurer would be glad to 
have all term bills settled up as soon as possi- 
ble. Please " call at the Captain's office and 

settle." 

Two of the Brunswick " Revs " regularly 
attend Dr. Hopkins's recitation. A short time 
since four or five from Portland were present. 
They have not been called up as yet. 

On Tuesday, February 17th, a College 
Meeting was held in the chapel, for the pur- 
pose of choosing delegates to the Inter-Col- 
legiate Literary Convention held in Hartford, 
February 19th. A. G. Bradstreet and H. G. 



White were elected delegates to represent 
Bowdoin. 

A few days since the Juniors were in a 
high state of merriment, just previous to a 
German recitation. They were all singing 
" Whiskey clear," or something equally good, 
when Prof.|;^i^li-''^'alked in. "That's right, 
gentlemen," he exclaimed, " sing on ! Swans 
always smg before they die.''' 

The latest method of calling a person out 
from recitation : Some one sitting near the 
door, taps on his chair or on the wall, and 

j immediatelj" starts for the door, as if in re- 
sponse to a knock there. In a moment he 
returns and whispers to his friend, who coolly 

j takes up his hat and walks out. 

I The Staff Officers of the Bowdoin Cadets 
I liave received invitations to the Complimen- 
tary Reception to Gov. Dingley, to be given 
in City Hall, Portland, Feb. 26th. It is ten- 
dered hy the First Regiment Me. Vol. INIilitia, 
under tlie auspices of the Portland Light 
Infantry. The invitations are very hand- 
somely gotten u}). 



THE TELEGRAPH CO. 

Actuated by a desire to make our " college 
world " as much like the one outside as possi- 
ble, a few enterprising sjnrits have established 
electric communication between the North End 
of Winthrop Hall and the SoiTth End of Apple- 
ton, with various intermediate stations. At 
present there are two rival lines, although 
there are rumored attempts at consolidation. 
It is also said that when the neophytes become 
accustomed to wire-pulling, to such a degree 
that the reverberations upon the tympanum 
can be interpreted without difficulty, the line 
will be extended to the depot, thus enabling 
us to receive train reports in our rooms. The 
wires are of copper, with rubber insulators, 
and the sounders are elegant little ornaments 
manufactured by C. Williams & Co., Boston. 



176. 



BOWBOIN ORIENT. 



Their power is eight ohms (whatever that 
may be). 

The telegraph furnishes abundant chance 
for scientific experiment, proving among other 
things that " as quick as thonght " does not 
mean " as quick as lightning," for it takes 
the receivers, on an average, three-quarters of 
a minute to think up a letter. They are also 
liable to get mixed in repetitions and re-repe- 
titions, and close without an idea of what they 
started with, and visit each other personally 
to come to an understanding. We heard a 
conversation a few days since somewhat like 
the following : — 

1st Operator (calling) — P P 6P 6e 6P— 
CC. 

2d Operator — II 6 P P. 

1st Op. — H-a-v 

2d Op.— -RRRR* 

1st Op. — H-a-v-e 

2d Op. — W-r-i-t-e s-l-o-w. 

1st Op. — RRRR. 

2d Op. — S-l-o-w. 

1st Op. — H — a — V — e y — o 

2d Op. — G At H-a-v-e 

IstOp. — RRR. 

"Which he probably did, for he practiced 
the norma au7-ea, and besides, believed with 
us that patience and perseverance accomplish 

all things. 

Dot-Dash Dot-Dot. 

* Kepeat. t Go ahead. 



PAIS" AND PLEASURE. 

A Thought lay like a flower upon mine heart, 

And drew around it other thoughts like bees 

For multitude and thirst of sweetnesses — 

Whereat rejoioiug, I desired the art 

Of the Greek whistler, who to wharf and mart 

Could lure those insect- swarms from orange -trees, 

That I might hive with me such thoughts, and please 

My soul so, always. Foolish counterpart 

Of a weak man's vain wishes ! While I spoke 

The thought I called a flower, grew nettle-rough — 

The thoughts called bees, stung me to festering. 

Oh, entertain (cried Eeason, as she woke,) 

Tour best and gladdest thoughts but long enough. 

And they will all prove sad enough to sting. 

— Selected. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



Although, as the Cornell Era surmises, we 
do consider home matters of paramount impor- 
tance, we still take an interest in the coming 
tournament which will become so soon a home 
matter in the way of raising funds to send a 
crew. Our boating editor, we understand, 
Avill favor Saratoga and " back up " our dele- 
gates to the convention, although, for some 
reason or other, he has not before made pub- 
lic his opinion, and although said delegates 
were undoubtedly " dazzled " into voting as 
they did. [See 3Iage.nta, Vol. I., No. 10. 
It is really wonderful what an idea ' those 
Harvard boys have of the elements that con- 
stitute them, as compared Avith the elements 
that constitute the undergraduates of any 
other college.] 

The Chi Phi Quarterly is a new comer in 
the field of college joiu?nalism. It is published 
by the secret order of Chi Phi, and conducted 
hj one editor Avith associate editors from each 
Chapter of the Fraternity. The January 
number (Vol. 1., No. I.) makes quite a pre- 
tentious appearance, although its editorial 
department is almost Avholly devoted to the 
conventions, banquets, etc., of the Chi Phi 
Society — subjects in which outsiders take 
comparatively little mterest. The literary 
department is well filled with essays, critiques, 
poems, etc. A new feature in it as a college 
publication is its " Fraternity Department." 
This chronicles all items of interest from the 
different Fraternities in the country. Kappa 
Alpha, Ave learn, is the oldest college society^ . 
having been established in 1823. 

The College Herald, speaking of the ridic 
ulous use to Avhich Americans sometimes pul 
the much abused Avord "professor," says: — ^1 

" Perhaps some future Horace or Juvenal ma^ 
satiiize this abuse as amoug our most contempt- 
ible faults. Every man possessing a smattering of 
learning sufficient to enable him to teach a country 
school, seems to think he has a right to dub himself 
a " Professor." In most cases it is an attempt to 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



177 



secure respect for the man through the title, which 
cannot be secured through ability. 

" One of the best indications of a quack, in med- 
icine, is the pertinacity with which he sticks a 
" Prof." before his name ; it is equalled only by the 
fondness of every Congressman, of ambiguous char- 
acter, for an " Hon." 

The Southern Collegian lias been received, 
looked over, and found to be at its old tricks. 
The present number deals the coup de grace 
to any thing more that may be said against its 
taste, by flinging in our faces the de gmtibus 
non disputandum argument. Devotes half a 
column to a gentle curse on the Orient — 
tliinks our comparison of the Collegian to Don 
Quixote is happy, for, verily, it found a wind- 
mill when it came in contact with the Bow- 
noiN Orient. Altogether, the i)resent num- 
l)er is less foul in slang than its predecessor, 
l^ook out now, wind-mill, for the next gale 
that sweeps from the South ! 

The NafsHau Lit., for February, is an inter- 
esting number. The editorial department 
contains well written articles on " The College 
Studentand the Professors," " College Poetry," 
'' College Music," and " Reform in Classical 
Education." The last article advances the 
sensible idea of having a classical museum to 
be used in connection with the study of class- 
ical autliors. 

If for no other reason, wc like the Advo- 
cate because its articles are brief and to the 
point. 

The Bates Student begins the new j^ear with 
a new corps of editors; consequently we 
should be lenient in criticising the January 
number. 

The College Olio thinks of adorning its 
front page with a woodcut of the college 
buildings, and the seals of the secret societies. 
We hardly think it would improve your looks, 
friend Olio. 

An Amherst Alumnus Avrites a Senior: 
" What utter and extreme idiocy your class 
have displaj-ed." He refers, we presume, to 
the difficulty which the class had in agreeing 



upon class officers, and the consequent vote 
to have no class day ; for the student pathet- 
ically adds, 

" Would the Lord the giftie gie ns 
To see oiirsels as others see us." 

The Trinity Tablet looks somewhat im- 
proved as it enters its seventh volume. 

The AHhury llevieiv is welcomed to a place 
in our exchange list. 

We have also at hand the Yale Courant, 
Williams Vidette, Chronicle, 3fagenta, Olivet 
Olio, College Mercurt/, Western Collegian, Mad- 
isonensis. University Herald, University Record, 
College Sibyl. 

AZmiNI NOTES. 



[We earnestly request contributions for this 
department from the Alumni and friends of the 
College.] 

'52. — We clip the following from t\\Q New 
York Stockholder : — 

"Among the valuable lives exposed in the col- 
lision between the Sound steamers, Newport and 
Metis, last Friday night, was that of General Cham- 
berlain, President of Bowdoin College, and formerly 
Governor of the State of Maine. Ho was returning 
home after attending the annual meeting of the Bow- 
doin Alumni, in this city. The General is a young 
man, in view of the high honors which have come to 
him, having graduated (at Bowdoin) in 1852, but he 
was old enough to command the division of our 
army which surrounding the remnant of the defiant 
confederacy still battling under the gallant Lee, 
forced the surrender of the Appomattox." 

'60. — David Hale recently died at Bridg- 
ton. Me. After a short academic course of 
preparation, he entered Bowdoin College in 
1856, and, working his way with energy and 
success, he graduated in 1860. He commencd 
the study of law in the office of Gen. Samuel 
Fessenden of Portland, and afterward contin- 
ued his studies with H. P. Deane, Esq., of the 
same city. In 1862 he was admitted to the 
bar, and commenced the practice of law in 
his native town. 



178 



BOWBOIN ORIENT. 



'63. — George M. Pease recently died at 
Bridgton, Me. We learn the few particulars 
below from the News: — 

He prepared for college at tlie North Bridgton 
Academy, of which institution he was at one time 
an assistant teacher. He graduated at Bowdoin in 
1863, and studied medicine with his fiither, then 
practicing in this village. Previous to receiving his 
diploma, he enlisted in Twitchell's Battery, and 
after returning from the war and completing his 
college course, he commenced the practice of his 
chosen profession at Saccarappa, afterwards at Bridg- 
ton and at Harrison. A year or more ago he 
received a commission as Assistant Surgeon, U. S. 
A., and was stationed at Cheyenne Agency, Dakotah, 
and afterwards at Fort Snelling, Minn. Here he 
contracted a disease known as laryngitis, which, 
becoming chronic, terminated in consumption. 

'68. — George M. Bodge has been elected 
Principal of Westbrook Seminar3^ 



The annual dinner of the Bostoir Associa- 
tion of Bowdoin College Alumni was held at 
the Parker House last week. There were 
about fifty gentlemen present, and the occa- 
sion was one of the most pleasant that has 
been enjoyed by the alumni in Boston. The 
college was represented by President Cliam- 
berlain and Professor Packard, and there were 
two delegates from the Portland Association. 
Previous to entering the dining parlors, the 
company met for the choice of officers, and 
elected the old board, which is constituted as 
follows : — 

President, John C. Dodge; Vice-President, 
Chai-les M. Cumston ; Secretary Daniel C. Linscott ; 
Executive Committee, John C. Dodge, the Eev. E. 
B. Wehb, Cyrus Woodman, T. S. Harlow, the Rev. 
George Gannett, James R. Osgood, and Lorenzo 
. Marrett. 

Professor Carmichael was elected honorary 
member. 

The doors were then thrown open and the 
seats at the table were assigned. The Eev. 
Dr. Webb invoked the blessing. The dinner 
was abundant and well served, and was evi- 
dently enjoyed. 



At a quarter of nine o'clock the president 
called the company to order, and after a few 
pleasant introductory remarks, congratulated 
the members of the association on the fact 
that they had reached the sixth year of their 
organization. The object for which tliey had 
formed themselves together was being rapidly 
accomplished in the awakening of a deep 
interest in the college, especially among its 
alumni and friends. He proposed as a senti- 
ment " Alma Mater." 

To this President Cliamberlain responded. 
He first returned the lieartfelt aclcnowledg- 
ments of the college for the obligations she 
was under to the association. It was waken- 
ing up such an interest in the college as had 
never been wakened before. Following the 
steps of the Boston alumni otliers Jiad caught 
the spirit. In New York they had caught the 
ring of the key-note and were acting up to 
it. The college felt it also, and lier heart beat 
back responsive. Sire gained new strength 
and hope for the future. He felt full of 
encouragement to think that the college was 
to be put upon a firm and sure basis, so that 
she could hold her own. He closed by return- 
ing most hearty thanks for the courtesies ex- 
tended to the institution, and to assure tlie 
association that its spirit would live and grow 
and bring forth fi'uit a hundred-fold. 

Professor Packard said that he was in New 
York last week, and he hardly felt at home 
there. But in Boston and Massachusetts he 
felt differently'. It was by the legislature of 
this State that the college was fostered, and 
from which it received its name. The first 
teachers were Massachusetts men, with one 
exception, and the books and methods of 
instruction were copied after Harvard. He 
thought, however, that the college had fully 
repaid the State by sending back such men as 
Rufus Anderson, Longfellow, Hawthorne and 
Chandler. He saw, also, brother Osgood at 
the table, who probably had more to do with 
books than any other alumnus. [Laughter.] 



BOWBOIN ORIENT. 



179 



He thought tlae life of the college was never 
more vigorous. It was said she was in the 
ruts, but he, in his long acquaintance, had 
never observed it. She furnished good in- 
struction through able professors, and as evi- 
dence he called attention to the fact that one 
of them had been called to Princeton and 
another to Cambridge. The college had from 
the first been forced to struggle for assistance. 
,He learned to love her when there were but 
two brick buildings and the old wooden chapel, 
when the grounds were a mere desert without 
one shade tree. "Was it strange, then, that 
now, as he viewed its great progress, and 
especially when he called to mind the faces 
Avhicli, during many years, had gone in and 
out before him, and the dear associations, he 
loved her as he did his life ? [Applause.] 



We ciit the following from the Savannah 
News of Nov. 26 — Alas, poor Noel ! 

A REFRESniXG AFFAIR. — GODFUEr NOEL GOWER 
ON THE PRANCE. 

Wo visited the Masonic Temple last evening for 
the purpose of heariug tlie celebrated graduate of 
innumerable colleges and universities, Godfrey Noel 
Gowcr, distiuguisli himself in the dramatic read- 
ing line. The very modest circular which the dis- 
tinguished elocutionist put out, alluding gracefully 
to himself as a " host, in fact a perfect team," led us 
to harbor the hope that we should bo treated to a 
very recherche literary entertainment, and a reporter 
of the News was therefore deputized to attend the 
" Seance Declamatoire," and ad\-ise the readers of 
the Nctcs of what transi)ired. Upon entering the 
splendid hall of the Masonic Temple, the reporter 
was somewhat awed by witnessing the immense 
audience composed of fifteen or more nervous citi- 
zens, with hero and there a representative of 
the fair sex, but being accustomed to surprises, he 
meekly tendered an "open sesame" to the colored 
doorkeeper, and rambled to the nearest chair. 

The distinguished reader had just seized hold of 
"Seven Ages" by Shakspeare, which he rendered 
in such a thrilling manner as to start the perspira- 
tion from every pore of the reporter's body, and 
caused him to sigh for " the days that were past." 
Ho closed his weary eyes for a moment aud imagined 
that he had suddenly been transported to an insti- 
tution in Milledgeville, when he opened them, and 
discovered the modest Gower capering over the 
stage, with distended eye balls, wildly gesticulating, 
and ever and anon runuing his bony fingers through 
his auburn locks. Finally the " Seven Ages" were 
passed through, and with a sigh of relief the 



reporter settled himself to hear the " Yarn of the 
Nancy Bell." If the Seven Ages disturbed his 
equilibrium, it was nothing to that fearful "yarn"; 
the terrible details, frightfully delivered, sent a cold 
chill over him, and revived the wish in his trembling 
heart that he "were a boy again," shooting mar- 
bles, aud not the reporter of a daily paper, listening 
to a " perfect team." But such must be borne, and 
knowing that the morrow was Thanksgiving Day, 
he bore it. Next followed the " Raven," aud it is 
really a wonder that the outraged spirit of the bril- 
liant Poe did not appear upon the scene, and com- 
mand the prancing Gower "nevermore" to attempt 
that task. 

The fifteen members of the audience cast weary 
glances at one another, aud there was a look upon 
the faces of the ladies that plainly spoke their desire 
to reach the pleasures of " home, sweet home," soon 
as possible. "Jack Horner," new rhymes strung on 
an old tune, was very good, and the modest Gower 
in some measure, by the introduction of this piece, 
calmed the excited audience of fifteen, although 
one or two frantic capers occasioned a little rest- 
lessness. "The Ride from Ghent to Aix" was per- 
fectly fearful, and though, as a general thing, the 
Reporter is partial to rides, ho trusts fortune may 
preserve him from taking another with the eminent 
Gower. 

"Singing for the Million" concluded this brilliant 
seance, and as the distinguished elocutionist pranced 
ott' the stage through the private door, the audience 
of fifteen, hesitating whether to weep or laugh, 
capered off uimbly, aud blessed their stars the seance 
was ended. 

G. N. G., equally felicitous, snatched up his 
valise, it is understood, and cantered for the Charles- 
ton depot, and thus fades from our vision the 
most brilliant literary luminary of the period. 



GLEANINGS. 

A high -stand Alumnus preached three 
sermons in the country, to a congregation of 
seven old maids, on infant baptism. 

According to the latest decision of the 
Faculty, no student is permitted to go on with 
his class, who has any condition on his hands. 
A particular few find fault with this, but the 
principle seems to be a good one. — Vidette. 

Scene — Senior breakfast table, Christmas 
morning. New Comer — "Mr. C, what did 
you get last night for Christmas?" Mr. C. 
(gruffly)—" Got a good sleep." N. C— " Mr. 
T., what did you get this morning?" Mr. T. 
— " Got up." N. C— " Mr. S., what did you 
get in your stocking?" Mr. S. — "Got my 
foot in it." Mordent ornnes. Novieius quiescit. 
— Yale Courant. 



180 



BOWDOIJSr ORIENT. 



The Seniors are remarkably interested in 
Geology. The other clay the professor called 
them np five pages beyond the extent of their 
lesson ; yet, strange to say, no one objected to 
Such a procedure, neither did any one fail to 
recite. What can be the morals of such a 
class ? — Amherst Student. 

A Senior, stuffing for examinations, has 
developed the etliics of Sunday work in a way 
to render further elucidation unnecessary. He 
reasons tliat if the liOrd justifies a man for 
trying to heljD the ass from the pit on the Sab- 
bath day, much more would he justify the ass 
for trying to get out himself. — Chronicle. 

Who started that story, about the poor 
student who has had no fire in his room this 
term ? They say lie has never had a quilt on 
his bed, but wraps his ears about him and lies 
down to pleasant dreams. He never had a 
broom until he froze his ears, and even now 
has no coal-liod or ash-pan. — Madisonensis. 

It Avas one of our treacherous, slippery 
days that a gallant, foppish law student was 
smoothly sailing along under double-reefed 
shirt-front, when he caught sight of a pretty 
little ci-aft of his acquaintance, coming down 
on his port quarter. Tlie law prepared to sa- 
lute the fragile bark, who, by the way, was 
bearing down upon him with a vast sj^read of 
sail. Just as he was in the act of saluting he 
missed stays, and in a moment more he was 
on his beam ends ; his sjiars flew out and 
caught in the schooner's shrouds. Both came 
to and prepared to repel boarders, but after a 
short parley, both were seen bearing away to 
the leeward, wing and wing. — Chronicle. 

Sandwich Islands, Dec. 20iJi, 1873. 
Bear Editors of The Advocate : — 

I send the following, hoping that it may 
be printed if it is not considered disrespectful 
to the memory of Atom. At a concert held 
here several evenings ago, on noticing among 
the musicians, just before thej^ begun to play, 
a flute-player, who bore a striking resemblance 
to General Grant, and who was sitting pensive 
looking in the background, I remarked that 
he was probably thinking of finance and paper 
currency. " Yes," replied my more specific 
friend, " he is going to inflate." This was re- 
garded an excellent joke here. I hope it may 
not seem a barbarous one to my refined Eastern 
friends. Yours, &c., A Subscriber. 



Heliotype Publication 

—OF THE— 

GRAY COLLECTION 

OF — 

ENGRAVINGS 

Harvard College, 

JAMES R. OSGOOD & CO., Publishers, 

BOSTON. 

Messra. James R. Osgood & Co. have the pleasui'e of announcing that 
by the desire of the President and Fellows of Harvard College, they are 
now publishing Heliotype reproductions of the principal art treasui*es of 
the " Gray Collection of Engravings," owned by Harvard College. This 
Collection is one of the most complete and perfect in the country. It con- 
tains the choicest and most costly proofs of many of the best engravers of 
the world, and is especially rich in the original works of Albert Durer, 
Rembrandt, Marc-Antonio, Lukas Van Leyden, Caracci, and others. It 
comijrises the best engravings of Raphael Morghen, Longhi, Toschi, Ander 
loni, Muller, 'Willie, Desnoyers, Mandel, Strange, Sharpe, 'Woollet, and 
other leading engravers, from the pictures of Raphael, Titian, Con-eggio, 
Gnido, Leonardo da Vinci, Murillo and other celebrated artists. The por- 
traits by Velazquez, Van Dyck and others, and the engraved heads of dis- 
tinguished persons by Nanteuil, Edelinck, Masson and Houbraken are a 
most important feature of the collection. 

The publishers are enabled by means of the rapidity, faithfulness and 
artistic quality of the Heliotype Process, to offer beautiful reproductioos 
from the choicest and most costly works of art at the lowest possible prices. 
Rare etchings or artist-proof engravings worth hundreds of dollars each, 
may be reproduced and sold at pricas varying from fifty cents to two cr 
three dollars, thus bringing the treasures of art-galleries within the reach 
of all, and affording a means of art-education hitherto unattainable. 
About 70 subjects are now ready. 

Special prices made with Colleges and Institutions of Learning. Neai'ly 
10,000 prints have been sold to the students of Harvard. 

W. T. GOODAIiE, PuTbHsliers' Agent, 

For Bowdoin College. 



Furnislied at the Lowest Eates, 

—BY— 

2Z and 26 Appleton HaU. 



THE BRUNSWICK STEAM LAUNDRY 

is now ready to launder goods in the best manner at the most reasonable 
rates. Goods called for and delivered every day without extra charge. 

The Bath. K-ooms 

will be open on SATURDAY EVENINGS till 9 o'clock, and on SUNDAY 
MORNINGS tiU 11. 

E. B. PUTNAM & CO. 



Vol. III. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MARCH 11, 1874. 



No. 16. 



INTER-COLLEGIATE LITERARY CON- 
TESTS. 

The public interest in the inter-collegiate 
regattas of the past few years, is doubtless the 
occasion, in no small degree, of the rise of 
this new project. This, at least, is certain ; 
that many sincere champions of intellectual 
culture have risen up to pi-otest against the 
absorbing interest shown in these annual exhi- 
bitions of muscle and wind, and the conse- 
quent neglect of the higher purposes for which 
colleges exist. Accordingly, it is proposed to 
establish a similar order of contests upon an 
intellectual rather than a physical basis, in 
order to correct the evils apjireliended from 
the I'egattas, and to arouse a corresponding 
enthusiasm over intellectual attainment and 
superiority. From the purpose, therefore, 
wliich underlies this plan, no intelligent man 
can withhold his S3'mpathj'. But the impor- 
tance of the end which is sought demands a 
careful consideration of the proposed means, 
and opens a subject the full chscussion of 
which would require much time and space. 
It is intended in this article, however, to refer 
briefly to but one phase of the subject, but a 
phase which must be regarded as most impor- 
tant. 

Nothing, therefore, will be said at present 
concerning the likelihood of success in the 
attempt to stimulate intellectual activity and 
culture by the same methods that seem so 
potent in the sphere of physical exercises ; 
nothing concerning the probability of securing 
satisfactory decisions in contests, the nature 
of which precludes visible boundaries and sen- 
sible effects ; nothing concerning the kind and 
degree of interest which may reasonably be 
expected from the public in the progress and 



results of such contests. For the present, it 
may be granted, in resjiect of all these points, 
tbat the promoters of this plan have no serious 
occasion for misgivings. But the chief ques- 
tion is still untouched. Is this scheme, grant- 
ing that it may be entirel}'' successful as a trial 
or contest, reallj- in the interest of intellectual 
culture and true education ? 

Doubtless it will be admitted that in form- 
ing the intellectual, as in forming the moral, 
character, great care must be exercised in 
presenting the proper motives and in assign- 
ing the true ends of conduct. It is a question- 
able proceeding to train a child to honesty upon 
the maxim that " Honesty is the best polic3\" 
However important that truth may be, it does 
not furnish a good motive. An honesty built 
upon that foundation would be neither the 
purest nor the most trustworthy. If " policy " 
1)C made its criterion and justification, it is 
not difficult to conceive of circumstances 
which would prove a trial too severe for its 
survival. Indeed, it may be said that, in 
moral and intellectual culture alike, an unwor- 
thy or insufficient motive is often directly op- 
posed to true success. The man who built 
his bouse upon the sand had better not have 
built at all. 

Now is the principle of competition a good 
one to embrace in our schemes for stimulating 
and developing the intellectual character and 
culture of our colleges and of the country? 
Does it furnish a good motive ? Is it in accord 
with the true aim of intellectual pursuits? 
These questions should be fairly and fully 
considered, although they can be scarcely 
more than suggested in this place. As regards 
the true aim of mental culture. Lord Bacon, 
in the " Advancement of Learning," writes as 



182 



BOWDOm ORIENT. 



follows : " But the greatest error is the mis- 
taking or misplacing of the last or farthest 
end of knowledge; — for men have entered 
into a desire of learning and knowledge, some- 
times upon a natural curiosity and inquisitive 
appetite ; sometimes for ornament and rejiu- 
tation ; and sometimes to enable them to vic- 
tory of wit and contradiction ; and most times 
for lucre and profession ; — and seldom sin- 
cerely to give a true account of these gifts of 
reason to the benefit and use of men ; as if 
there were sought in knowledge a tower of 
state for a proud mind to raise itself upon, or 
a fort or commanding ground for strife and 
contention ; or a shop for profit or sale — and 
not a rich storehouse for the glory of the 
Creator, and the relief of men's estate." 

Few, probabl}^ would dissent from the 
position so justly taken, and it would seem as 
if the very statement of the case is sufficient 
evidence that the stimulus of competition 
does not lead to the true end of intellectual 
culture. It is scarcely reasonable to employ, 
as a stimulus, a principle which is inconsistent 
with the end at which we aim. The incentive 
and the object must be in harmony with each 
other. Methods and results will inevitably 
correspond in character. " Men do not gather 
grapes of thorns." The late Lord Lytton, 
writing upon this general subject, saj^s : " If 
the cause be holy, do not weigh it in the 
scales of the market ; if its objects be peace- 
ful, do not seek to arm it with the weapons of 
strife." Now there is nothing in common be- 
tween strife and the pursuit of learning, ex- 
cept when conflict is necessary in the interest 
of truth. The mission of Wisdom is too high 
to be occupied with contention that has no 
worthier object than a victor's crown, and 
they who would participate in that mission 
ought not to be much engaged in petty con- 
tests for championship. 

To all this it will be objected that the 
principle of competition has already been 
recognized and adopted in the conduct of col- 



leges, and is thought to subserve a useful 
purpose. But the statement may be confi- 
dently made that most thoughtful men regarc 
the system of marks and prizes as a necessary 
evil. Whether or not it is necessary, need not ' 
here be considered, as the object of this arti- 
cle is neither to arraign nor to defend the 
marking system. The question is as to the 
wisdom of enlarging the influence and opera- 
tion of a principle which, to say the least, 
is of doubtful propriety. 

In regard to this question, attention is 
called, in closing, to the remarks of Prof. 
Seelye, of the University of Cambridge, the 
author of " Ecce Homo." In deprecating 
the prominence and influence of the system 
of examinations at the English Universities, 
he says : — 

" Surely nothing is more important at a Univers- 
ity than to keep up the dignity of learning. Noth- 
ing surely is more indispensable than an intellec- 
tual tone, a sense of the value of knowledge, a 
respect for ideas and for culture, a scholarly and 
scientific enthusiasm, or what Wordsworth calls 
a strong book-mindedness. Now the spirit of com- 
petition, when too far indulged, is distinctly antago- 
nistic to all this. In the case of boys, I suppose it 
must be called in, because boys have not yet felt the 
higher motive to study. But it vulgarizes a mind 
capable of this higher motive, to apply to it the 
lower motive in overwhelming force. Students at 
the University are no longer boys. They differ from 
boys principally in this, that they are old enough to 
form an opinion of the value of their studies. . . 
All the influences of the place and of the teachers 
should lead the student to form a high conception of 
success in life. They should accustom him to des- 
pise mere getting on and surpassing rivals, in com- 
parison with internal progress in enlightenment, and 
they should teach him to desire slow and permanent 
results rather than immediate and glittering ones. 
Now I say that intense competition vulgarizes, be- 
cause, instead of having this tendency, it has a 
tendency precisely contrary. Instead of enlarging 
the range of the student's anticipations it narrows 
them. 

" There are some who think that the principle 
of competition should not be introduced into educa- 
tion at all, and that there are better ways of teach- 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



183 



ing industry even to children. Tliis may be an 
extreme view ; but I am sure that competition is a 
dangerous principle, and one the worising of which 
ought to be most jealously watched. It becomes 
more dangerous the older the pupil is, and therefore 
it is most dangerous in Universities." 



THE FOUR YEARS' FIGHT OX OUR 
CAMPUS MARTIUS. 

Eds. Orient, — A friend of mine failing 
to prepare his lesson the other day, took what 
is commonly called a " dead " at recitation. 
The Professor, so it happened, required him 
to " make up." On returning from this 
second ordeal he said he had just passed a 
post-mortem examination, and handed me the 
following, which I suppose there is no impro- 
priety in calling a "posthumous " production. 
As such it is less liable to criticism, while I 
may be allowed to add a few notes to eluci- 
date some of the points. 
I. 

[In which he sentimentalizes.] 
The piues to.=s tlieir old beads iu strange unrest; 
The stars of heaven are glittering all iu tune ; 
Against the sky's blue curtain bard is pressed 
The cold white shoulder of the lonely moon. 
A silver shawl of sunlight o'er her thrown — 
She lost a gold one in the sea, poor thing ! 
And through the mazes of you branching trees 
She rose just like a bird with silver wing. 

[In which he suddenly recovers himself.] 
But ou the moon I must not waste my art ; 
Though she is lovely, sitting with her stars, 
My theme, less "lunatic," is quite as good : 
I sing of arms aud horrid things of Mars, 
Of those brave youths who suffered much while they 
Might bear their gods from schools preparatory 
To college walls, the Lotium of their hopes — 
And suffered much iu deeds of college glory. 

[On gaining admittance.] 

"Fall in!" the voice went through the laud; " the voice 

Aud bended bow," for aught I kuow, were sent ; 

At least, some fell while trying to fall in, 

And then, if beaux, they went home sadly bent. 

But wo whose stomachs were of sterner stuff, 

Aud could suck nurture from Greek roots at sight, — 

"Whose bones were marrowed with a Latin fire, — 

Us they bid stay and arm us for the fight. 



[In which His Sulphuric Majesty first 
appears.] 

How we did figbt! Some were im-j)a(7-ed at once; 
Some met the verj- devil ; without fail 
'Twas he, for he had horns and that was night ; 
The day, we thought, would sure reveal a tail (tale). 
For " we were a gallant company," 
As Byrou hath it; " sailing" where we could, 
And where we couldn't, " riding." Ah ! methiuks 
Such days will never be again, nor should. 

[On the use of certain domestic animals 
often found in camp.] 
Thj' book, it was thy chief and stable friend : 
If not thy friend, it was thy stable though ; 
"Who has not seen the long ears sticking out 
Aud heard the neighiug of the pou}' ! 
On other fields cold " brazen lips '' do kiss 
Whole armies into sleep with their rude breath ; 
Here " brazen lips" (wo call it cheek for short) 
Sometimes save men, ignoble men, from " death." 

[On a time.] 
A Maid * we burned aud buried ou a time — 
Peace to her ashes ! buried in the darlc ; 
(I know not if her name might Joau bo. 
But seems to mo 'twas very much like Arc.) 
For " we were a gallant company," 
As Byron hath it ; sailing where we could, 
Aud when wo couldn't, " riding." Ah ! metbinks 
Such days will never be again, nor should. 

[In which the strife ends and the tale 
thereof.] 

To that have hoard the " iron heel " of war 
Stamp loudly on the earth with fearful sound ; 
ye that have seen the conqueror's flaming car 
Roll in at suuset from the smoky bound 
Of a great battle, while his legions strive 
To cram their luugs into his willing ear, 
And iu his eye the sight of bauuers torn, — 
To need not listen more ; small news is here. 

Here come the " infantry" t a noble throng, — 
They that have foot-sore trod the marches all, — 
Chiefest aud first ; a handful of brave men. 
Or less than that, save that the hand be small. 
They come iu slowly for the last " parade " ; 
And lo! a gonfalon all lettered o'er 
Flaunts in their faces from the western sky 
The written words, " Such days shall be no more." 

N'ow come the " cavalry " on prancing steeds, 

A happy crowd ; there's splendor in their eye ; 

And all their nags are posted on the side 

"With "M}' horse for a kingdom ! who will buy?" 

" Liddell aud Soott " is saddle unto one. 

Unto another, "Andrews " ; while the lore 



184 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Of Aristotle helmets sis. But ah ! 

All catch the words, " Such days shall be no more." 

(Let medics not thinlf they 're iuclnded here ; 

They come to get their "shoepskius" true 'tis said ; 

iSTot knowing they might have them at half cost 

"\Fould they but flay themselves aud not the dead.)* 

So here we stand upon our last parade, 

Till " break ranks" runs forever down the Hue ; 

"When banners will be folded all away — 

And then to thy lot, brother, I to mine. 

For so King Arthur's Table was dissolved. 

As to the sea old Audroscoggin winds, 

"We too shall plunge out and be quickly lost 

" Amoug new men, strange faces, other minds." 

Forgive my rhymes, though they be crude aud strange. 

Get but my meaning aud I do not fail ; 

There's little time, when " moving in the tents," 

For work fair, smooth, and finished to a nail. 

D. 

* Miss Lytics, a precocious mathematician, whose fate 
was similar to that of the French heroine. A warning to 
those who seek after a sine. 

t Presumably those who had not money enough to buy 
a " horse," nor cheek enough to borrow. 

t The author was going to take excepti<ms, but the 
Muse halted and made such terrible faces that he con- 
cluded she didn't approve of any change. Her aversion to 
the practiced, and consequeutly to those who study for it, 
is somewhat noted. . 



IMITATION IN LITERATURE. 

In looking over a somewhat antiquated 
law report, not long since, Ave were much 
interested by the report of a very learned, 
very abstruse, and yqvj lengthy discussion of 
the rights of literary property. The discus- 
sion took a philosophic turn, aud the dispu- 
tants argued and wrangled in a maimer that 
would have done credit to metaphysicians, 
and which, had they been philosophers instead 
of lawyers, would have immortalized their 
dispute. 

The question which they were exercised 
upon was whether the style and ideas of an 
author are tangible things, or whether they 
can be property. How, argued they, can they 
be property, since it is obviously not possible 
for possession to be taken, or any act of occu- 
pancy made, on mere ideas? 



Nothing, said they, can be property unless 
it have bodily substance ; the air and the light, 
to which they likened an author's ideas, are 
common to all. They also compared the ideas 
of an author, while he retained them in his 
own possession, to birds in a cage; so long as 
he chooses to keep them, none but he has a 
right to let them fly ; but the moment he frees 
them he loses all claim to them, and it can be 
no violation of rights for any one to appro- 
priate them. Strangel}^ as this reasoning may 
sound, is there not after all some truth in it? 
Are not the greater portion of the ideas of 
the literary world common property? Have 
not the birds been all caged; and the greater 
part of them so many times that it would be 
difficult or impossible to tell who let them fly 
first? Of the multitude of books which are 
continually issuing from the press, how many 
contain an original idea, make known a new 
truth, or in any way enlarge the domain of 
knowledge? Not one in a thousand. For 
every original thinker there are multitudes of 
imitators. The popular writers are not those 
who put forth new ideas, but rather those who 
are skilled in adapting and expressing the 
thoughts of other men. 

Original ideas are apt to be regarded with 
suspicion at first. It has certainly been the 
fortune of very many of those original works 
which have left their impress on all literature, 
not to be appreciated until they had ceased to 
be new. A large portion of the books of our 
time are simple commentaries upon other 
books, the sole aim of the author being, not 
to tell us anything new, but to set forth the 
old in some new light. The highest literary 
ability is employed in criticising books already 
written, in writing commentaries on them, or 
presenting them in some new form. How 
many has the single collection of Shakespeare's 
plays thus employed. We have still glossa- 
ries, commentaries, criticisms, and reviews of j 
Shakespeare's works as if they had been writ- • 
ten only j^esterday. Nor is this all ; in reading j 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



185 



a book, how often do we come upon a bor- 
rowed thought, a familiar phrase, or an appro- 
priated sentiment. 

If authors could secure a cop3''right only 
in what ^yas strictly their own, if all borrowed 
ideas were excluded, the number of books 
entitled to copyright would be vastly dimin- 
ished. 



A SOXXET. 
After long years of wandering I came 

Once more to the cathedral — but 'twas night, 

Deep night, save by the altar one dim light 
Beat back the darkness with its flickering flame. 
The solemn place! I knew it was the same, 

Bnt somehow I did strive with my vain sight 

To make the new seem old, the wrong seem right, 
And of things I saw not tried to call the name. 
Oh, Memory! like yon candle flame thou art 

To beat the darkness back' a little way ; 
And this cathedral is but my own heart 

Adown whoso solemn aisles my thoughts will stray 
"With forms unseen, but loved. I wait apart 

To see them all at breaking of the daj'. 



From boyhood we ever regarded ourselves 
as original thinkers. Now, by "original" we 
do not mean brilliant — simply peculiar, that's 
all. Sometimes, indeed, we imagined we were 
on the track of a valuable idea, though it 
always managed to elude us. But that didn't 
discourage us. We expected that ; but we 
believed that when we had farther explored 
the intricacies of thought we should overtake 
those phantoms, bring hidden mysteries to 
light, and make some important announce- 
ments to the world. In short, we dreamed of 
literary fame. To this end we treasured up 
scores of mental images, to be depicted in the 
dim hereafter, when we should have attained 
the happy faculty of perspicuity in writing. 
Ah, those were halcyon days ! when we con- 
templated our future greatness in secret. But 
stern Reality came stalking by and overturned 



our beautiful Ideal, and it lies shattered at 
our feet. 

It happened in this wise. While waiting 
for a reasonable time to make our debut, we 
took a pleasure trip through the field of imagi- 
native literature. A " pleasure trip " did we 
say? Yes; begun with pleasure but ended 
with pain. For in that vast area what did we 
find? Not a ghost of an idea that ever 
occurred to lis but we found there incarnate, 
in full dress. No idiosyncrasy, that we thought 
peculiarly our own, but it had been the dis- 
tinguishing (not distinguished) characteristic 
of somebody else. No individual feeling but 
was common to half a dozen others. So per- 
ished our youthful imaginations. For if we 
should ever have an idea worth mentioning 
we feel sure we should find it somewhere all 
written out befoi'ehand, and, for our pains, 
we should get contempt for stealing pictures 
really the products of our own mind, and rid- 
icule for altering the perspective, if they were 
not facsimiles of the presumed original. 

So we find that all our proposed thunder 
has been stolen beforehand, and we are natu- 
rally somewhat electrified at the discovery. 
It is useless to have vain desires, but we can't 
help wishing we had been the first man, for 
then we might have obtained some credit for 
the bona fide creations of our OAvn brain ; but 
now our cause is hopeless. We have aban- 
doned the field of literature, and given up our 
long cherished idea of adding anything to the 
world of imagination ; for we find that " the 
thing that hath been it is that which shall be ; 
and that which is done is that which shall be 
done ; and there is no new thing under the 
Sim." 

Probably we shall be accused of plagiar- 
ism in writing even this article, but it matters 
little to us. If not, we shall conclude that 
we have uttered the only original idea that we 
could possiblj^ conceive, while the accusation 
would but prove the truth of our argument. 

SiNESPE. 



188 



BOWBOm ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



PUBLISHED EVEEY ALTEEXATB WEDNESDAY DUE- 
ING- THE COLLEGIATE YEAE AT 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE, 
By the Class of 1874. 

EDITORS. 

S. V. Cole, L. H. Kimball, 

W. T. GOODALE, D. 0. S. Lowell, 

F. W. Hawthoene, r. K. Wheelee, 

H. K. White. 

Teems — $2 00 a year in advance; single copies, 
15 cents. 

Address communicatious to Bowdoin Oeiext, 
Brunswick, Maine. 

For sale at 7 Appleton Hall, Bowdoiu College. 
Also by J. Griffin and B. G. Deunison, Brunswick ; 
and A. Williams & Co., 135 Washington St., Boston. 



CONTENTS. 
Vol. III., No. 15. — Maech 11, 1874. 

Inter - Collegiate Literary Contests 181 

The Four Years' Fight on our Campus Martins. . 183 

Imitation in Literature 184 

Sonnet 185 

Editorial Notes 186 

Bowdoin in 1852 187 

Local 189 

Editors' Table 190 

Alumni Notes 191 

Gleanings 191 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



Lamsou of Portland, is to be engaged as 
photographer to the Senior Class. 



The long sermons we sometimes hear, re- 
mind us of what an English jurist said when 
asked how long a sermon ought to be : 
" Twenty minutes," he replied, " with a lean- 
ing to the side of mercy." 



Our readers have doubtless received, by 
this time, the sad intelligence that Rev. Dr. 



Balkam of Lewiston, was killed by a fall 
from his horse. He was Professor of Logic 
and Mental Philosophy in Bates College, and 
his loss will be severely felt. 



The new generation of Bowdoin students 
excel in " cheek," whatever may be said of 
their other accomplishments. A Freshman 
recently entered an assembly composed of 
members of the Senior class, and being in- 
formed, on inquiry, that the meeting was a 
class affair, coolly seated himself, and appeared 
mightily interested in the proceedings. As 
he did not seem to take any hints that were 
thrown out, the House immediately resolved 
itself into a Committee of the Whole for the 
purpose of ejecting the offender. Resistance 
was now in order, and yet, the last we saw of 
the Freshman he was moving away in the 
care of six stout Seniors, his body in a per- 
pendicular to the plane of the door. 



To show that our opinion on a certain 
matter is not alone, we quote the following 
from the Vblante, the well edited paper of 
Chicago University : — 

" A jjropos of the last sentence of the above, we 
notice that, consequent upon the Bowdoin Oeient 
having remarked that 'we claim to be men, and 
claim our right to be treated as men,' an outside 
editor undertakes to refute this preposterous idea, 
by showing that the same Orient contains accounts 
of 'Bibles being stolen from chapel, the oiling of 
blackboards, the ducking of Freshmen with slop,' 
&c. The Oeient, however, very sensibly shows the 
writer what a donkey he is, by calling his attention 
to the fact that in a college of several hundred stu- 
dents it is not fair to attribute to all a character 
belonging only to half a dozen. The students as a 
body may be men even though there are among 
them a, half dozen dead beats." 



It was long ago apparent that some limit 
should be placed to the indiscriminate con- 
ferring of post-graduate degrees, in which 
nearly all colleges so recklessly indulge. At 
the present time A.M. and Ph.D. are almost 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



187 



meaningless, unless the individual worth of 
the bearer is known, and D.D. and LL.D. 
sometimes have but little signification. 

Regular courses leading to these degrees, 
and rigid examinations at their close, are the 
remedies proposed by some. But this is a 
cumbrous method and cannot be applied to all 
cases, perhaps to but few, and, of course, not 
at all to the higher degrees. 

We would like to see either more wisdom 
by college authorities in this matter, or some 
uniform regulation under which the conferring 
of all degrees may be judiciously determined. 



Amherst still remains firm in her determin- 
ation not to row at Saratoga, and evident^ 
there is no prospect of her yielding at all. 

Whatever may be said of her position at 
the Convention, or the strength of the reasons 
which influenced her action there, there can 
be little doubt, we think, of the unreasonable- 
ness of her present attitude. 

That the question of the removal of the 
course to Saratoga was a debatable one ; that 
there were strong reasons on moral and other 
grounds against the change, no one will deny. 
But it was only a matter of theory after all, 
a question of judgment as to probability. If 
any great moral principle were concerned, 
none could withhold their admiration for this 
determined attitude in the face of such un- 
broken opposition. 

But while it is a mere balancing of oppo- 
site probabilities, a question of untried theo- 
ries, it would be much more dignified, and 
fully as honorable, for Amherst to fall in with 
the decision of the majoritj^, and wait for 
practical experience to prove that her judg- 
ment was better than that of nearly all the 
other colleges combined. 



The Inter-Collegiate Literary Convention 
certainly made as wise and auspicious a begin- 
ning as could reasonably be expected. The 
number of the delegates, and the earnestness 



they manifested, seem to justify the belief that 
the enterprise is to meet with the success it 
deserves. 

It is to be hoped that Harvard and Yale 
will not hold themselves aloof permanently. 
It may be that the}" are somewhat jealous of 
the leadership of colleges younger and less 
important. 

The rules adopted are, undoubtedlj^ in the 
main, wise ; time wLU suggest additions and 
modifications. We see no reason why in the 
competition in essay-writing an award should 
be made to each subject assigned. In this 
way the least deserving competitor might, by 
luckily choosing the subject which all others 
neglected, carry off the prize to the exclusion 
of his less fortunate rivals. 

It would, too, give a less mercenary air to 
the competition, if, instead of pecuniary prizes, 
medals or some other honorary token were 
offered instead. The selection of New York 
as the place will not be so favorable to colleges 
from our localitv. The New York colleges 
predominated, however, in the convention, as 
they undoubtedl}^ will in the contest. We 
hope Bowdoin will ratify the constitution, and 
be represented in both of the contests. 



BOWDOIN IN 1852. 



Reminiscences of Bowdoin, we presume, 
are alwaj's welcome to the great majoritj' of 
our readers. We clip the following from the 
3Iorning Star of September 22, 1852 : — 

" BowDoix College. 

" We had the pleasure of attending the late 
Commencement at Brunswick, an occasion 
more than ordinarj^, by reason of the " half- 
century jubilee " of the Alumni. This, in 
connection with the usual Commencement 
exercises, brought together crowds of people ; 
and not a little was added to the rush, b}"- the 
announcement that the Hon. John P. Hale, 
and the Hon. Franklin Pierce, graduates of 



188 



B WD OIN ORIENT. 



Bowdoin, were to walk again, for a day or 
two, among the ' whispering pines ' of tlieir 
Alma Mater. Two beautiful flags had been 
thrown, side by side, across tlie main street of 
tlie village ; the one, bearing the inscription 
of ' Hale and Julian,' and the other, ' Pierce 
and King ' ; and there was an anxiety on the 
part of some to see the two ' New Hampshire 
Boys' together. The friends of Hale, cer- 
tainly, would not have been ashamed of their 
man, or of any comparisons that might have 
been made. But all are doomed to disappoint- 
ment. Pierce was present, Hale was not. 
General Pierce Avas treated with great re- 
spect. 

" There is among the students of Bowdoin 
a good share of Anti- Slavery sentiment. A 
Freedom Club has been organized, and its 
members, by discussions among themselves, 
and by correspondence Avith distinguished 
abolitionists, are not only exerting a healthful 
influence upon their fellow students, but are 
girding themselves for the great conflict of 
after life. 

" The graduating class is small — sixteen — 
but several of them are stern anti -slavery. 
Two Free Soilers had parts, and spoke finely 

— May of Winthrop, and Stone of Salem, 
Mass. May is the son of Seth Maj^ Esq., 
one of the ablest men at the Maine bar, and 
for a long period a faithful and tried friend of 
the slave. Here slavery is yet to receive a 
terrible blow. Anti -slavery parents are in- 
stilling the true principles of liberty into the 
minds of their children. 

"The ' Commencement dinner' was eaten 
in a pavilion erected on the College green. 
Judge Shepley presided, and beside him were 
seated Gov. Hubbard, and other men of note. 
There were some five or six hundred at 
the table — men of all ages and professions 

— a large proportion hoary -headed ministers. 
After partaking of the rich repast. President 
Woods ' deaconed off ' the 78th Psalm, which 
was sung by hundreds of voices : — 



" ' Let children hear the mighty deeds 

Which God performed of old, 
"Whicli in our younger years T^e sa\r, 

And which our fathers told.' 

" The speaking which followed was on the 
whole very good. Rev. John S. C. Abbott 
spoke of the beauties of Brunswick in spite of 
its pine trees and sand-banks. He thought it 
either the garden of Eden, or oxight to have 
been. 

" A reverend gentleman, whose name we 
did not get, spoke of the neglect which he 
received while a student at Brunswick. He 
said there had been, fault on the part of the 
faculty in not looking more after the moral 
training of the students. James Bell, Esq., 
of Gilford, N. H., agreed with the last speaker; 
but thought the neglect was not intentional. 
It was too much so in all our institutions. 

" Rev. Mr. Trask of Massachusetts, spoke 
of the future prosperity of the College — that 
it consisted not so much in Gothic structures 
and splendid buildings, as in its strict adhe- 
rence to moral principle — to the ' Higher 
Law,' which, said Mr. T., was venerated by 
the founders and early friends of the College. 

" The inauguration discourse of Professor 
Hitchcock, who takes the place of Professor 
Stowe, was an able performance. Mr. H. 
avowed himself ' more the disciple of Augus- 
tine than Pelagius ; and Calvin, than Armin- 
ius ; ' and yet, as the teacher of a public insti- 
tution, he should respect the opinions of all 
the members of his classes. 

" We have only one wish for Bowdoin 
College — that God would give it increased 
prosperity, and make it a blessing to the 
church and the world." 



The appointments for the Senior and 
Junior Exhibition, at the end of the term, 
are as follows: Seniors: Salutatory — S. V. 
Cole. Orations — M. W. Davis, C. H. Hun- 
ter, L. H. Kimball, D. O. S. Lowell, H. W. 
Philbrook, A. H. Powers, G. B. Wheeler. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



189 



LOCAL. 

Spring overcoats are aj)pearing. 

The Sophs will soon sport caues. 

The class picture question is still unde- 
ciclecl. 

The large invoice of "stogies" has ruined 
tlie cigar trade, 

H. G. White, '74, is at home, quite ill with 
the rheumatic fever. 

The last Orient revived the remembrance 
of the ahnost forgotten Noel-Hope. 

The Freshmen are making up a class crew. 
They have material of the lirst quality. 

The Juniors are having discussions on Free 
Trade and Protection, in connection with their 
study of Political Economy. 

The Captains of Go's A, G, and D, were 
present at the Military Reception to Gov. 
Diiigley, in Portland, Feb. 27th. 

Prof. Garmichael is exhibiting some very 
interesting and successful experiments before 
the Seniors and the Medical Classes. 

The new Medical Class is large and un- 
commonly promising. Among the strange 
faces we recognize that of J. M. Boothby, '73. 

A "metaphysical subject" has been given 
to each member of the Senior Class, on which 
they are to write essays to be read before the 
class. 

A Senior sent for some sample cigars, and 
received a box C.O.D. to the amount of fifty 
dollars. He has since given up smoking, as 
being ratlier an expensive habit. 

We hear that "yaggers" have actually 
been snowbaUing Seniors on the streets. One 
of the urchins received an immediate punish- 
ment for his audacity, as he deserved. 

The Junior Class has elected the follow- 
ing as editors of the Okient for the ensuing 



year: H. G. Briggs, S. M. Carter, E. H. Hall, 
F. B. Osgood, F. A. Powers, G. R. Swasey, 
F. R. Upton. 

Spittoon cleaners, candy venders, and 
orange dealers, are getting altogether too 
numerous. Nine calls from the above men- 
tioned gentry, all in one hour, are annoying 
to say the least, and ensure the next comer 
anything but a pleasant reception. • 

W. T. Goodale and H. H. Emery were on 
to Harvard last Aveek, and saw Notman, or 
his representative there, in reference to class 
pictures. He said they were so busy witli the 
Harvard and Dartmouth pictures they would 
hardly have time to take any more. Notman 
will probably not be the man after all. 

Thursdaj^, Feb. 2Tth, the day set apart for 
prayer for colleges, was duly observed at Bow- 
doin. All recitations were adjourned. There 
was a prayer-meeting in the morning, and a 
service in the chapel in the forenoon, at which 
Dr. Hopkins preached a \e\-j fine discourse. 
There was also a union prayer-meeting in the 
evening. 

Prof. White has procured some new chairs 
for the Cleaveland Recitation Room ; also some 
tables, on which the Juniors are to pursue their 
Zocilogical studies. The room also contains a 
chart of the Geological Ages and Periods, 
very creditably executed b}^ Orestes Pierce, 
'75. Hon. A. D. Lockwood, the late Treas- 
urer of the College, has kindly given a dona- 
tion to this department. 

To illustrate the transmission of sound 
through solids Prof. C. sent a "medic" to the 
Dissecting Room for the purpose of striking 
an iron pipe which connected with the Chem- 
ical Room. The medic, somewhat confused, 
rushed into the Anatomical Room instead, 
where Prof. G. was hearing a class, and com- 
menced thumping away on an old lead pipe, 
much to the consternation of the Prof, and 
the amusement of the class. 



190 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



Judging from the Advocate we should say 
that the average Harvard student is not ex- 
actly a creature sui generis, but that he tries 
very hard to become so. When the call for 
the recent literary convention was received at 
Harvard, the editor of the Advocate, or some 
one very much like him, takes it up with a 
dainty touch, looks it over, and, lost in 
amazement to find he has not been consulted 
in the matter, exclaims, " I do not under- 
stand ; no, certainly I do not iinderstand." 
Away he flies to his telegraphic instrument, 
and sends the following message to Mr. 
Hubbell, the first signer of the call : — 

" Convention call not understood. For general 
discussion of project, or only for colleges favoring °? " 

Presently he received this reply : — 

" Williams, Feh. 12, 1874. 
"Dear Sir, — Your despatch is just received, 
and iu answer I would say that the design of the 
Convention is to set iu practical operation the pro- 
ject proposed iu the circular, and to discuss the 
best method for establishing the institution this 
year. The question of practicability, it would seem 
to me, is hmited to the separate CoUegcs. Hoping 
to see Harvard represented, I am very truly yours. 
" Charles B. Hubbell." 

Hereupon the Harvard delegates who had 
been elected by the same meeting which passed 
a resolve against the proposed contest, imme- 
diately resign ; and the next Advocate says : 
" In view of the fact that the Convention is 
" illiberal enough to exclude all discussion on 
" the advisability of the proposed contest, we 
" heartily endorse the action of the meeting. 
" Such a limitation seems to us a tacit admis- 
" sion of the weakness of their plan." Per- 
haps the Advocate knows the subject has been 
discussed for a year or more ; and perhaps 
Harvard wanted to sit in the " reserved seats" 
of the convention, where she could eye-glass 
what the little boys were doing, and at last 
swoop down upon it all with a tremendous 
veto. It seems the Harvard delegates were 



only elected for the purpose of opposing every 
scheme of literary contest, for how otherwise 
could they be expected to vote when their 
college passed the resolve above alluded to ? 
Because the convention call was not worded, 
" Please come and vote against our plan," the 
Advocate thinks it very " illiberal " ! 

The Bates Student, for February, comes to 
us draped in mourning for the death of its 
Senior Editor, Mr. Arthur S. Whitehouse. 
We sincerely sympathize with the Student in 
the loss it has sustained. 

The Chronicle contains some remarks on 
the " College Sunday." We quote ; — 

" It is perhaps to be regretted that attendance 
upon divine service is not compulsory with us ; for 
by making it voluntary we are deprived of the sat- 
isfaction of displaying our natural and inborn 
antagonism to all forcing processes ; just as a little 
boy will combat all attempts to force him to do 
something which the next moment he will probably 
do of his own inclination." 

The following is to the point, although by 
saying so we do not advocate staying away 
from church. 

" The average young man will go to church if he 
cau be interested, and stay away if he can not. Col- 
lege students are said to be the most critical of all 
beings, and an audience composed of them the 
hardest to satisfy. The occupants of our pulpits 
are without doubt good, sincere men, and earnest 
workers ; but such qualifications are generally the 
last which a young man will consider. At any rate 
we do not like to think that our absenting ourselves 
from church service goes to prove that we have 
more worldliness than others, or that we lack iu 
reverence." 

The Magenta is always a most welcome 
exchange. We appreciate the candor with 
which it criticises the Orient, but only wish 
it had not selected the particular number it 
did, as representative of Bowdoin's interest 
in journalism. 

Will they never be done coming ? Every 
now and then a stranger publication from 



BOWJDOIN ORIJSNT. 



191 



some high school Avill peep its head into our 
box, and find its wa}^ to our table, with the 
request that we " please exchange." O cer- 
tainly; we are very hospitable to all comers, 
and will entertain them as best we can. When 
all the high schools have settled down to a 
"paper basis," what next? Why, of course 
the nurseries will become literary, and we 
shall have periodicals with such names as " The 
Bib," " The Pinafoi-e," " Mamma's Darling," 
" The Baby's Shoe," etc. 

Never mind ; it will not be in our da}-, 
and we welcome The High School, that has 
come all the way from Omaha, Nebraska. 

We have also on our table Old and Neiv, 
Rhode Island Schoolmaster, Tripod, Ycde Cou- 
rant, Lafayette Monthly, Vblante, Cornell Era, 
Pen and Plow, Amherst Student, Hamilton 
Literary Monthly, Williams Vidette, College 
Argus. 



When wriliug an article for the press. 
Whether prose or verso, just try 

To utter your thoughts in the fewest words. 
And let them be crisp and dry. 

And when it is finished, and you suppose 
It is done exactly brown. 

Just look it over again, and then 

Boil it down ! 

For editors do not like to print 

An article lazily long ; 
And the general reader does not care 

For a couple of yards of song. 
So gather your wits for the smallest space. 

If you'd win the autlior's crown, 
And every time you write, my friend. 

Boil it down ! 



ALmmi NOTES. 



In soiue respects, what the class of '25 is 
to Bowdoin that of '29 is to Harvard. Among 
the names found in this latter class are those 
of G. T. Bigelow, Rev. W. H. Channing, Rev. 
James Freeman Clarke, F. B. Crowninshield, 
Benj. Robbins Curtis, Oliver Wendell Holmes, 
Benjamin Pierce, and Samuel Francis Smith, 
author of " My country, 'tis of thee." 



[We earnestly request contributions for this 
department from the Ahimni and friends of the 
College.] 

'68. — John S. Derby was recently elected 
Judge of the Municipal Court in Saco, Me. 

'71. — W. P. Melcher, a.b., late Professor 
of German Literature in Pike Seminary, New 
York, has been appointed Instructor of Ger- 
man in the University of Minnesota. 

'71. — Edgar F. Da^ds is Professor of 
Languages and Higher Mathematics in the 
DeGarmo Institute, Rhinebeck, New York. 



GLEANINGS. 

A Kiel professor of philosophy has, accord- 
ing to the German papers, given a ball to cel- 
ebrate the two thousand three hundred and 
second anniversary of the birth of Plato. 

The late Professor Goldstucker has left his 
manuscript for a Sanskrit Dictionary to the 
India office, with the condition that it is not 
to be published till 1020, because of his dis- 
like to contemporarj' criticism. 

The Governor of Wyoming winds up 
his Thanksgiving proclamation in this stj-le: 
" Give thanks unto the Lord, for His mercy 
endureth forever. In witness whereof I have 
set my hand and caused the great seal of the 
Territory to be affixed," etc. — University Re- 
porter. 

A Durfee Senior came home late the other 
night; it was very Avindy, and he found con- 
siderable trouble in unlocking his door. On 
the following morning he confided to his chum 
that there was such a strong draft through the 
key-hole that he could not get his key in for 
some time ; and jei he calls himself a temper- 
ance man. — Courant. 

Scene 1. Soph's room, Sunday evening, 
before church ; Soph in deep meditation ; his 
chum snoozing on the lounge — " I say, chum, 
can't we hit upon some plan of living better 
Christians ? " Sleepy Soph (yawning) — " Well 
I don't know, I have come to one conclusion : 



192 



BOWDOm ORIENT. 



we must either give up religion or General 
Geometry." Scene 2. Recitation, Monday 
morning, in General Geometry. Both Sophs 
fizzle. Nothing like fixedness of purpose. 

1st Soph, (wisely) — "I heard a tree bark 
over yonder." 2d Soph, (not to be outdone) 
— " That's nothing, I heard it holler." 1st 
Soph. — " Well, if 3'ou had staj^ed long enough 
you would have seen it leave." 2d Soph. — 
"Did it take its trunk along ? " 1st Soph. — 
"No; it left that for board." — Philomathean. 

I make no pretentions tew literature, I pay 
no homage tew elegant sentances, I had rather 
be the father ov one genuine original truth, i 
don't care if it iz az hump-backed az a drum- 
udary, than tew be author ov a whole volume 
ov glittering cadences, gotten up for winter- 
green eating school-girls to nibble at. — Wit- 
tenherger. 

Dr. Hopkins — " What does j'our enjo}^- 
ment of a witty man depend on?" Student 
— " It is in proportion to his wit." Dr. H. — 
" Suppose he is a good man ." Student — "In 
proportion to his goodness." Dr. H. — " Well, 
suppose he knows a great deal ? " Student — 
" In proportion to his nose." (Class howls). — 
Williams Review. 

The address of welcome, by Hon. R. M. 
Benjamin, to the teachers of Illinois, at their 
late meeting in Bloomington, was a scholarly, 
powerful and elaborate effort. We have not 
room for the entire address, but we gladly 
give place to the following eloquent passage : 
"Sir" (bowing to the President), "Chicago 
may boast of her commerce and divorces ; 
Peoria may take pride in her lake and her 
distilleries ; Jacksonville may glory in her 
feeble-minded and strong-minded institutions ; 
Evanston may take pride in her garrulous 
grainiies ; Joliet may felicitate herself upon her 
University and its inmates clad in the skin of 
the zebra ; but if Bloomington is not the ed- 
ucational centre of Illinois, then give me lib- 
erty, or give me death! " — Chicago Teacher. 

Get Insured so as to BE Insured ! ! 

The Merchants and Equitable Life 
Insurance Companies. 

A. G. BRADSTBEET, Agent, No. 8, M. H. 

Also Agent for APPLETON'S NEW AMERICAN CYCLOPEDIA. 



HelEOtype Publication 

—OF THE— 

GRAY COLLECTION 

—OF — 

ENGRAVINGS 

Harvard College, 

JAMES R. OSGOOD & CO., Publishers,! 

BOSTON. 

Messrs. James R. Osgood & Co. have the pleasure of announcing that 
by the desire of the President and Fellows of Harvard College, they £ 
now publishing Heliotype reproductions of the principal ai't treasures of 
the " Gray Collection of Engravings," owned by Harvai'd College. This 
Collection is one of the most complete and perfect in the country. It c 
tains the choicest and most costly proofs of many of the best engravers of 
the world, and is especially rich in the origiual works of Albert Bure 
Rembrandt, Marc-Antonio, Lukas Van Leyden, Caracci, and others, 
comprises the best engravings of Raphael Morghen, Longhi, Toschi, Ander 
loni, MuUer, "Willie, Desnoyers, Mandel, Strange, Sharpe, 'Woollet, audi 
other leading engravers, from the pictures of Raphael, Titian, CorreggioS 
Guido, Lsonardo da Vinci, Murillo and other celebrated artists. The por-^ 
traits by Velazquez, Tan Dyck and others, and the engi'aved heads of dis- , 
tingulshed persons by Nanteuil, Edelinck, Masson and Houbraken are a 
most important feature of the collection. 

The publishers are enabled by means of the rapidity, faithfulness and 
artistic quality of the Heliotype Process, to offer beautiful reproductiona 
from the choicest and most costly works of art at the lowest possible prices. 
Rare etchings or artist-proof engravings worth hundreds cf dollars each, 
may be reproduced and sold at prices varying from fifty cents to two or 
three dollars, thus bringing the treasures of art-galleries within the reach 
of all, and affording a means of art-education hitherto unattainable. 
About 70 subjects are now ready. 

Special prices made with Colleges and Institutions of Lsarning. Nearlyj 
10,000 prints have been sold to the students of Harvard. 

'W. T. GOODAIiE, FnbUsliers' Agent, 

For Bowdoin College^ 



BOOKS! BOOKS! BOOKS! 

BOOISIS OF .A-XjILi I2:i3SriDSj 

Furnislied at the Lowest Kates, 

—BY— 

22 and 26 Appleton Hall. 



THE BRUNSWICK STEAM LAUNDRYl 

is now ready to launder goods in the best manner at the most reasonably 
rates. Goods called for and delivered every day without extra charge. 

the: B.A.-TII F&OOIVES 

will be open on SATURDAY EVENINGS till 9 o'clock, and on SUNDAY! 
MORNINGS tiU 11. 

E. B. PUTNAM & CO. 



Vol. III. 



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, MARCH 25, 1874. 



No. 17. 



OUR HEROES. 

They dwell alone upon the heights, ye say, 
Aud in the upper rooms; — while day hy day 
Toa meet tbem in your rounds through mart and field. 
Unrecognized, unknown. We shall be healed, 
Te cry, if we hut touch their garment's hem, 
And straightway strive to grasp one wrought iu gold. 
Remembering not the seamless garb of old, 
Of Him who walked with men. 

To hear of victories, of acts sublime ^ 

■Wrought by heroic souls, of olden time, 

That touch your hearts with flame. " For such grand deed 

We give our prai^-e, at best as littlo meed, 

heroes, brave and true," aud while ye cry, 

Mete unto these but scanty dole of praise, 

"Who have made pleasant all the weary ways ; 

The faithful few, who with us live and die. 

Te bring your lilies, dewy, IVesh and sweet, 
And your best gifts, to lay them at the feet 
Of one the world hath crowned, while ye, full fiiin 
To see such little glory, seek in vain 
A. King, unmindful of the star whose heavenly ray 
"Would guide your steps. Brothers, must these things bo? 
Te go to crown j-our saints; look up aud see 
An angel in the way. 

Learn that defeat is ofttimes victory ; 
Our heroes, they who labor patiently 
"With hope of no rewai'd, no golden meed 
Of recompense for many a generous deed 
Prompted by loving hearts. In the clear light 
Of that new day ye shall behold them stand 
Highest in Heaven, and nearest God's right hand. 
The garment that He siive hath been kept white. 



A WRONG PRINCIPLE. 

During our j)ractical experience with col- 
lege customs, we have become convinced that 
a wrong principle altogether has become es- 



tablished in this and probably in most other 
institutions of a similar nature, in determin- 
ing the conditions of advancement and gradu- 
ation. We have, usually, at the close of eacli 
term, and alwaj's at the end of the year, an 
examination which j^rofesses to be the crucial 
test of fitness for advancement. But every 
one knows that it is not ; that these examina- 
tions are merely nominal ; that it is almost 
impossible for a student to acquit himself so 
poorly as to be dropped. This, then, is not 
tlie test. We have, too, a record of rank 
kept throughout the course ; but it can not be 
possible that this is used, for men of low rank 
meet the annual crises without faltering in 
the least. 

The only absolute requirement of which 
we know, whether it be an essential condition 
or not, is attendance upon the recitations and 
lectures. Of course, it is altogether impossi- 
ble to make this requirement cover every 
term and every day. The absence of students 
for days, or even weeks, is absolutel}' necessar3^ 
Often men desire to teach during a part of the 
course, and thus must be absent generall}^ a 
third, often a half, of the whole year. Accord- 
ingly, leaves of absence are devised, and the 
requirement is thus robbed of its force. Ac- 
cording to our system the recitations lost in 
this wa}^ must be made up, but in most cases 
the examinations here are simply farcical, in 
no sense adequate substitutes for the lost reci- 
tations. 

The fact is, the strictest attendance on the 
required exercises does not imply good schol- 
arship, or any adequate knowledge of the 
branches pursued. The best scholars are often 
those who are compelled to be absent the 
most. But as long as attendance or its nom- 



194 



BOWBOm ORIENT. 



inal equivalent is the only thing required, we 
are to suppose this the only condition of 
advancement. 

We do not know but that it may be a 
necessary requirement. We are hardly pre- 
pared as yet to advocate voluntary attend- 
ance upon recitations, although we confess 
our opinions have been di-ifting in that direc- 
tion for some time. 

But there is something far more important 
than this, something which should receive 
much more attention, while the other may be 
to a great extent slighted. Examinations 
should be made more rigid and critical ; the 
supreme test should be here. The advance- 
ment is understood to be indicative of certain 
attainments ; it should Ukewise be conditioned 
on those attainments. If examinations are 
not to be the test, the rank-book may be, but 
it should be something dependent on a certain 
proficiency in the studies pursued. And we 
think it altogether probable that if scholarship 
were something required as well as desired, 
there would be little need of compulsory at- 
tendance upon recitation. Students would 
see that in order to attain the high standard 
thus required, regular attendance would be 
absolutely necessary. If not from desire of 
knowledge for its own sake, yet through fear 
of being dropped, these prolonged absences 
and this reckless " cutting" would have to be 
dispensed with. The truth is, many students 
care more for diploma and degree than for the 
attainments to wliich they certify. At any 
rate, though classes might be thinned, and the 
aggregate of term bills decreased, through the 
adoption of this method, a higher grade of 
students, we think, would go forth from our 
college every year. 



EAELY AMERICAN COLLEGES. 

Prof. Moses Coit Tyler delivered an ad- 
dress on Tuesday evening, March 3d, before the 
New York Historical Society, on " The Early 



Colleges and the College Builders of Ameri- 
ca." He said that before the Revolution there 
were nine established colleges in this country, 
aU of which are still in existence. Harvard 
stands first, it having been built in 1636. The 
second college was built in Virginia in 1692, 
and called William and Mary. Yale College 
was built in 1699. The fourth was built in 
New Jersey in 1746, and is now known as 
Princeton College. In 1754, King's College 
in New York City, was erected. On the top 
of the budding was placed a huge iron crown, 
which was torn down after the Revolution, 
when the building was rechristened Columbia 
College. In 1755, the University of Penn- 
sylvania was erected in Philadelphia. Next 
came Rhode Island College, built in 1764, and 
which forty years later was renamed Brown 
University. Later, the Rev. Eleazer Wheel- 
ock opened a school for Indian children in 
Lebanon, Conn., which in after years led to 
the erection of Dartmouth College, in New 
Hampshire. The ninth college was founded in 
1770, in New Jersey, and was called Queen's 
College, and this name was changed in after' 
years to Rutgers College. 

The lecturer then described the action of 
the Pilgrims in 1636, only eight years after 
their landing on the continent, in beginning 
work on Harvard College. He said that al- 
most as soon as they were safely landed they 
began to think of the future and make appro- 
priations for the work. Their motives were] 
to provide for themselves a succession of 
learned ministers and rulers from among 
themselves ; they desired to have leaders of ' 
society and politics, and they knew the value 
of a good ediication. 

He next described the way of building 
Harvard College, and gave a list of the lega- 
cies, subscriptions, etc., from the colonists, 
such as money, cattle, furniture, etc., and the 
gift of ^800 and a library of 300 volumes 
from the Rev. John Harvard, after whom the 
college was named. — College Oourant. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



195 



SPEIXG. 

sajipbire-eyed ! we see thee when 
Thy eyes at uight shine through the laoe 
Of cloud thou drawest o'er thy face, 
As bashful to be seen of men. 

Earth's bonds are broken, and the flow 

Of rivers souuds in her dull ear; 

And at the whisper thou art here, 

Her heart beats upward through the snow. 

sapphire -e.ved ! we see again 
The flowers thou givest to the earth. 
And at the praises of their worth 
Thou hlushcst through the April rain. 

How is thy eye -light earthward sped! 
Sweet Twilight beareth on her arm 
A mantling elinid, blue, edged to charm, 
Shot through and through with gold sun -thread. 

Sing, Nymphs ! sing, Naiads, whose dark locks 
Swim on the waves with gold sea- weed; 
Blow, shepherds, on the river's reed. 
That charms to joy the listening flocks. 

And where is Pan, that great god Pan, 
"Who loves Arcadia's shady hills '? 
He drinks at all the crystal rills, 
And beareth good to sheep and man. 

■Wo love thee. Goddess of the Spring ! 
Hark! from the grottoes far away. 
Through shiuing air and blinding spray, 
"We hear the wave-bells lightly ring. 



COLLEGE DEGREES. 

We broached the subject of conferring 
degrees, in our last issue, not because it was 
a new idea that had just occurred to us, but 
because papers and people are all the time 
scolding upon the subject, and we wished to 
share in the protest. There has got to be such 
a multiplicity of colleges in our land, and all 
of them manifest such an eagerness in the 
work of making Doctors and Masters, that it 
has got to be a question of practical import- 
ance, how to put a limit to the indiscriminate 
abuse of a system good enough in itself. If 
we go on as we are going now, it will soon be 
more of a distinction to have no degree at all 



than to be honored with all the titles the world 
of letters can give. If the whole thing is of 
no practical importance whatever, and is 
merely a farce for pleasing men's vanity, the 
sooner it is got rid of the better ; but if it is 
to be made to mean anj^thing at all, it should 
not be made to mean everything. 

No doubt the greatest misuse of the system 
is in connection with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts, and here, if anywhere, the reform 
should begin ; but for the present we have 
reference only to post-graduate degrees. We 
don't imagine we have solved the problem, 
but we give our thoughts for what they are 
worth. We are going upon the hypothesis 
that the system does amount to something, 
although for ourselves we have doubts about 
that. 

We premise, first of all, that a man who 
merits one of the degrees which our colleges 
are in the habit of conferring, should, first, have 
the talents or the culture to wliich it professes 
to certify ; and, second, be desirous of obtain- 
ing it. 

We would emphasize the talents and the 
culture, because we suppose it is evident and 
acknowledged universall}'', that men of no 
special talents and no special culture, should 
be altogether debarred from these honors, and 
because we believe that, if this emphasis is 
properly carried into practice, a very foolish 
custom will be done away with. 

We suppose that each of these many titles 
has some special and appropriate meaning, 
that is, belongs to men distinguished in some 
specialty of science or letters. For example, 
Doctor of Divinity, we presume, means a man 
of deep piety and sound theological learning, 
and Doctor of Science (we believe there is 
such a degiee), a man of broad scientific 
attainments. But, of late, our colleges have 
got into the habit of giving these degrees 
significant of culture and scholarly attain- 
ments, not to scholars but to celebrities. 

Any man who blows the glittering trumpet 



196 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



of fame, whether distinguished in letters, 
politics, Avar, or in navigating the Arctic 
Ocean, must have a degree, and every Com- 
mencement season the search for big names 
has got to be so eager that not a few small 
ones are thus honored. If nothing else were 
available, we imagine some distinguished slayer 
of his fellow creatures, would be styled Doc- 
tor of Medicine, and some wil}^ politician of 
the Ben. B. stamp. Doctor of Divinity. (By 
the way, has Ben. got his LL.D. yet ? If not, 
some college has a magnificent opportunity.) 
The custom is so absurd and meaningless that 
we do not see how serious men can tolerate it. 
For, really, it would be just as sensible to 
appoint Longfellow Major General, as to con- 
fer upon Phil. Sheridan the degree of Doctor 
of Laws, as was done by some college a few 
years since. To take a more notorious exam- 
ple, Harvard, two years ago, conferred this 
same degree upon President Grant. Now 
what did this mean ? That President Grant 
was a man of extensive culture in philosoph}^ 
and letters ? Not at all. Simply Grant was 
a famous man and Harvard, perhaps, thought 
to steal a little of his fame by connecting their 
names in this way. Who ever saw the name 
written Ulysses S. Grant, ll.d. ? What does 
he care for the honor ? 

It is no injustice to shut out all this class 
of men from these honors ; they have their 
titles and their dignities. Leave to scholarly 
and literar}^ men the honors of scholarship and 
letters. 

We hope we are not called upon in this 
connection to speak of the mercenary custom of 
conferring degrees upon wealthy men merely 
to win their favor. We do not refer particu- 
larly in this to Bates College in — is it Leiv- 
iston, Me., friend Student? 

We said that men to deserve the post- 
graduate degrees should desire them, and we 
said it not only because we think it an essen- 
tial condition to the conferring of the honors 
any way, but especially in view of the plan 



or fragment of a plan that occurred to lis. 
Besides, we believe in many instances it is 
more the college that desires the honor of 
conferring, than the man the honor conferred. 

Then if merit and desire are the conditions, 
why not adojDt a plan by which both may be 
IDroved by a single act? If men have a desire 
for these honors, would it be discreditable for 
them to shoAV that desire and apply for the 
honors ? We think not ; no more than for them, 
if they have the ability or culture, to show that. 
Why not have competitors for the title of 
Doctor of Laws, as well as for that of Presi- 
dent of the United States ? 

In what shall the competition consist? 
We suggest, in the presentation of discourses 
or essays on literary, scientific, or theological 
subjects, according to the degree desired. 

Is there anything in the idea absurd, or 
that, carried into practice, would be discredit- 
able to the applicants, or derogatory to their 
learning or ability ? We can not see that there 
is. However, the idea occurred to us, and, 
unless some one takes the trouble to enlighten 
us, we shall suppose it a plausible one. 



With the present number of the Orient 
our editorial labor ceases. In making the 
announcement we are not free from those 
feelings which naturally follow the comple- 
tion of an}^ labor, be it small or great. 

At first, there is a feeling of relief, and 
the great beauty there is in it the editorial 
board most fully appreciate. Perhaps it is 
sufficient to repaj' them for all they have 
undergone in contending with adverse circum- 
stances. 

To conduct even the smallest publication 
is not play, it is work ; and when the time of 
work comes round very regularly, whether 
the workers can or not, a disagreeable element 
is frequently experienced that looks ver^^ much 
like drudger}^ 

Among the class of persons who much 



BOWBOm ORIENT. 



197 



deserve our sympathj^ college editors are 
neither last nor least. Like other students 
they are subject to all the duties of college 
life ; no special favor is ever shown them by 
the exaction of study. As in the case of 
others, whatever they do outside the regular 
course, is so much extra ; thay must do it be- 
tween whiles. They must work on the paper 
between whiles, and their efforts are not 
always criticised in the most friendly spirit. 

During the past year we have not received 
that support from the students which we have 
had a riglit to expect. We say a light, be- 
cause we think it the duty of others, besides 
those specially desiguated, to contribute arti- 
cles to the college paper. Its success depends 
upon such support. Otherwise it is not a 
representative of the literary culture of the 
college, — not of the students, because they 
do not write for it ; not of the editors, because 
they are compelled to do double work, and of 
course, to do it half as well. 

However much they are required to do, 
they have only about so much time in which 
to do it. To go at the editorial brain with 
pickaxe and shovel, and to find after all there 
is no gold tliere, unless in proportion to the 
time expended in mining it, may be somewhat 
discouraging ; but to dig up a good deal that 
is not gold, and to feel under moral compul- 
sion that we must ship it off to our readers in 
lieu of something better, is considerably worse. 
However, we take pleasure in thanking 
our college readers for the general courtesy 
they have shown in their criticisms ; though 
just at this point we feel that Ave might have 
done better ; certainly we might if we had had 
in the beginning, our present experience. It 
seems to be a great misfortune to many col- 
lege papers, that the new editors begin their 
duties without any previous knowledge of 
them. Can not this be obviated? We think 
it can. Let associates be elected from the 
lower classes, to a subordinate place on the 
paper, and then when their turn comes to 



assume the responsibilities, they will be pre- 
pared to do so. In some colleges this system 
is found very successful. 

We have only one more feeling to speak of, 
and that is the feeling which the memory of 
pleasant associations always prompts. Per- 
haps this may seem to contradict what has 
been already said ; but it does not. We have 
experienced much that is pleasant, in connec- 
tion with the paper; enough to more than 
offset all that has been different. The labor 
will beiorgotten first; the feeling of our un- 
worthy efforts, spite our deep modestj^ must 
in the order of nature, go next; but the 
memory of all the rest will grow pleasant and 
last the longest. 

Our readers will pardon us for lingering 
so long in the effort to bid them good-bye. 
The class, to which we are responsible, we 
know will do so. As for ourselves we have 
only to place our pen up on the rack whence 
we took it a year ago, and the ceremony is 
complete. 



MEMOKIA. 

Though Tvalking in the busy niavt 
Of men and throngh tlie crdwded street, 
We sometimes bear her silver feet 
Ring down the chambers of the heart. 

But wheu the moon, with pale white hand, 
Uprises from her ruined towers, 
And motions on the bashful hours, 
And makes a silence in the land; 

When from the churchyard's slumber still. 
The cold and ghostly marbles stare, — 
Their faces lifted white and bare 
Against the sky that crowns the hill ; 

When the sad brook from sharpened stones 
Sends its low trill into the car 
Of sleeping Night, and shadows drear 
Drop over from tlie towering cones; 

And through heart - windows shadows stare. 
Then drop down formless on the floor, 
Mid beings that will nevermore 
Make answer to our Fpeech and prayer ; 

Then she doth through the window look ; 
She sees the wcudd so wide, so lone ; 
She steals the shadow from the cone. 
She steals the song from out the brook. 

Then is her voice most sweet ; then fall 
No more her steps from place to place. 
But with a strange, unearthly grace. 
She sings her song, and that is all. 



198 



BO WD OIN ORIENT. 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 

PUBLISHED EVEKT ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY DUE- 
IN& THE COLLEGIATE TEAK AT 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE, 
By the Class of 1874. 

EDITORS. 

S. V. Cole, L. H. Kimball, 

W. T. Goodale, D. O. S. Lowell, 

F. W. Hawthorne, F. K. Wheeler, 

H. K. White. 

Terms — $2 00 a year in advance; single copies, 
15 cents. 

Address communications to Bowdoin Orient, 
Brunswicli, Maine. 

For sale at 7 Appleton Hall, Bowdoin College. 
Also by J. Griffin and B. G. Dennison, Brunswicli ; 
and A. Williams & Co., 135 Washington St., Boston. 

CONTENTS. 
Vol. III., No. 17. — March 25, 1874. 

Our Heroes. (Poem.) 193 

A Wrong Principle 193 

Early American Colleges 194 

Spring. (Poem.) 195 

College Degrees 195 

Valedictory 196 

Memoria. (Poem.) 197 

Editorial Notes 198 

Local 199 

Editors' Table 201 

Alamni Notes 202 

Gleanings 203 



(In order to avoid confusion, tliose in 
arrears will j)lease remit the amount of 
their indebtedness to Walter T. Good- 
ale, Managing Editor, as hereafter tlie new" 
board of editors will receive all letters 
addressed to the Bowdoin Orient. 



:) 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



The Seniors are unanimous in praising the 
recitation in Metaphysics under Dr. Hopkins. 



Lamson, the photographer, has commenced 
work for the Senior Class, and so far as heard 
from is giving very good satisfaction. 



The Forty-first Annual Convention of the 
Psi Upsilon Fraternity will be holden with 
the Lambda Chapter of Columbia College, 
New York City, April 7th and 8th. The del- 
egates from the Kappa are R. A. Gray, W. H. 
Moulton, L. A. Rogers, and F. R. Upton. 



We are not informed whether it is because 
the Faculty have a low opinion of our knowl- 
edge of physics, or because they do not know 
what else to do with us, that we are having a 
second course in sound, electricity, &c. The 
lectures, however, are very interesting, and 
reflect much credit on our professor's skill. 



The " Senior Reform Club " is the latest 
and most approved style of organization among 
us. Every member who disobeys the rules is 
subject to a fine, and the fines are to be used 
in furnishing the club a supper at Commence- 
ment! Strange as it may seem, the more 
swearing there is done the better will be the 
supper ! 



In closing our connection with the Orient 
we feel that justice requires us to publicly 
thank Messrs. Dingley & Co., for the can 
they have bestowed on the typography of the* 
paper. Not only this, but their dealings with 
us have been of the most courteous and gen- 
tlemanly character, so that we take a pleasure 
in commending them to our successors. 



1 



A petition has been in circulation among 
the Seniors for the purpose of reducing the 
number of "parts" to be delivered at Com- 
mencement. It is understood the petition ; 
wants the same number as usual assignee 
We think the citizens of Brunswick and a^ 
others who sit through the tedious exercises 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



199 



of graduation, would favor such a movement 
without doubt. 



It is about time, we tliink, for some of the 
students in the soutli gallery to be informed 
they are making asses of themselves in ap- 
plauding the remarks of the minister. No 
matter whether you like what is said or not, 
the hour of divine service is not the time to 
show your feelings. We have no sympathy 
Avith such demonstration. 



The '74 Debating Club was organized 
during the Freshman year, and has existed and 
flourished up to the present time, within four 
months of the graduation of tlie class, and its 
last meeting was one of the most interesting 
of all. We don't know whether this has ever 
been done by any previous class, but we think 
it can be done a great many times more. 

We think it would be a most commend- 
able idea if tlie classes now in college, and the 
classes yet to come in, would oi'ganize debating 
clubs at once and strive to emulate '74's exam- 
ple. The discipline thus gained is something 
that can be gained in no other way. 



If there is a place within our College 
grounds where Bowdoin is actually disgraced, 
and for which any one who cares for her repu- 
tation must feel a flush of shame, it is in the 
Chapel at morning prayers. The conduct of 
students there at that time is getting to be 
really intolerable. 

We know not what has become of the 
manhood and sense of propriety of those 
who, we suppose, lay claim to the name of 
gentlemen. We do not mean to be too harsh 
upon carelessness or thoughtless levity, but 
some things we have seen at prayei's cannot 
be excused under any such names. 

. We should, at least, expect to see as much 
order there (and we do not) as in any ordinary 
assembly. Any one would expect, however, 



some evidence of more respectful, not to say 
devotional feelings, in a place consecrated to 
worship. 

LOCAL. 

" Did you hear Barnabee ? " 

The Seniors have finished " Outlines of 
Man," and are deep in the " Law of Love." 

G. B. Wheeler, L. H. KimbaU, and W. H. 
iMoultou, are committee on Commencement 
music. 

The Seniors are rejoicing to think they 
will soon shake " Brunswick mud " forever 
from their shoes. 

We occasionally hear anxious inquiries for 
Daniel Pratt. Some one evidentlj^ wishes to 
dispose of some old clothes. Where is the 
ancient traveller ? 

The following Juniors liave been assigned 
parts : E. H. Hall, W. H. Holmes, and F. A. 
Powers. For some unknown reason the usual 
number, four, was not assigned. 

The following Juniors have been appoint- 
ed to take part in the Senior and Junior 
Exhibition which comes off next Monday 
evening: E. H. Hall, W. H. Holmes, F. A. 
Powers. 

We hear that the boating men are talking 
of a regatta on the river, at Commencement 
time. It is to be open only to this college, 
and will consist of six -oar races, single -scuU 
races, etc., etc. 

The Athenean and Peucinian Societies are 
taking steps preparatory to the " St. Croix 
Debate," which takes place in May next. The 
question then to be discussed is as follows : 
" Does trial by jury best secure the ends of 
justice ? " Athenea has elected the following 
disputants : A. G. Bradstreet, S. V. Cole, and 
E. S. Osgood. 



200 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



The Freshmen will soon be agitating the 
class cane question. Better far never to con- 
sider the matter. Class canes are quite a 
consideration, pecuniarily, and of little good, 
practically. For a few weeks Sophomoric 
style and dignity sport them on all occasions ; 
they are then placed over some picture, there 
to gather dust for the next three years. 

At a meeting of the Boating Association, 
some time since, it was voted to send to the 
regatta our Commodore, Hunter, in a single 
scull, and a Freshman crew. The great diffi- 
culty to be encountered is the money question, 
and a vital question it is. It is to be hoped, 
however, that a greater enthusiasm may be 
awakened in this direction, and that the 
money may be forthcoming. 

One or two Sabbaths ago, one of oiu' min- 
isters, speaking of the good effects of the 
temperance crusade in the West, remarked in 
the course of his sermon, that whiskey had 
fallen several cents on a gallon. At the same 
time he chanced to glance up to the galleries 
filled with " the boj's," who manifested their 
appreciation of the fact by " audible smiles," 
and by " wooding up." 

Two Juniors were calling on a young lady 
who had a particular liking for one of them. 
In fact, it was a "mutual attachment." She 
had just ceased singing, with a great deal of 
feeling, and apparently with a great deal of 
effect, the song entitled, " My heart is thy 
home," and was receiving the lavish praise of 
the favored one, when No. 2 looked up and 
remarked, that Ae preferred to " board round." 

The Seniors have been provided with 
printed Photograph Lists, containing the 
names of all the professors, of the class, of the 
former members of the class, and of the differ- 
ent views and groups usually taken. On one 
page is a summary, on which each one makes 
out the number and kind of pictures he 
wishes, and returns the list to the committee. 



This plan saves much time and trouble, and 
prevents much confusion. 

The Germania Band and the Temple Quar- 
tette have been engaged for the Commencement 
concert. Efforts were made to secure the 
services of Miss Kellogg, but owing to the 
fact that she spends the summer on the Hud- 
son, for the purpose of getting a little rest, 
and acquiring strength for her labors in the. 
fall and winter, the efforts were not as sue- ' 
cessful as it was wished they would be. The 
committee are in correspondence with Miss 
Cary, and others, with indications of better 
success. 

The " athletes " are in hard training for 
the gymnastic exhibition, which takes place 
on the last Friday evening of the term. It 
promises to be one of the best ever given, and 
deserves a hearty reception and a generous 
support. We have heard vague rumors that 
exhibitions were also to be given in Portland, 
Lewiston, and Bath. Messrs. C. F. Kimball 
and C. H. Wells are getting up a dance, to 
take place immediately after the exhibition. 
In their hands we are assured it will be a first- 
class affair. 

A meeting of the students of the college 
was held in the Senior Recitation Room, Sat- 
urday, March 21st, to consider Bowdoni's 
interest in the inter-collegiate literary eon- 
test. It was voted to elect competitors for 
both prizes, but the disposition seemed to be 
to defer the selection until next term. The 
Senior Class held a meeting immediate^ after, 
and voted, after considerable discussion, to 
employ the Germania Band for the Com- 
mencement Concert, in preference to the 
Beethoven Quintette Club. The Temple 
Quartette is already engaged. The solo 
singer has not been engaged yet, but from the 
report of the committee, we should judge a 
pretty lively correspondence was being kept 
up. 



I 



BOWDOIN OBIENT. 



201 



We noticed in one of our exchanges, a 
short time since, an account of the practical 
working of the injunction, " Watch and pray." 
The following came under our observation : 
An old gentleman, far advanced in his sec- 
ond childhood, regularly attended the weekly 
prayer meetings, accompanied by his dog. 
Frequently, the latter individual, not appre- 
ciating his master's long prayers, would wan- 
der away from his accustomed place beneath 
the seat. The old gentleman, who M'as alwaj^s 
watching as well as praying, would invariably 
stop short in his prayer, and whistle to the 
dog till he returned to his place, when he 
would resume at the point where he had been 
interrupted. 

The following is the programme for the 
Senior and Junior Exhibition, Monday even- 
ing, April 6th : — 

Music. 
Salutatory Oration iu Latin. 

Samuel V. Cole, Brunswick. 

Lincoln's Speech at Gettysburg. (German version.) 

* Edwin H. Hall, Windham. 



EDITORS' TABLE. 



Marshall W. Davis, Bethel. 
Music. 
Charles Sumner. 

Charles H. Huuter, Pittsfield. 
Minuclus to the Romans. (Greek version from Livy.) 
* Walter H. Holmes, Calais. 
The Romance and Reality of Law. 

L. Houghton Kimball, Bath. 
Music. 
^Esthetic Culture. 

D. 0. S. Lowell, Denmark. 

Demosthenes to the Athenians. (Latin version.) 

* Frederic A. Powers, Pittsfield. 
The Epicycloid. 

Horace W. Philbrook, Brunswick. 
Music. 
American Legislation. 

Horace A. Powers, Pittsfield. 
Political Degeneracy. 

George B. Wheeler, Kennebmikport. 



Why may Henry V. be likened to a fish ? 
Because he was caught by a diet of worms. 
(Only the student in German history can 
appreciate the above.) — Magenta. 



The Harvard papers stand very nearly at 
the head of college journals. 

The Williams Vidette is also among the 
best of our exchanges. 

Sorry we can not say the same for the 
College Herald. It devotes too much space to 
local and personal items and to gleanings. 

A late number of the University Herald 
has a well considered editorial on " scientific 
courses." We sympathize with it thoroughlj^. 
It has often been a wonder to ns whether 
" scientific courses " were the same every- 
where. So far as we can discover, they are. 
Here at Bowdoin some of our scientific stu- 
dents are put down in the catalogue as "stu- 
dents in both courses," and they will graduate, 
we presume, with two degrees. It must seem 
strange to outsiders how this can be. Either 
one of these three things must be concluded : 
that such students are twice as smart as the 
others, or that one of the two courses requires 
very little time and so becomes a farce, or 
that those who pursue one course have only 
half as much to do as they ought to have. 
We presume, however, that our catalogue is 
a little ambiguous in this as in some other 
respects. The true state of the case, as we 
understand it, is that those who are now 
"pursuing both courses," have been in the 
classical course, but changed over to the 
scientific when this latter was introduced. 
Hereafter Ave hope that one course at Bow- 
doin will be advertised as sufiicient to keep 
students busj', as the facts of the case really 
are. 

The Bickinsonian is hardly up to the aver- 
age of college papers. 

The Madisonensis comes to us with its 
usual freshness. Its subjects are in general 
well selected, and the editorial matter always 
contains something worth reading. 



202 



BOWBOm ORIENT. 



We learn from the Amherst Student that 
Daniel Pratt, G.A.T., has recently turned up 
en route for Ohio. His new lecture is entitled 
" The Foundations of the Elementary World." 
The Amherst Freshmen presented him with 
a badge inscribed with the degree C.O.D. 
Mr. Pratt was also presented with an ode 
dedicated to his praises ; the chorus of it is so 
pathetic that we can not forbear to quote ; — 

" Clang the bassoon — let the kettledrum ring; 
"Whaugdoodle and gong in harmonioas song; 
"While the clam and the nightingale sweetly prolong 
The praises of Pratt — Oratorical King! " 

The Colhge Olio deals thus with an 
offender : " We are surprised to see the 
'' University Revieiv insert one of our locals 
" verbatim in its own local department, with- 
" out giving us credit for it. Now we do not 
" care for the local, but we would like to see 
" the integrity of journalism maintained, even 
" by the Revieiv. ' Be virtuous and you will 
" be happy.' " On turning over a leaf we 
felt quite amused to find the Olio sinning in 
the same direction, — evidently having for- 
gotten it would like to see the " integrity of 
college journalism maintained." 

The illustration by which it describes the 
positions of Juniors at recitation is somewhat 
tortured, but the wording is stUl so close to 
the original as to leave little doubt in our 
minds whence it was derived. Now "we 
should not be forward in claiming so insig- 
nificant a piece of property, unless we found 
it in the possession of one who abhors plagiar- 
ism in a direct form. We abhor it indirectly 
as well. Do your level best ; only remember 
the old saying, " Be virtuous and you will be 
happy." 

Perhaps some of us remember the confi- 
dential circulars received from one " Charles 
H. Munroe," who advertises to furnish State 
Senators, college students and others, with 
speeches and Commencement parts for a con- 
sideration. We are glad to see that the Yale 
Courant, wishing, as it says, to extend the 



beneficial effects of Mr. Munroe's offer beyond 
the chosen few, publishes the whole commu- 
nication. 

With the Beloit College Monthly we do not 
feel so well acquainted as with many of our 
exchanges. It comes up to the average of 
college xjublications, perhaps. Its form — 
magazine — would lead us to expect some- 
thing pretty good, and if we get disappointed, 
adverse prejudice might result; for if there is 
any particular form reprehensible in a college 
publication, we think it is the magazine. 



We have other exchanges on our 
but time and space have assigned our limits, 
and we must abide the decision. The present 
number severs our connection with the paper, 
and in our exchanges we feel we are to lose 
many pleasant acquaintances. In speaking of 
them we have always endeavored to speak 
justly ; if we have failed, the failure is due to 
ignorance and not to prejudice. We have 
derived much benefit from you, exchanges, 
and feel only too surely how little we have 
offered in return. We commend our success- 
ors to you ; but as for ourselves we must bid 
you an affectionate adieu. 

ABUMNI NOTES. 



[We earnestly request contributions for this 
department from the Ahimni and friends of the 
College.] 

Woodward, of '70, is teacher of the sci- 
ences in an institution at Springboro, Ohio. 

Alexander, of '70, has disposed of his in- 
terest in the Daily and Weekly G-azette, at 
Fort Wayne, Ind., for the purpose of becom- 
ing Indiana correspondent of the Cincinnati 
G-azette and Chicago Biter- Ocean, with his 
head-quarters at Indianapolis, where letters 
wiU reach him. 

Howe, of '70, who has recently returned 
from a two years' sojourn in Europe, is now 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



203 



engaged in selecting a location in the West 
where he can find it profitable to hang out his 
M. D. banner. On his way West, he visited 
his classmates, Torrey and Oakes, at New 
York ; Hanson, at Lafayette, Ind. ; and Alex- 
ander, at Indianapolis. His present address 
is Harrodsburg, Kentucky. 



GLEANINGS. 

Ponying is of classic origin. By means of 
it the Grecians took Troy. — Ex. 

The principal parts of college life at 
Harvard — Gormandizo, Guzzleiri, Snoozivi, 
Flunkum. — Williams Review. 

1st Student — Where is the lesson in 
Philosophy to-morrow ? 2d Student — It be- 
gins with lightning, and goes to thunder. — 
Targum. 

Through the aid of an eminent legal gen- 
tleman of Biddeford, Me., who is trustee of 
Dartmouth College, valuable woodland has 
been secured which will realize to the institu- 
tion $100,000.— i7.». 

A bit of logic : Protagoras maintained 
that all is illusion, and that there is no such 
thing as truth. But Aristotle refuted him by 
the following dilemma : " Your proposition is 
true or false. If it is false then you are 
answered ; if true, then there is something 
true, and your proposition fails." — Harvard 
Advocate. 

A gawky saAV, for the first time, a school- 
girl going through some gymnastic exercises 
for the amusement of the little ones at home. 
After gazing at her with looks of interest and 
commiseration for a while, he asked a boy 
nearby "if that girl had fits?" "No,",re- 
jjlied the lad, contemptuously ; " that's gym- 
nastics." " Oh, 'tis, hey ?" said the verdant ; 
" how long has she had 'em ? " — Ex. 

A Paris correspondent of the Pall Mall 
Gazette tells this singular story of the super- 
vision of the French press : In the daj^s of the 
Empire a fiery editor of the south was sum- 
3uoned before the correctional police, and fined 
for an article written by a person whose name 



he refused to reveal till the court had pro- 
nounced its sentence. The verdict delivered, 
the editor betrayed the name of the guilty 
party. It was the name of the Emperor. 

Would it not be a good plan to have a 
system of telegraph wires runxiing round our 
recitation rooms ? It is a great deal of trouble 
to pass notes back and forth, and must occa- 
sion the professors considerable annoyance. — 
Argus. 

The Emperor of Russia having presented 
four magnificent horses to the King of Italy, 
the latter has now presented to the Czar a 
table of splendid workmanship. The slab is 
of pietra-dura mosaic work, representing 
Apollo surrounded by the emblems of the 
Muses and wreaths of flowers. Below the 
slab is a relievo of oxj'dized silver, represent- 
ing Dante and scenes from the Divina Corn- 
media. The foot of ebon}^ with lions' feet of 
silver, is ornamented with the arms of Ita]}^ 
This masterpiece of work has been placed in 
the hermitage. 

A young ladj-, the daughter of a rich peti'o- 
leum operator, before returning from boarding 
school, had a party given for her benefit. 
Upon the bottom of her invitation cards she 
caused to be inscribed "R. S. V. P." and one 
was sent to a j'oung man, Avho had also made 
his monej^ by boring. He did not come, but 
sent a card with the letters, "D. S. C. C." 
Meeting him in the street she asked him what 
the letters meant. "Tell me first what 3'ours 
meant." " Oh, mine was French for ' Respond 
if you please.' " "Well, mine was English for 
'Darned sorry I can't come.' " — Cornell Times. 

An inter-collegiate contest resulting suc- 
cessfully has just been held at Knox College 
Galesburg, 111. The colleges engaged in the 
contest were Chicago University, the Indus- 
trial University of Champaign, Monmouth 
and Beloit Colleges, and Iowa State Univer- 
sity and Grinnell College. Each of these 
institutions sent an orator to Knox at the ex- 
pense of the Adelphia Society, to contend for 
the first and second prizes of flOO and $75, 
also offered by the Society. Knox took no 
Ijart in the contest. Mr. T. E. Egbert of 
Chicago University took the first prize, and 
Mr. T. Foster of Beloit the second. — Yale 
Courant. 



204 



BOWDOIN ORIENT. 



Professor Olney has a pleasant little habit 
of giving receptions to the Freshmen semi- 
occasionally. It was at one of these " cote- 
ries" that he asked a Freshman for the modulus 
of the common system of logarithms. The 
boy knew the figures, but couldn't read the 
decimal; therefore he told the Professor that 
he couldn't give it. " Try it," said the Pro- 
fessor. The boy bliu'ted out, " I can't give it, 
Prof., but I can sing it." ■ The class and Pro- 
fessor both joined in the chorus. 

One of the professors in the medical de- 
partment received a note from an irate student, 
to which the professor made the following 
reply : "As a man interested in the highest 
good of students, I should respectfully sug- 
gest, and emphatically urge upon him, the pro- 
priety of trading his anatomy for a grammar, 
his physiology for a spelling-book, and his 
materia medica for a dictionary, then go home 
and spend two years' laborious study on these 
hitherto neglected books, and then come 
back and try to write a note of twelve words 
without having six mistakes in it." — Chronicle. 



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Heliotype Publication 

—OF THE — 

GRAY COLLECTION 

— OF — 

ENGRAVINGS 

Harvard College, 

— BY — 

JAMES R. OSGOOD & CO., Publishers, 

BOSTON. 

Messrs. James R. Osgood & Co. have the pleasure of announcing that 
by the desire of the President and Fellows of Harvard College, they are 
now publishing Heliotype reproductions of the principal art treasures of 
the " Gray Collection of Engravings," owned by Harvard College. This 
Collection is one of the most complete and perfect in the country. It con- 
tains the choicest and most costly proofs of many of the best engravers of 
the world, and is especially rich in the original works of Albert Durer, 
Rembrandt, Marc-Antonio, Lukas Van Ijsyden, Caracci, and others. It 
comprises the best engraviugs of Raphael Morghen, Longhi, Toschi, Ander- 
loni, Muller, "Willie, Desnoyers, Mandel, Strange, Sharpe, "Woollet, and 
other leading engravers, from the pictures of Raphael, Titian, Correggio,. 
Guide, Leonardo da Vinci, Murillo and other celebrated artists. The por- 
traits by Velazquez, Van Dyck and others, and the engraved heads of dis- 
tinguished persons by Nanteuil, Edelinck, Masson and Houbraken are a 
most important feature of the collection. 

The publishers are enabled by means of the rapidity, faithfulness aud 
artistic quality of the Heliotype Process, to offer beautiful reproductions 
from the choicest and most costly works of art at the lowest possible prices. 
Rare etchings or artist^proof engravings worth hundreds of dollars each, 
may be reproduced and sold at prices varying from fifty cents to two or 
three dollars, thus bringing the treasures of art-galleries within the reach 
of all, and affording a means of art-education hitherto unattainable. 
About 70 subjects are now ready. 

Special prices made with Colleges and Institutions of Learning. Nearly 
10,000 prints have been sold to the students of Harvard. 

W. T. GOO DA E, PuTiUsliers' Agent, 

For Bowdoin College. 



BOOKS! BOOKS! BOOKS! 

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13 now ready to launder goods in the best manner at the most reasonable 
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